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2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Tuesday, August 02

 

Total Number of Records Found: 8

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DJ:   

Upper Division Undergraduate
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:40AM
  Presider: Paul Dolan,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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DJ01:   

Percolating the Classroom: Using Mathematica to Introduce Percolation Concepts
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Timothy D. Hooper, Penn State Altoona
814-949-5049, tdh16@psu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gary J. Weisel, Darin T Zimmerman
  Abstract: More than 12,000 articles have been published on the physics of percolation, yet only a handful have attempted to teach the concept to undergraduate students. However, with increases in computing power and widely available software packages, getting started on the study of percolation is a much simpler task today than it was 30 years ago. In this presentation, we show how undergraduate science and engineering students can use a standard desktop computer running Mathematica to perform sophisticated investigations of two-dimensional lattices. In a special topics research course, second-year students learned how to simulate percolation in various lattice geometries, calculate cluster statistics, and extract critical exponents from the simulation data. These students made fundamental connections between the mathematics and physics of percolating systems and reached an understanding of a fundamental physical process that unfortunately, is not often part of a typical undergraduate curriculum.
  Footnotes: None
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DJ02:   

Displaying Sounds with Real-Time Frequency Analyzers
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: David Keeports, Mills College
510-430-2162, dave@mills.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Real-time frequency analyzers (RTFAs) are available as free online downloads, and they are incorporated even in entry-level music production programs such as Apple's GarageBand. Outputting the sound of a drawbar organ though an RTFA clearly shows the analyzer's function. I will present some ways in which this software can be used to display spectral subtleties of sounds that single instantaneous Fourier transforms cannot reveal. When a string is plucked, harmonics initially decay at different rates. Real-time spectral analysis of speech exposes difficulties in representing vowel and consonant sounds as Fourier series. An RTFA provides a useful tool for showing how "resonance box beating" extends to the beating of harmonic waves. Additionally, an RTFA explains why the sound of harmonic waves beating resembles sound processed by a musical phase shifter.
  Footnotes: None
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DJ03:   

Magnetic Resonance (MR) Analogy for a Charged Particle Dynamics in a Magnetic Field
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Michael B. Partensky, Brandeis University
781-894-5917, partensky@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Valery P. Putyrsky
  Abstract: An analogy between the Bloch Equations (BE) of the MR theory (MRT) and the dynamics equations (DE) for a charged particle in a magnetic field allows for a unified description of two different groups of electromagnetic phenomena. In a static magnetic field B0, BE for magnetization M and DE for the velocity V, are formally equivalent. Hence, V(t) performs Larmor precession around the direction of B0, resulting in a familiar helical trajectory. With oscillating magnetic field, this analogy still holds under certain conditions, e.g., if the Lorenz force due to the induced electric field can be neglected. This bridges the MRT and the particle dynamics. The resonant behaviors of V are described in the rotating reference frame [1]. The particle trajectories are discussed and compared with the solutions accounting for the effects of the induced electric field. [1] I.I. Rabi, N.F. Ramsay, J. Schwinger, Rev. Mod. Phys., 64, 167 (1954)
  Footnotes: None
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DJ04:   

Stages of Participation as Stages of Expertise
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Idaykis Rodriguez, Florida International University
305 348-4881, irodr020@fiu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Eric Brewe, Laird H Kramer
  Abstract: Expertise research in physics has focused heavily on differences between experts and novices. In an effort to extend the scope of expertise research, we are engaged in an ongoing study of the development of expertise in a physics research group. To capture the features of the development of expertise in physics, we present an ethnographic, qualitative study within a physics research group. We utilize video recordings of the physics research group's weekly research meeting and guided interviews with each of eight participants in the group. These data are analyzed using Lave and Wenger's [2] perspective of learning as legitimate peripheral participation within a community of practice. We present data from this study to characterize stages of expertise and posit a trajectory novices take toward expertise.
  Footnotes: [1] Supported by NSF Award # PHY-0802184 [2]Lave J., & Wegner, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. New York: Cambridge University Press
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DJ05:   

Graduate Students' Perceptions of Scientific Collaborations after Researching in China
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Anne W. Collins, University of California, Santa Barbara
8056360189, anne.wrigley@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): Anne E. Emerson, Danielle B Harlow, Julie A Bianchini
  Abstract: Scientific practice is increasingly a collaborative endeavor, especially as the world becomes more global (Katsouyanni, 2008). While research thrives on scientific partnerships, few studies look beyond publication counts and, instead, investigate what constitutes such an alliance (Lee & Bozeman, 2005). Although publications certainly motivate collaboration, studies that measure collaborative networks solely by counting publications are limited since they do not provide a comprehensive picture of the collaborative process. With this in mind, we examined U.S. and Chinese graduate students' motivations and perceptions of collaboration as a result of participation in a research-abroad program in the fields of electron chemistry, catalysis, and electron microscopy. Our findings provide insight into what motivates science partnerships and the features of successful collaborations. Our study has implications for those looking to develop and foster international collaborations.
  Footnotes: Katsouyanni, K. (2008). Collaborative research: accomplishments and potential. Environmental Health, 7(3), 1-7. Lee, S. & Bozeman, B. (2005). The impact of research collaboration on scientific productivity. Social Studies of Science, 35(5), 673‐702.
Sponsored by Danielle B. Harlow
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DJ06:   

Socratic Dialogs and Clicker Use in Upper-Division Mechanics Courses
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Lincoln D. Carr, Colorado School of Mines
303-273-3759, lcarr@mines.edu
  Co-Author(s): Vincent H. Kuo, Patrick B. Kohl, Noah Finkelstein
  Abstract: The general problem of effectively using interactive engagement in non-introductory physics courses remains open. We present a three-year study comparing different approaches to lecturing in an intermediate mechanics course at the Colorado School of Mines. In the first two years, the lectures were modified to include Socratic dialogs between the instructor and students. In the third year, the instructor used clickers and Peer Instruction. All other course materials were nearly identical to an established traditional lecture course. We present results from exams, course evaluations, the CLASS attitude survey, and a new conceptual survey. We observe little change in student exam performance as lecture techniques varied, though students consistently stated clickers were "the best part of the course" from which they "learned the most." Indeed, when using clickers in this course, students were considerably more likely to become engaged than students in CSM introductory courses using the same methods.
  Footnotes: None
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DJ07:   

Light Reflection from a Uniformly Moving Mirror, a General Principle
  Location: HC 3040
  Date: Tuesday, Aug.02
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: J. Ronald Galli, Weber State University
801 393 2965, jrgalli@weber.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: When light is reflected from a uniformly moving mirror, the reflected and incident angles are equal only for special cases. Reasons for this will be presented and a more basic principle of reflection will be suggested.
  Footnotes: None
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