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2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Wednesday, August 03

 

Total Number of Records Found: 9

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FC:   

Innovative Labs for Introductory Courses
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:50AM
  Presider: Tim Grove,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FC01:   

The Mash-up Report: A New Physics Lab Assessment Tool
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 8:40AM
  Author: Larry Bortner, University Of Cincinnati
513-556-2249, bortnelj@ucmail.uc.edu
  Co-Author(s): Carol Fabby
  Abstract: We have developed an online, partial credit multiple choice lab report designed to reduce the student's composition time and virtually eliminate the grader's time. For each section of the report (called a centort), students are presented with snippets that have been previously graded with a rubric, with at least one choice for each level of the rubric. Each snippet is drawn randomly from a pool so that no two students have the same choices for the full centort. Grading is automatic but can be withheld from the student until after a submission deadline.
  Footnotes: None
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FC02:   

Introductory E&M Labs Based on Challenge Projects
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:40AM - 8:50AM
  Author: Michael Burns-Kaurin, Spelman College
404-270-5849, mburns-k@spelman.edu
  Co-Author(s): Paul Camp, Derrick Hylton, Marta McNeese, Natarajan Ravi
  Abstract: We changed the structure of the laboratory portion of the second semester of the calculus-based introductory course to center on two challenge projects, the design of the wiring for a house and the construction of a simple radio. Each challenge is broken down into sub-challenges that each include rounds of planning, performing, analyzing, and interpreting experiments. Moreover, each group typically performs a different experiment and shares the outcome with other groups (distributed expertise). Although the experiments end up similar to the experiments students performed before this change, the experiments are now in the context of complex, ill-formed problems, with the goal of improving the students' skills in the actual process of scientific investigation. This presentation will focus on the implementation of this approach, including some discussion of instructors' impressions and assessment of content knowledge; another presentation will focus on the rationale for this structure. Supported by NSF-CCLI DUE-0837216.
  Footnotes: None
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FC03:   

Video-based Introductory Mechanics Labs Learning Effects
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:50AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Sergio Flores, University of Juarez
(915) 422-3294, seflores@uacj.mx
  Co-Author(s): Juan Ernesto Chavez, Luis Leobardo Alfaro, Maria Dolores Gonzalez, Sergio Miguel Terrazas
  Abstract: Many introductory physics students have understanding problems when they try to learn physics concepts through the knowledge mathematical representations during lab sessions. The research group named Physics and Mathematics in Context from the University of Ciudad, Juarez, Mexico, has developed a research approach based on videos to detect, analyze, and categorize students' understanding of problems to recognize and learn the properties of concepts such as forces as vectors. These videos are projected during the lab sessions to allow a direct interaction between the object knowledge (physical concepts) and the knowledge subject (the students). These videos show the materials, instruments, procedures, and the corresponding description of the cognitive and physical abilities students demand to develop the labs successfully. This didactic design is based on the theories of mathematical representations and visualization. We will show and describe samples of these videos and the corresponding learning effects found during lab sessions.
  Footnotes: None
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FC04:   

The Physics of Rube Goldberg
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Joseph L. Nothnagel, McHenry County College
815-337-5861, joenothnagel@comcast.net
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The popular 1963 board game "Mouse Trap" provided the inspiration for a creative assessment of the first two semesters of a three-semester calculus-based physics course. The game was fashioned from the cartoon images created by Rube Goldberg. The Merriam-Webster dictionary adopted the word "Rube Goldberg" as an adjective defined as accomplishing something simple through complex means. Physics is laden with "complex means" exemplified in the myriad of equations introduced in the first two semesters of classic physics. The lab involves the construction on paper of a "Mouse Trap." Twenty independent steps are to be constructed leading to the dropping of a net on the mouse. Each step must be one of the many equations studied in classic physics. The utility of the equation demonstrated in the action within each step along with complete calculations will be used to validate sufficient input force to output force to move from one step to the next of the mouse trap.
  Footnotes: None
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FC05:   

Lab Experiments Using Radioisotopes with Wide Range of Half-Lives
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: John E. Tansil
Dept. of Physics, Southeast Missouri State University
573.450.4462, jtansil@semo.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: There are two common techniques for experimentally determining the half-life of a radioisotope. The first method involves measuring activity as a function of time and is limited to isotopes whose half-lives are short compared to time of measurement, yet long enough so that activity is well above background during time of measurement (a few minutes in a typical lab period). The second method is for long-lived isotopes and requires measuring activity and calculating the number of radioactive atoms from the known chemical composition of the sample. We have been using two radioisotopes whose half-lives differ by a factor of E14. The short-lived radioisotope is Barium-177m (T = 2.55 min) and the long-lived radioisotope is naturally occurring Potassium-40 (T = 1.277 E9 yr) which is found in a variety of common potassium compounds. We will discuss specific procedures with these lab experiments and how they fit in the overall nuclear science curriculum.
  Footnotes: None
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FC06:   

Teaching Physics Related to an Early Attempt at Medical Imaging
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Dean A. Zollman, Kansas State University
785-532-1619, dzollman@phys.ksu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Sytil K. Murphy, Ebone B Pierce, Johannes v.d. Wirjawan
  Abstract: When President Garfield was shot on July 2, 1881, physicians could not determine the location of the bullet. Alexander Graham Bell proposed that he use his newly invented telephone and another relatively new development, the induction balance, to locate it [1]. This early attempt at nonintrusive medical imaging ultimately failed. The apparatus provides students with a way to learn several aspects of electromagnetism and AC circuits in a context that should be motivating to medical students who are studying physics. Even the reasons for the failure are directly related to understanding magnetic fields. Our progress toward developing a teaching activity on this topic has included creating an induction balance with readily available materials and detecting the location of hidden pieces of metal. This project is funded by NSF under grant DUE 04-26754.
  Footnotes: 1. Alexander Graham Bell ?Upon the Electrical Experiments to determine the location of the Bullet in the body of the late President Garfield and upon the successful form of Induction Balance for the painless detection of Metallic Mass in the Human Body? The American Journal of Science 25, 22-61, 1883
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FC07:   

Using a WiiMote to Track Multiple Objects in Two Dimensions
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Eric Ayars, California State University, Chico
(530) 898-6967, ayars@mailaps.org
  Co-Author(s): Kyle Scully, Alex Skeffington
  Abstract: We will present a method of using the built-in camera on a Wii game controller with LabVIEW to track two-dimensional motion of up to four objects simultaneously in real time. We will show you how to do it (it's CHEAP!) and demonstrate some potential applications of this method to introductory lab experiments.
  Footnotes: None
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FC08:   

Terminal Velocity of High-Altitude Balloon Payloads: Experiment Versus Theory
  Location: HC 3028
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Paul Seifert, Concordia College
218-299-4612, seifert@cord.edu
  Co-Author(s): Gordon McIntosh
  Abstract: The terminal velocity of a high-altitude balloon payload descending under a parachute can be calculated using the Prandtl expression for the drag force and knowing the force of gravity (weight) on the payload. A simple model of the terminal velocity versus altitude has been developed, accounting for the changing density of the atmosphere during descent. This model will be compared to the actual terminal velocity of payloads launched by the University of Minnesota, Morris and ConHAB (Concordia College) balloon groups. We will also compare results between our two different parachute designs. The model and flight data will be used to develop an undergraduate laboratory activity illustrating differences between experimental real-world data and theoretically modeled data.
  Footnotes: None
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