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2010 Summer Meeting

2011 AAPT Summer Meeting
July 30-August 3, 2011
Omaha, Nebraska


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Sessions and Events w/Abstracts

Date: Wednesday, August 03

 

Total Number of Records Found: 5

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GC:   

Laboratories for Astronomy
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 2:20PM
  Presider: Mary Ann Hickman Klassen,
  Co-Presiders(s): None
  Equipment: N/A
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GC01:   

Engineering Innovative Curricula for Inquiry in an Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratory
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:00PM - 1:30PM
  Author: Daniel J. Lyons, University of Wyoming
262-496-5519, danjlyons@gmail.com
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: The literature argues that students do not develop deep understandings of the structure or nature of the scientific discipline of inquiry unless the underlying ideas are taught explicitly. In response the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team has developed an introductory astronomy lab curriculum with a backwards faded-scaffolding approach to support student engagement in authentic inquiry experiences. Backwards faded-scaffolding is a strategy where the conventional and rigidly linear "scientific method" is turned on its head and students are first taught how to create conclusions based on evidence, then how experimental design creates evidence, and only at the end introduces students to -- what we believe is the most challenging part of inquiry -- inventing scientifically appropriate questions. To assess the curriculum we are using the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey and the Test of Astronomy Standards (TOAST).
  Footnotes: Sponsored by Timothy F. Slater, Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team, www.CAPERTeam.com
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GC02:   

Results from a Study of Inquiry in Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 1:30PM - 2:00PM
  Author: Kendra Sibbernsen, Metropolitan Community College
402-738-4752, kjsibbernsen@mccneb.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: This talk will focus on the results from a mixed-method quasi-experimental study that was designed to determine if students in an undergraduate astronomy laboratory increase their understanding of inquiry. A backward-faded scaffold (BFS) format was used for the laboratory exercises. The measure of increase in inquiry was determined by the examining pre-tests and post-tests of the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey, scores on laboratory exercises at the beginning and end of the course, and observations from the instructor. Information will be given outlining how these results are being used to guide recommendations for practice and for further research, including online implementation of the astronomy laboratory exercises and development of a physical science survey laboratory class using the BFS format.
  Footnotes: None
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GC03:   

Balloon Data and Planetary Temperature Profiles
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:00PM - 2:10PM
  Author: Gordon C. McIntosh, University of Minnesota, Morris
(320) 589-6342, mcintogc@morris.umn.edu
  Co-Author(s): None
  Abstract: Atmospheric temperature measurements during a balloon flight provide a basis for the comparison of temperatures and the variation of temperatures with altitude in the atmospheres of solar system bodies. The altitudes and temperatures are measured and transmitted to Earth thorough the StratoSAT system. Data from a launch on the morning of Saturday, 6 November 2010, will be presented and compared to temperature profiles from Mars, Venus, and Titan. The data indicate the effects of the Earth's surface, the lapse rate in the troposphere, the altitude of the tropopause, and the increasing temperature of the stratosphere. These data and comparisons form the basis for an astronomy, meteorology, or Earth science laboratory activity.
  Footnotes: None
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GC04:   

Measuring the Temperature of a Star from Its Continuous Spectrum
  Location: HC 3029
  Date: Wednesday, Aug.03
  Time: 2:10PM - 2:20PM
  Author: John E. Shaw, Northwest Missouri State University
660-562-1636, jshaw@nwmissouri.edu
  Co-Author(s): David Richardson
  Abstract: One way to measure the surface temperature of a star is to measure the ratio of intensities of light through a blue filter compared to a green filter. Assuming the star behaves as an ideal blackbody, Planck's formula can be used to calculate the temperature at the surface of the star. A similar activity can be done in the laboratory by measuring the intensities of light from an incandescent light bulb through infrared, red, green, and blue filters. The students can use the ratio of two of these as a way of determining the temperature of the tungsten filament of the light bulb. A spreadsheet is used to illustrate the predictions of the spectra of a blackbody at different temperatures from Planck's formula.
  Footnotes: None
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