National Meeting Program Schedule

2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


Sign In

Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Tuesday, August 02

 

Total Number of Records Found: 5

Check


Add Items View Itinerary New Search Clear Form

DE:   

The Big Bang Effect: Representation of Physicists in Popular Culture
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 10:10AM
  Presider: Jacob Clark Blickenstaff,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
Select Item

DE01:   

Evil Geniuses: The Portrayal of Scientists as Villains
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Rebecca C. Thompson, American Physical Society
301-209-3206, thompson@aps.org
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: From Doctor Octopus from Spiderman to Maggie Walsh of Buffy the Vampire Slayer season 4, scientists are often portrayed as evil geniuses intent on using their high IQs to take over the world. Does this affect how the public views scientists? Science in general and physics specifically is so often thought of as "scary." Misconceptions about talking robots and world eating black holes can turn people against physics and the "evil genius" scientists that will destroy the world, either by accident or on purpose.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

DE02:   

Speaking of Physics: The Art of Science Communication
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Stephanie V. Chasteen, University of Colorado Boulder
303-775-3277, stephanie.chasteen@colorado.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Why leave it up to the"experts" (i.e., the media) to portray physics accurately and positively? Speak for yourself, without the need for a translator who may "or may not" get it right. As a scientist, you can talk about what your work means and why it's important with an authority that a science writer doesn't bring to the table. While we can't all be Brian Greene, you can have control over how your work, and physics in general, is presented to the public. In this talk, I'll share some best practices of science communication, gleaned during my time as a science reporter at NPR and elsewhere. These simple tips can take a lifetime to master, but can help you get your message across, to the public, the media, and even Aunt Mabel.
  Footnotes: See Dr. Chasteen's popular publications and podcasts at http://sciencegeekgirl.com/publications.html. More tips on communication at http://communicatingscience.aaas.org.
Select Item

DE03:   

The Big Bang Theory Effect Conjecture
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Jacob Clark Blickenstaff,
6012664742, JCLARKBLICKENSTAFF@GMAIL.COM
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: It could be argued that physics and physicists have not had such popular exemplars as Sheldon and Leonard (the main characters on CBS' Big Bang Theory) since the death of Albert Einstein. Dr. David Salzberg consults on the physics shown on white boards in the show so that material is trustworthy. But how "true" is the representation of physics and physicists that Sheldon and Leonard present to the general public on television every week? How about the female scientists who show up in recurring (though generally not starring) roles? Does it really matter if a TV comedy re-enforces stereotypes about science and scientists? What effect could this show have on students? Interest in learning physics in high school or college? As a physics educator I am concerned that this show and others like it will exacerbate the trend of undergraduates moving away from the physics major.
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

DE04:   

'Physicists and Scientists' on TV....Is THAT Really US?
  Location: SS Ballroom ABC
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 10:00AM - 10:10AM
  Author: Karen A. Williams, East Central University
580-559-5394, kwillims@mac.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Most of us have watched the "Big Bang Theory" on television and thought at times, this reminds me of Dr. X or Dr. Y. Other scenes make us think that isn't true of physicists we know….or is it? Are these depictions characteristic of us? Greater discussion of physics and science from my students seems to come from "Mythbusters" and some other science shows on television now hosted by real physicists. How do TV shows portray scientists? This will examine how various groups (physics majors, nonmajors, etc.) perceive physics/science (i.e. the endeavor) based upon watching physicists/scientists on television. How do they perceive those that do science? Is this perception negative so that it might persuade a high school student to change his mind about becoming a physicist? Is this perception positive for male students? For female students?
  Footnotes: None
Select Item

© 2017 American Association of Physics Teachers
Have questions about this site? Email the webmaster.
2011 AAPT Winter Meeting Past Meeting Info Help Sign In