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2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Monday, August 01

 

Total Number of Records Found: 10

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CH:   

Science and Society
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 8:00PM
  Presider: Steve Shropshire,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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CH01:   

Do Physics Best-Sellers Sell Physics Short?
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:30PM - 6:40PM
  Author: Craig C. Wiegert, University of Georgia
706-542-4023, wiegert@physast.uga.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There are many examples of non-technical physics and astronomy books that top the charts on Amazon and make it to the New York Times best-seller list. The most popular books often explore mind-bending topics like string theory, general relativity, and cosmology. While these books certainly generate excitement and fascination with physics among the general public---and future students---their prominence has the unfortunate side effect of misrepresenting the discipline as a whole. I'll discuss the sometimes unrealistic perceptions that our beginning college physics majors have about areas of research in physics and astronomy, and what we're doing to modify those perceptions without (hopefully!) diminishing students' interest in the field.
  Footnotes: None
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CH02:   

The Haunted Physics Lab at Creighton University
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:40PM - 6:50PM
  Author: Thomas H. Zepf, Creighton University
402-558-3125, thzepf@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For over 25 years at Creighton University, "Dr. Zepf's Haunted Physics Lab" has been a popular outreach attraction for teaching basic principles of physics to students and the general public. Currently it is an annual Physics Club project at Creighton University during the Halloween season. In 2004 an article* about it in TPT generated wide interest. Today, applications of the haunted lab theme for teaching science are widespread both in this country and abroad. In this presentation one of the exhibits in Dr. Zepf's Haunted Physics Lab will be explained and a video of it that was made during an actual session will be shown. Watch as visitors are greeted by a seemingly bodiless "Department Head." It talks. It answers questions. It's alive!
  Footnotes: *Thomas H. Zepf, ?The Haunted Physics Lab,? Phys. Teach. 42, 404 (Oct. 2004).
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CH03:   

Data from the Use of a Domestic Ground-Source Heatpump
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 6:50PM - 7:00PM
  Author: Tom Carter, College of DuPage
630-942-3346, cartert@cod.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: During last summer’s Physics and Society session, there was a discussion of the benefits of the use of ground source (a.k.a “geothermal”) heatpumps. In this talk, I will briefly review how a ground source heatpump works and present some historical energy data from the use of my own unit in northern Illinois. I will also point out some reasons why these units are not the best green technology for all situations.
  Footnotes: None
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CH04:   

A Physics of Energy Course by Train, West Coast, USA
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:00PM - 7:10PM
  Author: Katrina M. Hay, Pacific Lutheran University
253 538 5999, hay@plu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Peter B. Davis
  Abstract: Inspired by concern for sustainability and environmental impact of conventional fuel usage, an introductory interdisciplinary travel course was designed. The course provides students with an understanding of the underlying physical principles of traditional and alternative methods of energy production. The Western United States is an ideal region to study practical use and research of hydroelectric, wind, nuclear, solar, ocean wave, and geothermal energy. This course, taught for the first time in January 2011, traveled by Amtrak Coast Starlight train, making stops in Washington, Oregon, and California. Students became aware of their impact on global energy by experiencing first hand the physics connection between communities and energy. This presentation will include learning objectives, energy source locations, an interdisciplinary connection to geology, and discussion of the unique opportunity for faculty to connect with students in an off-campus environment.
  Footnotes: Blog created by the participants of the course: http://plu-west-coast-2011.blogspot.com/
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CH05:   

Integrating Sustainability Across the Science Curriculum of Gustavus Adolphus College
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:10PM - 7:20PM
  Author: Charles F. Niederriter, Gustavus Adolphus College
(507)933-7315, Chuck@gustavus.edu
  Co-Author(s): Amanda Hochstatter, Hasanga Samaraweera
  Abstract: We live in an era when student interest in energy, sustainability, and the environment is increasing, as it becomes clear that our current production and consumption of energy negatively impacts the environment and raises a number of potentially significant challenges for the future. The primary goal of this CCLI project is to improve science education at Gustavus and other colleges across the country by taking advantage of this trend. Integrating sustainability across the science curriculum is an excellent way to educate students about this important area while teaching quantitative skills and increasing interest and enthusiasm for science. We will report on our first summer's work developing laboratory and classroom experiences and discuss plans for future work.
  Footnotes: None
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CH06:   

Physics and the Sewing Machine
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:20PM - 7:30PM
  Author: Courtney W. Willis, University of Northern Colorado
351 2961, courtney.willis@unco.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Few products of the industrial revolution have had as much impact on modern society as the sewing machine. The sewing machine, sometimes referred to as the "Queen of Inventions," was the first home appliance but it also brought us the "American System" of manufacturing with interchangeable parts, ready to wear clothing, the modern department store, the time payment plan, and the sweat shop. Introduced in the mid 1800s, the scientifically inclined were kept informed of each new development in the pages of "The Scientific American," and by the turn of the 20th century high school physics curriculum was being developed utilizing the sewing machine. Since most schools had little scientific apparatus and the sewing machine was rather ubiquitous, many hands-on activities were designed around the sewing machine for use in physics classrooms.
  Footnotes: None
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CH07:   

Gender Bias in Faculty Hiring and Promotion: A Research Proposal
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:30PM - 7:40PM
  Author: Ramon S. Barthelemy, Western Michigan University
231-578-7885, ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Charles R. Henderson
  Abstract: According to the AIP, in 2006 only 10% of faculty at Physics PhD-granting institutions were female. One potential contributor to this underrepresentation of women is gender bias in the hiring and promotion process. This talk will discuss a study of such gender bias in the field of psychology* and present a proposal for a similar study in physics. In the psychology study, a curriculum vita from a faculty member at the beginning or tenure phase of their career was sent to randomly selected faculty. Participants were asked to rate the content of the CV along with their decision for hiring the individual or granting tenure. The CVs were identical except that some had a traditionally male name and others had a traditionally female name. The psychology results found significant gender bias in hiring. Feedback will be invited on the design of a similar study in physics.
  Footnotes: *Steinpreis R, Anders K, Ritzke D (1999) The impact of gender on the review of the CVs of job applicants and tenure candidates: A national empirical study. Sex Roles 41: 509?528.
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CH08:   

A Project-based Curriculum in Energy Studies
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:40PM - 7:50PM
  Author: Theresa Edmonds
Creighton University Energy Studies Program
402-280-3039, mgc91339@creighton.edu
  Co-Author(s): Jay Leighter, Gina Merys, Michael Cherney
  Abstract: A new program in Energy Studies at Creighton University recently welcomed its first students. This STEM program addresses energy issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. The new bachelor of science curriculum develops applied scientists with communications skills, knowledge of public policy, law, and the human factors relevant for implementing their work. In addition to a strong emphasis on problem solving, the program seeks to instill life-long learning skills, augment team work talents, reward innovation, and enhance communication abilities. The project-based curriculum works to tailor the experience to the student. Students are asked to identify what they want from a particular learning experience and to establish expectations. Projects are formulated so that students are required to work on the areas where they need development. Projects are structured to involve active participation of the students. Students are expected periodically to reflect on their work and follow up appropriately. A BA program is also offered.
  Footnotes: This work is supported by the United States Department of Energy. Sponsored by Michael Cherney.
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CH09:   

Education Outreach Efforts of the Acoustical Society of America
  Location: SS Ballroom F
  Date: Monday, Aug.01
  Time: 7:50PM - 8:00PM
  Author: Wendy K. Adams, Acoustical Society of America
970-539-6154, wendy.adams@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The Acoustical Society of America has recently been focusing effort on K-12 (note: the HS material works well for intro college students) outreach through a partnership with the Optical Society of America and AAPT/PTRA (Physics Teaching Resource Agents). This year the acoustical society has created a website with activities for students and materials for teachers at http://exploresound.org. The material addresses the science of sound including physics, music, our ears, animal bioacoustics, architectural acoustics, underwater acoustics, speech and medical acoustics. We've also put together a poster series with guidebooks and are working on an activity kit that will be freely available to teachers. All materials are research based and tested with students. In this presentation we will show the type and breadth of material that's available and where to find it.
  Footnotes: None
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