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2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Monday, August 01

 

Total Number of Records Found: 8

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AH:   

Best Practices in the Use of Educational Technologies I
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:40AM
  Presider: Andrew Garvin,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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AH01:   

Minds-On Audio-Guided Activities in Introductory College Physics Courses
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: James Brian Hancock, II, Central Michigan University
989-714-5331, hanco1jb@cmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Marco Fornari
  Abstract: Minds-On Audio Guided Activities (MAGA) are Podcast-delivered instruction designed to engage students in all-body experiments and foster long-term conceptual learning. These Podcasts guide students through experimentation, prompt group discussion, and lead students toward connecting daily experiences with the activity. Instruction by MAGA has undergone preliminary testing in an introductory physics course at Central Michigan University. The experiment is designed according to the standard protocol of learning assessment and involves pre- and post-tests and student interviews. Topics are currently focused on mechanics and range from discovering the differences between distance and displacement to momentum to the Coriolis effect. The session will include details of the approach and a discussion of preliminary results.
  Footnotes: None
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AH02:   

The Monty Hall Problem Using Clickers
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Stephen H. Irons, Yale University
203-432-3664, stephen.irons@yale.edu
  Co-Author(s): C. Meg Urry
  Abstract: In the lecture setting, clickers make the collection of student-generated input quick and easy. Though traditionally employed in conjunction with conceptual questions and peer instruction, clickers can also be used to perform statistical experiments in real time. We describe an activity that combines clickers and a simple paper prop to conduct rapid and multiple statistical experiments. The eponymously named Monty Hall problem is an excellent exercise in conditional probability for students as it has a counterintuitive solution, but the actual outcomes can be dramatically demonstrated. Here we describe the problem and its solution and then discuss the results of an in-class implementation conducted during a lecture on probability. In addition to expanding the activity to include variations on the initial problem statement, instructors can also model radioactive decay using students, clickers, and a random number generator.
  Footnotes: None
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AH03:   

Tweetment of Twitter in the Classroom
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: John T. Miller, Thornapple Kellogg High School
617-970-0044, johnthomasmiller@hotmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: How do I better connect with and appropriately communicate with my students? Twitter should be considered as part of the solution. This presentation is about unleashing the power of Twitter to better educate, inform, and connect your students to your classroom and curriculum. This talk will be focused on how Twitter is being used in a high school setting and strategies to make it successful. Educators of all levels will find this talk informative.
  Footnotes: www.tinyurl.com/tweetment
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AH04:   

Using Simulations to Help Prepare Students for the Lab
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Mark J. Paetkau, Thompson Rivers University
250 828 5453, mpaetkau@tru.ca
  Co-Author(s): Dan Bissonnette, Colin Taylor
  Abstract: For the past few years we have been using online simulations to help students prepare for their Introductory Physics labs. We have written online animations allowing students to simulate the lab before arriving, which, ideally, more effectively prepares students for the lab. To test whether the simulations are more effective than traditional pen-and-paper questions as pre-lab exercises, we attempted to measure the "level-of-preparedness" of our students. Using our preparedness measure, we compare the preparedness for the two forms of pre-lab exercises. A statistically significant change in "preparedness" is found with the use of online simulations over the pen-and-paper pre-labs.
  Footnotes: None
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AH05:   

Using Web-based Multimedia Prelectures in Introductory Physics
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Homeyra R. Sadaghiani, Cal Poly Pomona
(909)869-5194, hrsadaghiani@csupomona.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For the last two years, I have been using Multimedia Learning Modules (MLM)* developed by University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne as online Pre-lecture assignments in introductory physics courses at Cal Poly Pomona. By exposing students to the key ideas of lecture prior to class, MLMs allow instructors to focus on more in-depth application of the physics concepts during class. I will discuss the impact MLMs had on student preparation for class discussion and exam performance.
  Footnotes: * https://online-s.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/phys211/gtm/No_Login/page.html
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AH06:   

Math Machines: Connecting Physics with Math and Engineering
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Fred Thomas, Sinclair Community College
937-832-0792, fred.thomas@mathmachines.net
  Co-Author(s): Robert Chaney
  Abstract: Math Machines is a unique technology that establishes explicit links to mathematics and engineering within physics labs and student-focused classrooms. Students design and test free-form mathematical functions to control engineering-style physical systems and complete immediate, physical and dynamic tasks. Examples include programming a light to follow an accelerating object, programming an astronomical clock to replicate the motions of the Moon, programming motions of a platform to simulate earthquakes of arbitrary magnitude, and programming red, green, and blue lights to display oscillating colors in various combinations. Equipment is inexpensive, consisting primarily of such things as a hobby servo motor and a 3-color LED in combination with a SensoDAQ or NI myDAQ computer interface. Schools are encouraged to build similar equipment and share it with math, science, engineering and technology teachers in their region.
  Footnotes: Supported in part by NSF?s Advanced Technological Education Program through grant DUE-1003381. More information is available at www.mathmachines.net.
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AH07:   

Teaching with a TabletPC in Introductory Physics
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Krista E. Wood, University of Cincinnati
513-745-5745, Krista.Wood@uc.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Students in introductory physics often need significant support to develop the thought processes to be successful in physics. A TabletPC, similar to a SMART Board, can be used to create screencasts (videos) of worked out problems or even complete problem-solving sessions. If the instructor records the audio with the writing, students can watch the videos or replay parts they don't understand. The TabletPC can also be used to record Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) results using the screen capture function or screencasts of complete video analysis demonstrations. Since ILDs particularly focus on helping students develop concepts, these videos are effective reinforcements for what occurs during the ILD in class.
  Footnotes: None
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