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2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Wednesday, August 03

 

Total Number of Records Found: 9

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FD:   

Physics and Society Education
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 10:00AM
  Presider: Art Hobson,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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FD01:   

Dammit, Jim (Cameron), I'm a Screenwriter, Not a Physicist!
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:00AM - 8:30AM
  Author: Ann G. Merchant, National Academies
202-334-3117, amerchan@nas.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Science at its best is adventurous, creative, imaginative, and passionate. Indeed, given its propensity to explore uncharted territory, science is often the basis for provocative and compelling storylines in both film and television. But beyond good storytelling, entertainment channels possess the very real ability to affect opinions, inform ideas, and even change behavior. Recognizing the power of the popular media to shape society's outlook, in 2008 the National Academy of Sciences launched a new program called The Science & Entertainment Exchange to facilitate the connections between the entertainment industry and top scientists from around the country who can help bring the reality of engaging science to the creative arts. With more than 250 consultations to its credit, The Exchange has spent the last few years working with screenwriters, directors, producers, and set designers to bring more -- and better -- science to theaters and living rooms around the country.
  Footnotes: None
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FD02:   

Using the Performing Arts in Education and Communication of Science
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 8:30AM - 9:00AM
  Author: Brian Schwartz
The Graduate Center of the City University of New York
(212) 817-7521, bschwartz@gc.cuny.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: For the past 10 years, the author and his colleagues have been operating an outreach program for students and the public based on the theme of Science & the Performing Arts. Formal evaluations of the program indicate that using the performing arts to educate and communicate science is very effective in gaining the interest of students and a new audience of adults, typically not biased towards science. Approximately 10 events are presented each year under the heading Science & the Arts (see http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart). In this paper, we include results from an international conference held at the Graduate Center of CUNY in October 2010. The conference had invited sessions on the following themes: 1- Science and Theater; 2- Science and Dance; 3- Science and Music; 4- Science and Films, TV and Radio and 5- Science Festivals and Science Cafes. The program and videorecording of the sessions can be found at www.sciartconference2010.com .
  Footnotes: None
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FD03:   

Global Energy Resources: An Interdisciplinary, General Education Course
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:00AM - 9:10AM
  Author: Ernest R. Behringer, Eastern Michigan University
734-487-8799, ebehringe@emich.edu
  Co-Author(s): Margaret A. Crouch, Rhonda K. Longworth
  Abstract: During fall 2010, we taught a new interdisciplinary course entitled Global Energy Resources: Physics, Philosophy, and Policy. This course fulfills a general education requirement in the area of global awareness. Students were introduced to energy concepts and technologies, theories of distributive justice, and national and international institutions that set and enforce policy, all applied to the distribution and use of global energy resources. Students were asked to complete homework assignments, in-class activities, a midterm exam, a group project, and a final exam. The group project included an oral presentation and written report describing a plan to manage the energy resources of a foreign nation from the present time through 2020. A detailed description of the course will be given, along with a summary of successes and challenges.
  Footnotes: None
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FD04:   

Energy and Public Policy: A Course in Science and Government
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:10AM - 9:20AM
  Author: Walter F. Cuirle, U.S. House Page School
202-225-9023, walter.cuirle@mail.house.gov
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: "Energy and Public Policy" is a one-semester science elective offered by the Page School of the U.S. House of Representatives. The course is a form of project-oriented inquiry: working in small groups, students pick a problem in the area of energy or the environment that they think can be solved by legislation, then they write the legislation. The focus on legislation changes the character of the syllabus. Students want to learn the science they need to solve their problem and they prefer to learn it in the order in which questions arise in their legislative process. The course does not use a conventional textbook. Instead, students are given an electronic library of documents of the sort they might use if they actually worked for a House committee and were drafting legislation.
  Footnotes: None
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FD05:   

Teaching Radiation Literacy and Nature of Science via Inquiry
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:20AM - 9:30AM
  Author: Andy Johnson, Black Hills State University
605-645-3332, andy.johnson@bhsu.edu
  Co-Author(s): Anna Hafele
  Abstract: Most Americans know very little about ionizing radiation, nuclear power, and nuclear waste. What they do know is based on movies, cartoons, and video games. Non-science majors wonder? Will radiation make them radioactive mutants? What about cell phones and microwaves? Is radiation chemicals or waves? To top it all off, many students know very little about atoms. We are developing innovative materials for teaching nonscientists about radiation using inquiry. This approach also teaches students new ways to reason scientifically. I will present some ways we have developed to help students clarify types of radiation and contamination by direct experimentation, understand causes and effects of radiation using innovative online atom simulators, and apply their new knowledge to make sense of radiation health effects and nuclear waste. Find the materials at http://www.camse.org/andy/radiation. The Radiation by Inquiry project is supported by NSF DUE 0942699
  Footnotes: None
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FD06:   

Science in the News
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:30AM - 9:40AM
  Author: Matthew B. Koss, College of the Holy Cross
508-793-2406, mkoss@holycross.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Much of the vital scientific information that we need to know for our personal or civic utility or for its cultural value comes to us via the popular press. How do we negotiate and evaluate all that scientific information in order to know what is true, what is important, and what we are to do? In the course Science in the News, I have attempted to teach key elements of scientific-technical literacy with the methods and effectiveness of the media that provides scientific and technical information to the general public. In this talk I will present a prĂ©cis on this course.
  Footnotes: None
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FD07:   

Can We Deal with Societal Issues in an Introductory Course?
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:40AM - 9:50AM
  Author: Peter Lindenfeld, Rutgers University
609-921-9524, lindenf@physics.rutgers.edu
  Co-Author(s): Suzanne Brahmia
  Abstract: Yes, it is possible to include societal issues in an introductory course. It helps to have a textbook that includes them. Studies show that texts are rarely read, but perhaps this is not completely the fault of the students. A new book (1) attempts to deal with both questions. It includes chapters on Energy in Civilization and Laws and their Limits. It incorporates mathematics as part of the conversation, and includes a Guided Review that encourages reading. Perhaps surprisingly, although it includes material not usually in such books, it is less than half as massive as the standard texts.
  Footnotes: (1) Physics: The First Science, Peter Lindenfeld and Suzanne White Brahmia, Rutgers University Press 2011, www.first.rutgers.edu
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FD08:   

Physics of Energy -- from Uganda to U.S.
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 9:50AM - 10:00AM
  Author: Abigail R. Mechtenberg, University of Michigan
734-975-0724, amechten@Umich.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: We introduce an internationally developed and implemented curriculum that opens the eyes of physics education practitioners to the vast array of teaching and learning possibilities for the application of the physics of energy. This curriculum and research has been implemented in the U.S. and also in Uganda, East Africa, and Liberia West Africa (and now Guatemala). The academic level is suited for undergraduate physicists, engineers, and professional technicians; however, the astute teacher can easily apply this to other students as we have applied it to U.S. junior energy camps. From this innovative and institutionally transforming curriculum, the Ugandan participants built large-scale bicycle electric generators, merry-go-round generators, a back-up hand crank surgical lamp, hydroelectric generator, incinerator generator, and vertical wind turbines from local parts and materials. The U.S. participants have built classroom working devices such as a solar-powered car with i-pod player, steam engine, and many more devices. During our workshops multiple designs have been executed in groups. Participants leave with a clear understanding of the creativity they possess within themselves and realize the importance of (1) the knowledge of physics and (2) ease of designing these devices themselves. Mixing DIY (design it yourself) with the physics of energy has created an unexpected synergy.
  Footnotes: Physics and Society Committee
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