National Meeting Program Schedule

2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


Sign In

Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Monday, August 01

 

Total Number of Records Found: 7

Check


Add Items View Itinerary New Search Clear Form

BI:   

Cross Campus Collaboration: What I Learned From the Liberal Arts About Teaching Physics
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:40PM
  Presider: Stephanie Magleby,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
Select Item

BI01:   

Brigham Young University's 15-Week University Course
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: R. Steven Turley, Brigham Young University
8014223095, turley@byu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Susan Gong, Tyler Jarvis
  Abstract: Brigham Young University's "15-Week University" course brought together students and faculty with diverse backgrounds and wide-ranging ability to experiment with learning principles as they applied to physics, calculus, English, and music. The challenge was to explore core ideas with enough depth and rigor to ensure that gains in learning could be retained, improved, and applied for long-term growth. A learning community emerged as everyone became a learner and teacher engaged in: 1) identifying key elements and core ideas, 2) maximizing resources through innovative use of technology, and 3) solving challenging problems that connected fundamental pinciples to concrete skills and personal values. Results included substantial (in some cases dramatic) increases in quantitative skills and writing ability, and enthusiasm for learning in general. The synergy of this wide-ranging learning experience happened as participants rotated their teacher/learner roles, connected ideas and information, and reframed their knowledge from multiple perspectives.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BI02:   

Behind the 15-Week University
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Susan P. Gong, Brigham Young University
603 743-1447, spgong@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Steve Turley
  Abstract: The 15-Week U was an experience of re-imagining classroom relationships, content, and time. Rather than treating the inevitable spread in ability and background as a hindrance, this class emphasized and heightened the differences by shifting learner and teacher roles. Teachers from the various disciplines of the course became model learners as the topics shifted. Students with certain strengths became teachers as the course emphasis changed. Such shifts created a rich source of individualized input for every member of the community and multiplied the sources of energy and motivation for learning. The interdisciplinary nature of the course meant that content was viewed from multiple perspectives. Rather than dilute content, this framework intensified both quantitative and non-quantitative thinking. Students with little science background made surprising leaps forward in their engagement and competence, and students with a stronger background consolidated the magnified their grasp of skills and subject matter.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BI03:   

The Physics of Theatre: Influences on Teaching and Research
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Eric C. Martell, Millikin University
217-766-9078, emartell@millikin.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Physics of Theatre project was started to address a clear need within the theatrical community for better understanding of physics concepts in order to design and build increasingly more complex and potentially dangerous equipment safely and efficiently. My efforts within the project are in two main areas: 1) experimentally studying the properties of materials commonly used in theatre and 2) educating theatre technicians about the principles of physics through lectures, workshops, and the development of pedagogical materials. Through this project, we have developed lecture materials and labs that I use in both introductory and advanced undergraduate classes. I have also been able to expand my research interests into areas which are accessible to undergraduates as early as their sophomore year. The physics in these projects is not particularly advanced, but students can develop a much deeper understanding of what they did and have true ownership of their projects.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BI04:   

Introductory Physics at a Small Campus
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:10PM - 2:20PM
  Author: Gabriela Popa, Ohio University Zansville
7405881469, popag@ohio.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Traditionally, introductory physics courses require a good handling of mathematical manipulations. Many students come to college with a desire to learn physics, and they say that they like it. But when they take college physics they find the mathematics involved in it challenging. However their desire to do well is not enough sometimes to solve problems. Many students have a good feeling for the concepts and like laboratory experiments. In an introductory physics class at a small college, the student population is very diverse in background and expectations. Talking with my colleagues from other disciplines I learn about their type of assignments, and I offered my students choices. I will present different types of choices for in class and at home assignments.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BI05:   

Development of Active Learning Tools for a Course on Physics and Music
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:20PM - 2:30PM
  Author: Heather Whitney, Wheaton College
6307525897, heather.whitney@wheaton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The physics education research literature provides a wealth of information on active-learning procedures, such as interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs), peer instruction facilitated with clickers, or tutorial systems. However, much of this material has been focused on their use in courses that cover the canon of topics, such as introductory physics courses designed for science majors or conceptual physics courses. Courses that investigate the connections between physics and music are common in physics department course offerings for general education purposes, and they provide an important opportunity to instruct students who may not otherwise take a course in the field. A suite of these tools has been developed for a course on physics and music. Discussion will include clicker ILDs, clicker questions, and lab-based activities, all designed to enhance the learning of students in topics such as motion, oscillations and waves, and sound.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BI06:   

Physics for Filmmakers: Goals, Tracker Labs, and Projects
  Location: SS 104
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 2:30PM - 2:40PM
  Author: Timothy L. McCaskey
Columbia College Chicago - Dept. of Science and Mathematics
312-369-7765, tmccaskey@colum.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Columbia College offers an introductory, algebra-based mechanics course called "Physics for Filmmakers." The course is for students who wish to learn how to use the laws of physics in making more accurate and/or artistically deliberate choices in their filmmaking. We debunk common movie errors and misconceptions, and students must also complete a film project that demonstrates correct physics in some way. In this talk, I will discuss how we use Tracker (http://www.cabrillo.edu/~dbrown/tracker/) in our labs to teach both filming ideas and physics concepts, some final film projects we have seen, and how we use PER-influenced ideas to further support our learning goals.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

© 2017 American Association of Physics Teachers
Have questions about this site? Email the webmaster.
2011 AAPT Winter Meeting Past Meeting Info Help Sign In