National Meeting Program Schedule

2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


Sign In

Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Monday, August 01

 

Total Number of Records Found: 5

Check


Add Items View Itinerary New Search Clear Form

BJ:   

Astronomy Teaching and Learning
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:50PM
  Presider: Spencer Buckner,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
Select Item

BJ01:   

Near-Earth Asteroids: Risk Assessment with Middle School Students
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:10PM
  Author: Kathryn E. Devine, The College of Idaho
208 459 5064, kdevine@collegeofidaho.edu
  Co-Author(s): Robin Cruz, Ann Koga, James Dull
  Abstract: The College of Idaho (C of I), located in Caldwell, ID, runs a cooperative summer program with Syringa Middle School (Caldwell, ID). This program, titled The C of I/Syringa Math and Science Summer Institute (MSSI), is now in its third year. MSSI is an educational enrichment program for Caldwell 7th and 8th grade students that specifically targets students who demonstrate potential for academic success but who are at risk for dropping out of school. The MSSI provides enrichment activities in science/engineering with a strong mathematical component. The 8th grade students spend the week-long program studying near-Earth asteroids and probability. The students discover what types of asteroids pose a risk to civilization, and apply their knowledge of probability to determine whether civilization is, indeed, at risk. This talk will focus on the misconceptions MSSI students have about probability and asteroid collisions, as well as the benefits of a summer enrichment program for these students.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BJ02:   

Astronomical Imaging for Introductory Honors Astronomy Students
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:10PM - 1:20PM
  Author: Robert D. Moore
University of West Georgia, Dept. of Physics
678-839-4096, rmoore@westga.edu
  Co-Author(s): Bob Powell
  Abstract: The University of West Georgia has acquired several astronomical cameras and guided telescopes to accommodate an increasing number of introductory astronomy students and projects that are being conducted by students. This equipment was purchased using local Tech Fee grants. Beginning in the fall semester 2010, honors astronomy students are required to image two celestial objects and to process those images. A majority of these students are non-science majors. Students are given a CD with their images and the images made by their classmates. During the first two semesters of this requirement, the images made by students are excellent, and the student attitudes about the work are positive.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BJ03:   

Problem Solving and Epistemology in Nonquantitative Introductory Science Classes
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:20PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Bradley McCoy, Azusa Pacific University
6264724092, bmccoy@apu.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: General-studies science classes at many universities, such as physical science, earth science, or astronomy, stress memorization and repetition of concepts. This approach leaves students with little appreciation for how science is used to explain phenomena from general principles. We present a novel instructional technique for an earth science class in which the students are instructed in the use of a general problem-solving strategy, adapted from well-known quantitative problem-solving strategies, in order to train the students in how to apply physical principles. Preliminary data using the Epistemological Beliefs Assessment for Physical Science has shown that explicit training in problem solving significantly improves students' epistemology.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

BJ05:   

Astronomy, History, and Computer Simulations: Teaching the Nature of Science
  Location: SS 105
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 1:40PM - 1:50PM
  Author: Todd K. Timberlake, Berry College
(706) 368-5622, ttimberlake@berry.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Introductory astronomy courses are among the most popular science courses taken by non-science majors in college. As a result, these courses represent a crucial opportunity to educate students about the nature of science. I have developed two courses that focus on teaching the nature of science through an exploration of the history of astronomy. One course examines the development of planetary astronomy from Aristotle to Isaac Newton. The other course follows changing notions about our place among the stars from Aristotle to Hubble. In both courses, students make frequent use of computer programs to simulate observations and to visualize theories. The goal of these activities is to help students see how scientific theories are judged against empirical data, consistency with other knowledge, and aesthetic criteria. Course materials are available at http://facultyweb.berry.edu/ttimberlake/copernican/ and http://facultyweb.berry.edu/ttimberlake/galaxies/.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

© 2017 American Association of Physics Teachers
Have questions about this site? Email the webmaster.
2011 AAPT Winter Meeting Past Meeting Info Help Sign In