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2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Monday, August 01

 

Total Number of Records Found: 5

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CF:   

Physics of Sports
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:50PM
  Presider: Bruce Mason,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CF01:   

Using Physics for Baseball Analysis
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Alan M. Nathan, University of Illinois
217-333-0965, a-nathan@illinois.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The trajectory of a baseball moving through the air is very different from the one we teach in our introductory classes in which the only force is that due to gravity. In reality, the aerodynamic drag force (which retards the motion) and the Magnus force on a spinning baseball (which causes the ball to curve) play very important roles that are crucial to many of the subtleties of the game. These forces are governed by three phenomenological quantities: the coefficients of drag, lift, and moment, the latter determining the spin decay time constant. In past years, these quantities were studied mainly in wind tunnel experiments, whereby the forces on the baseball are measured directly. More recently, new tools have been developed that focus on measuring accurate baseball trajectories, from which the forces can be inferred. These tools include high-speed motion analysis, video tracking (the so-called PITCHf/x and HITf/x systems), and Doppler radar tracking via the TrackMan system. In this talk, I will discuss how these new tools work, what they are teaching us about baseball aerodynamics, and how they have the potential to revolutionize the analysis of the game itself.
  Footnotes: None
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CF02:   

Making Sport of Physics
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:30PM
  Author: John E. Goff, Lynchburg College
434-544-8856, goff@lynchburg.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The sports world provides an unlimited number of introductory physics examples. I will use a few of those examples to illustrate how an introductory physics teacher (high school or college/university) can use sports to not only teach physics but to help motivate students. Students in need of a little push may find connections to sports a way to make physics more "real world" than traditional examples.
  Footnotes: None
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CF03:   

The Physics of Kubb
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: Erick P. Agrimson, St. Catherine University
651-690-8834, erickagrimson@stkate.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: If one defines a sport as an activity of diversion in which one engages in relaxation, Kubb or otherwise known as "Viking chess," is a sport to many Scandinavians. The physics behind this Viking game will be discussed such as forces involved, inertia of batons as well as a short synopsis of the game for the uninitiated.
  Footnotes: None
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CF04:   

Student Projects with Video Analysis
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:40PM - 7:50PM
  Author: Aaron Titus, High Point University
336-841-4668, atitus@highpoint.edu
  Co-Author(s): Shawn Sloan, Luke Grome, Mary Funke, Nikki Sanford
  Abstract: Using video analysis software such as Tracker and inexpensive high-speed video cameras, students can do very interesting projects at the introductory level. In this presentation, I will demonstrate two projects completed by students in my introductory calculus-based physics class. (1) High-speed video analysis of a soccer ball kicked with backspin was used to measure the force and torque on the soccer ball by the foot. The force and torque were used to calculate how far off center the foot impacted the ball, i.e. the moment arm. (2) A mechanical device was used to model a hula hoop rotating around a person's arm. High-speed video analysis of a hula hoop rotating on the device showed that a point on the hoop travels in a spiral-like path. A graph of x-position vs. time for a point on the hoop was a sum of two sine curves of similar frequencies, similar to a beat pattern in acoustics.
  Footnotes: None
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