AAPT Winter Meeting 2019 in Houston, TX
 

WM19 Program

Sessions, Panels, Posters, Plenaries, Committee Meetings, and Special Events

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Sessions & Panels

      • Exhibit Hall Open (Monday)

      • EXH07
      • Mon 01/14, 10:00AM - 4:00PM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
  • First Billion Years of a Solar System

      • Accretion: Building New Worlds

      • EA01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • by Allan Treiman
      • Type: Invited
      • The formation of our solar system, 4.6 billion years ago, is understood fairly well because many meteorite samples contain material unaltered since that time. There is agreement on the basic framework -- gravitational collapse of a cloud of gas and dust.Better understanding of the processes of solar system formation relies on physics across a huge range of length and energy scales: from interstellar clouds to lattice defects in ancient crystals, and from nucleosynthesis in supernovae to adhesion among dust grains.
      • Planetary Differentiation in the Early Solar System

      • EA02
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by Walter Kiefer*
      • Type: Invited
      • Earth, Venus, Mars, and Mercury are all differentiated planets, with dense metallic cores at their centers surrounded by rocky mantles and crusts. However, intense early heating either from the radioactive isotope aluminum 26 or by energetic impacts allowed some much smaller objects to also differentiate. Examples include the Moon, which on the basis of Apollo sample evidence had a “magma ocean” in its outer several hundred kilometers and the asteroid 4 Vesta, whose surface is partially covered with rocks formed by erupting magma. This presentation will use evidence from meteorites to explore the process of planetary differentiation and will also discuss how NASA spacecraft such as the Dawn mission to asteroid 4 Vesta, the InSight mission to Mars, and the forthcoming Psyche mission to the metallic asteroid 16 Psyche are contributing to our understanding of planetary differentiation.
      • Bombardment: Shaping Planetary Surfaces and Their Environment

      • EA03
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 5:00PM
      • by David Kring*
      • Type: Invited
      • Apollo missions to the lunar surface and the samples that were returned to Earth revealed the Earth-Moon system was severely bombarded by asteroids and comets during the first billion years of Solar System history. The bombardment resurfaced the Moon, producing the immense impact basins visible from any school. The oldest and largest impact basin is, however, hidden from view on the lunar farside. High-priority goals for NASA’s scientific exploration of the Moon are to determine the age of that impact basin and the cadence of the other impact basins. The Earth was similarly bombarded, but the geologic record of those processes is erased. We rely on the Moon to uncover the early evolution of our own planet, including the environmental conditions during the origin and evolution of life on Earth.
      • Habitability: Producing Conditions Conducive to Life

      • EA04
      • Mon 01/14, 5:00PM - 5:30PM
      • by Edgard Rivera-Valentin*
      • Type: Invited
      • The physical process (e.g., accretion, differentiation, and bombardment) that created the worlds we observe today also led to the creation of at least one world where life has emerged and thrived. Understanding these early processes can help us investigate how habitable environments arose and how such environments evolved over time. The chemical, thermodynamic, and biogeochemical process that led to the emergence of life on Earth within its early habitable environments, may have also occurred on other bodies in our Solar System, such as Mars and the ocean worlds of Jupiter and Saturn. An interdisciplinary understanding of the emergence of life and the environments it developed on can help narrow our search for life in extrasolar systems.
  • 100 Years of Experimental Relativity

      • Einstein's Jury: Trial by Telescope

      • DA01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:30AM
      • by Jeffrey Crilinsten
      • Type: Invited
      • While Einstein’s theory of relativity ultimately laid the foundation for modern studies of the universe, it took a long time to be accepted. Its acceptance was largely due to the astronomy community, which at Einstein’s urging undertook precise measurements to test his astronomical predictions. This paper focuses on astronomers’ attempts to measure the bending of light by the sun’s gravitational field. The work started in Germany and America before Einstein had completed his general theory, which he published during the depths of the First World War. Only a handful of astronomers, including Arthur Stanley Eddington in England, could understand the theory. Most astronomers were baffled by it and focused on testing its empirical predictions. The well-known 1919 British eclipse expeditions that made Einstein famous did not convince most scientists to accept relativity. The 1920s saw numerous attempts to measure light bending, amid much controversy and international competition.
      • Original derivation of Einstein's E=mc2

      • DA04
      • Mon 01/14, 12:10PM - 12:20PM
      • by Ajay Sharma
      • Type: Contributed
      • In his paper Einstein derived DeltaL=Deltamc2 (light energy –mass equation). It has not been completely studied; it is only valid under special conditions of the parameters involved e.g. number of light waves, magnitude of light energy, angles at which waves are emitted and relative velocity v. Einstein considered just two light waves of equal energy, emitted in opposite directions and the relative velocity v uniform. There are numerous possibilities for the parameters which were not considered in Einstein’s derivation. DeltaE=Deltamc2 is obtained from DeltaL=Deltamc2 by simply replacing L by E (all energy) without derivation. If all values of valid parameters are taken into account then the same derivation also gives L Deltamc2 or L =A Deltamc2, where A is a coefficient of proportionality. Thus Einstein’s derivation under valid parameters also predicts that energy emitted may be less than or more than DeltaL=Deltamc2
      • Gamow, Hoyle, Popper and The Big Bang

      • DA05
      • Mon 01/14, 12:20PM - 12:30PM
      • by Svilen Kostov
      • Type: Contributed
      • The birth and rise of the Big Bang model during the 40s, 50s, and its success over the Steady State model in the 60s was, in addition to high drama in the arena of fundamental science, also a milestone test case for the relatively young discipline of philosophy of science. The defining moments of this debate are examined and the role of three larger than life personalities, two in science, George Gamow and Fred Hoyle, and one in philosophy, Karl Popper, are discussed.
      • Modern Eddington Experiment

      • DA02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30PM - 12:00PM
      • by Donald Bruns William Dittrich, Svilen Kostov

      • Type: Invited
      • The Modern Eddington Experiment (MEE) was performed by many teams during the Great American Eclipse in August 2017. The experimental method used by the successful teams will be discussed and compared to the methods used in prior experiments. Three MEE experiments obtained positive results of varying accuracy. The accuracies ranged from similar to previous attempts (10%) to a fantastic result of less than 1% result error and 3% uncertainty error. These results will be summarized, explaining why the best MEE result is 250 times better than ever before. A "MEE Lab Manual" for future eclipse experiments in 2019 and 2024 will be outlined, with the aim to perform the MEE with many college experimental teams in the next great eclipse in 2024.
  • 30 Demos in 60 Minutes

      • 30 Demos in 60 Minutes

      • DB
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 12:30PM
      • by Wendy Adams
      • Type: Panel
      • Our panel of physics teachers will present at least 30 dynamic demonstrations that will engage students in the wonder of science. Presenters will share tips on the setup, materials, procedure, and underlying science concepts so the audience can integratethese demos into their own classrooms.
  • A Day at a School, K-12

      • Physics and After School Programs - Hands On Fun

      • HA01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 1:00PM
      • by Jason Hammond
      • Type: Invited
      • Physics is an unknown science to most elementary school children even though they deal with the laws of physics each and every day. Through robust, hands on after school activities, The Children's Museum of Houston teaches the fundamentals of physics by having our students make rockets, cars, gliders and boats. As they make their machines they are asked to think about such things as Newton's laws of motion, universal gravitation, speed, acceleration, buoyancy and the forces of aerodynamics. Because they are able to engineer a machine and see the machine in action, the physics behind the actions become less abstract and more relatable. Starting in fall 2018, the A'STEAM program will be in 154 sites weekly serving over 6000 kids each week. The age range is 3-12 with two separate curriculums -- one for Pre-K and one for K-7th grade. Each curriculum will have activities related to physics.
      • Portal to the Public at the Children's Museum of Houston

      • HA02
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:30PM
      • by Gretchen Schmaltz
      • Type: Invited
      • Portal to the Public Network (PoPNet) represents a system of over 50 museums, informal science education (ISE) institutions, and universities that are united in their effort to connect scientists with their public audiences. The program, created in 2007 with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), assists more than 50 ISE centers in North America seeking to create opportunities for researchers to engage in face-to-face conversations with their visitorship. Through these outreach efforts, scientists can foster a deeper appreciation for science and its practical applications in society. PoPNet provides a malleable framework that ISE institutions can adapt to suit their unique needs and goals. In this talk, I'll discuss implementation of PoPNet at the Children's Museum of Houston which includes the building of relationships with scientists within the Houston Community, professional development offered to assist them in communicating complex concepts, and the types of science-specific events that best serve children and families at our museum.
      • Taking Solar Cookers to Schools

      • HA03
      • Tue 01/15, 1:30PM - 1:40PM
      • by Shawn Reeves
      • Type: Contributed
      • The author has taken solar cookers to middle and elementary schools as an outdoor lesson to study topics such as infrared and visible light; measuring power, temperature, and light; ray-tracing; reflection, transmission, absorption, and emission of light; pasteurization; cooking; and engineering. Solving problems like making food and pasteurizing water shine a different light on physics than its war-era traditional topics and thus appeal to different interests. We can (should?) flavor experiences in physics education before formal introduction to change the expectations and even the trajectory of the field.
      • Improving Visual Spatial Reasoning in Middle Schoolers Using Minecraft

      • HA04
      • Tue 01/15, 1:40PM - 1:50PM
      • by Barrett Frank
      • Type: Contributed
      • The Minecraft Gaming Engine is an expansive virtual space that appeals to a wide range of users. With few in game limitations, and support for server administrators, Minecraft is potentially the perfect medium for interactive curriculum development. In particular, visual spatial reasoning curricula could greatly benefit from the use of a virtual space for students to explore. Prototype modules which test rotations and 2D to 3D transformations were developed and play-tested by middle school students in two-day summer camps. These modules, which will be improved upon in future iterations, received positive and negative feedback which will be considered in future iterations.
      • No Paper Here: Leverage Computers Full Time in Physics Instruction

      • HA05
      • Tue 01/15, 1:50PM - 2:00PM
      • by Brian Geyer
      • Type: Contributed
      • An overview of how a teacher in a one to one device school uses a LMS, Google applications, and symbolic manipulation software to completely eliminate paper from the classroom. The talk will cover lectures, group work, classic problems, large real-world datasets, classic inquiry labs, and all other aspects of classwork and teaching duties.
      • LIGO in the Classroom

      • HA06
      • Tue 01/15, 2:00PM - 2:10PM
      • by Amber Strunk
      • Type: Contributed
      • The LIGO Hanford Observatory has a long history of outreach in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. An important part of our outreach is going into schools and working with students in their classrooms. Approximately half of the outreach performed by staff at LIGO Hanford is performed outside of the observatory and in classrooms themselves. From Infrared cameras with First Graders to Gravitational Waves with High Schoolers outreach in schools is a powerful experience for students and scientists. Learn about the types of activities we do, why these visits are so important and how to get someone from LIGO to visit your school.
      • The Sanford Underground Research Facility School Presentation Program

      • HA07
      • Tue 01/15, 2:10PM - 2:20PM
      • by Peggy Norris June Apaza, Becky Bundy, Julie Dahl, Debra Wolf

      • Type: Contributed
      • The Education and Outreach Team at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, brings science to life for students in classrooms across the region. Students may spin marbles to model particle accelerators, explore the bending of light in gravitational fields, or learn about the science of boreholes. Elementary students may even dress like scientists and imagine themselves working nearly a mile underground. Both teachers and students enjoy the dynamic, engaging presentations delivered by the Education and Outreach Team. Our nine (and counting) school presentations are part of a three-pronged approach to inspire and prepare students for the science and engineering careers of the future.
  • Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

      • Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

      • EXH05
      • Sun 01/13, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
      • Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

      • EXH09
      • Mon 01/14, 3:00PM - 3:30PM

      • Type: Exhibit Hall
  • Afternoon Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - Celestron PowerSeeker 70EQ Telescope

      • Afternoon Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - Celestron PowerSeeker 70EQ Telescope

      • EXH06
      • Sun 01/13, 3:40PM - 3:45PM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
      • The power seeker 70eq telescope is a Great way to open up the Wonders of the universe to the aspiring astronomer! it is designed to give the first-time buyer a Great combination of quality, value, features, and power. Set up is quick and easy with no tools necessary. View the stars with slow motion controls for smooth tracking. Erect image optics are excellent for terrestrial and astronomical use. Fully coated glass optical components are covered with high transmission coatings for enhanced image brightness and clarity while the 3x Barlow lens triples the magnifying power of each eyepiece. An accessory tray is provided for easy storage of your accessories. Raffles will take place in the AAPT exhibit hall. Tickets can be purchased at the AAPT registration desk. Tickets must be purchased 30 minutes before the raffle. Must be present to win.
  • Afternoon Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - Raffle: Holy Stone HS110D FPV RC Drone with 720P HD Camera

      • Afternoon Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - Raffle: Holy Stone HS110D FPV RC Drone with 720P HD Camera

      • EXH11
      • Mon 01/14, 3:15PM - 3:20PM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
      • FOV 120° 720P HD FPV CAMERA: This high-quality camera captures memorable moments. See the world through the eyes of a bird on your phone. ALTITUDE HOLD: It allows the rc quacopter to suspend in mid-air even with your hands off the joystick, for hands-free hovering. Easy, stable flight experience makes this a perfect drone for beginners, kids, starters, newbies, etc. HEADLESS MODE: Orientation of the drone is in relation to the pilot, easier to control and fly back when the drone is out of sight, you’ll have total control for a straightforward flying experience. Raffle will take place in the AAPT exhibit hall. Must be present to win.. Tickets must be purchased 30 minutes before the raffle. Must be present to win.
  • Approaches to Recruiting Women in Physics

      • How to Strengthen Physics by Making it Inclusive

      • BA01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Chandralekha Singh
      • Type: Invited
      • Despite some efforts to encourage women to pursue a career in physics, the percentage of women majoring in physics remains low. There are several frameworks that focus on the dearth of women in physics, which take into account motivational characteristics, e.g., interest in physics, self-efficacy, mindset about intelligence, sense of belonging, and identity as a physicist. We performed a longitudinal analysis of these motivational characteristics of female and male college students in large physics courses along with their performance in those courses. Among other findings, our data suggest that female students had lower physics self-efficacy than male students, even when controlling for performance. Moreover, this self-efficacy gap continued to grow throughout the college introductory physics course sequence. Based upon these findings, we implemented short in-class activities that were designed to improve the inclusivity in the physics courses and address issues related to students' sense of belonging, self-efficacy and intelligence mindset. We found that female students in physics classes who participated in these activities performed significantly better than those who did not, and they were also less likely to withdraw from the courses. We thank the National Science Foundation for support.
      • The Art of Scientific Outreach

      • BA02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Shohini Ghose Eden Hennessey

      • Type: Invited
      • Research has shown that the low representation of women in science and engineering has a negative impact on scientific innovation and the economy. However, much like the debate around climate change, despite the overwhelming evidence showing the challenges and biases that hinder women’s full participation in science, there is still no strong widespread push for structural and cultural change. We describe some initiatives that combine art, science and research to change the conversation and build awareness that can lead to a more inclusive science community.
      • On the Road to Equality: UK Efforts for Women in Physics

      • BA03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 3:00PM
      • by Jessica Wade
      • Type: Invited
      • The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the increasing engagement of the UK physics community with recruitment, progression, and retention of women at all stages of their involvement with physics. Recognizing the under-representation of certain groups, the programs look to identify barriers to participation and to use evidence-based research to create models of good practice that break down these barriers and encourage and engage diverse groups. The flagship activity is Project Juno, but other initiatives look to support all scientists in their careers; including people from the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities. For more than 25 years there has been little change in the proportion of girls studying physics post-16. Only around a fifth of final year high school students are girls, despite similar success between the genders in previous physics qualifications. We will discuss the extensive research and evidence-based resources and action developed by the Institute of Physics.
      • Women in Physics in Pakistan: Update and Looking Forward

      • BA04
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:30PM
      • by Anisa Qamar
      • Type: Invited
      • The working group of women in physics in Pakistan has been participating in the ICWIP conferences since 2002 and highlighting the issues related to women physicists in different meetings of physics forums. Various studies related to the issues have been made by the Centre for Physics Education and presented in the ICWIP 2011 and 2014 conferences. The Regional Conference on Women in Physics 2016, was Organized in Pakistan and it had influenced greatly upon the thinking of women physicists especially the young ones. We were able to form working groups at some universities. In this presentation, we will discuss what strategies are in the pipeline to promote physics education among young girls. We will include the difficulties faced by the working group due to some socio-economic barriers for the girls that are needed to be addressed. The United Nation Report on the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 which picturizes a grim socio-economic situation in Pakistan and forces the young women to stay away from higher education. However, the urban girls are asserting to continue higher education but we find disproportionate number exists largely. The working women group also contacting national and international forum for obtaining support for young and talented girls.
  • Assessing the Effectiveness of Laboratory Curricula

      • Shifting Introductory Physics Labs from Lecture Support to Scientific Reasoning

      • by Roger Key
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics departments have long entrusted physics labs to reinforce lectures, but research indicates that the traditional lab is ill-suited for this purpose. The question then arises: Can the physics lab be re-purposed to target other learning objectives? Recently, we have shifted the focus of introductory calculus-based labs toward professional science and engineering practices. Drawing from the ?eld of industrial manufacturing, we developed lab activities that elevated statistical analysis as a decision-making tool. To span a full semester, we incorporated a new lab model developed at the University of Cincinnati that focused on scientific reasoning. We are currently conducting a controlled study of this new lab curriculum involving over 100 Fresno State students. The following research questions guides the project design: (1) Does the new curriculum design promote scienti?c reasoning and statistical analysis? (2) Does shifting from concept-based labs diminish student performance on lecture content?
      • Comparative Analysis of a Redesigned Upper-Division Physics Lab.

      • by Charles Ramey II
      • Type: Contributed
      • Communication is an important skill in all fields of STEAM, including physics lab courses. At Texas Tech University, we have recently redesigned the Modern Physics Lab to develop students’ written communication competence, among other goals. To supportstudents’ writing skills, we implemented the activity Letters Home in the lab, and conducted a case study of 6 students to characterize the impact of a transformed laboratory. We used the AAPT guidelines to inform our development of an a priori coding scheme with 8 unique categories that highlight learning outcomes. We also used a linguistic software called LIWC to assess the data’s language variables. From our analysis, we found the coding scheme characterizes the dimensions of scientific communication that is suggest by AAPT, and that there are structural and content similarities between the letters and lab reports.
      • Assessing the Transformation of Introductory Physics Labs at Cornell

      • EB01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • by Emily Smith Martin Stein, N.G. Holmes

      • Type: Invited
      • At Cornell University, we are in the process of transforming the labs for the calculus-based introductory physics sequences. The redesign aligns with the Laboratory Guidelines by AAPT and has focused on shifting the labs from ones that reinforce physics content to ones that emphasize experimentation. In this talk, I will discuss results from a single course where all students attended the same lecture and discussion sections, had the same homework and exams, but attended one of the two types of labs. I will describe how we compared these two lab curricula on the impacts on students’ physics content knowledge, how students spent their time in lab, and students’ attitudes and beliefs about experimental physics. We find that labs designed to teach experimentation did not impact students’ knowledge of physics content, and, encouragingly, engaged students in expert-like experimentation practices and improved their attitudes and beliefs about experimental physics.
      • Assessing Scientific Practices (and Concepts!) in the Lab

      • EB02
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by James Laverty
      • Type: Invited
      • Many recent national reports in K-12 and higher education have highlighted the importance of students learning to do science, not just know science. This elevation of doing physics to the same level of importance as the concepts of physics is significantly shifting the way we think about what we want students to learn. This change in learning goals pushes us to think differently about what we assess: It's not just what students know, but also what they can do with their knowledge. Lab courses provide an opportunity to assess what our students can do with their physics knowledge, sometimes in ways that we can't assess them in a lecture course. In this talk, I will discuss the idea of scientific practices, how we can assess them (when paired with physics concepts) in a lab, and what this implies about how we might change lab instruction.
      • Using Assessments to Develop Thinking Habits and Determine Lab Effectiveness

      • EB03
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 4:40PM
      • by Kathleen Koenig Krista Wood, Larry Bortner, Lei Bao

      • Type: Contributed
      • Many years ago we revised our physics labs from verification labs to those which are inquiry-based. The learning outcomes were rewritten around the AAPT Laboratory Guidelines as well as our own set of outcomes for specific scientific reasoning abilities.This presentation will showcase the variety of formative and summative assessments used throughout the course. These include scoring rubrics provided to students to guide their in-class lab records and lab report writing, pre-lab quizzes, final lab course exam, and a scientific reasoning assessment. Data will be presented which demonstrates the importance of these assessments for guiding students’ behavior and building thinking habits, as well as measuring the effectiveness of our labs in meeting the desired outcomes. *Partially supported by NSF IUSE DUE 1431908
      • Assessment of Scientific Reasoning Sub-skill: Control of Variables*

      • EB04
      • Mon 01/14, 4:40PM - 4:50PM
      • by Krista Wood Kathleen Koenig, Lei Bao

      • Type: Contributed
      • Scientific reasoning (SR) skills are necessary for conducting scientific inquiry. To evaluate student development of SR skills, we developed an assessment grounded in the Lawson Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (CTSR) that measures a group of SR sub-skills. We are focusing on the control of variables (COV) sub-skill because it is foundational for engaging in scientific inquiry as well as for decision making. We will present a set of nine COV questions that were tested at an R-1 institution and a two-year college. This set of COV questions can be utilized to assess students’ development of COV skills at low, intermediate, and high levels, which is a finer grain measurement than available on the CTSR. *Partially supported by NSF IUSE DUE 1431908
      • The Physics Lab Inventory of Critical thinking

      • EB05
      • Mon 01/14, 4:50PM - 5:00PM
      • by Natasha Holmes Cole Walsh, Katherine Quinn

      • Type: Contributed
      • Many instructors and education researchers are developing new lab curricula and pedagogies for teaching scientific practices such as critical thinking and experimentation skills. As we develop ways of teaching these skills, we must also consider ways of evaluating them. I will introduce the Physics Lab Inventory of Critical thinking (PLIC), a closed-response assessment for probing student development of critical thinking skills as related to introductory physics experimentation. I will outline the development and validation of the PLIC and present preliminary results of data collected from thousands of students across the country.
      • Introductory Physics Laboratory Curriculum on West Campus at Valencia College

      • EB06
      • Mon 01/14, 5:00PM - 5:10PM
      • by Irina Struganova
      • Type: Contributed
      • I am going to share an “open lab” approach we are using for the lab components of all introductory physics courses offered on West Campus at Valencia College. The approach allows to afford a better equipment, simplifies modernization of the curriculum, and promotes engaging and collaborative learning. Specific details will be shared during the presentation.
      • Taxonomy of Teaching Practices During Group Projects in Lab Courses*

      • EB07
      • Mon 01/14, 5:10PM - 5:20PM
      • by Dimitri Dounas-Frazer Laura Ríos, Heather Lewandowski

      • Type: Contributed
      • Compared to other formal learning environments in undergraduate physics programs, multiweek group projects in lab courses give rise to unique interactions between students, their peers, their instructors, and apparatus. What does teaching look like in these contexts? How do instructors change their teaching practices as students transition from proposing project topics to carrying out experiments and reporting on results? To answer these and related questions, we conducted a multiple case study of group project implementations in upper-division labs at five universities. In this presentation, we draw on data from interviews and surveys with instructors and students to identify a variety of teaching practices. We further describe the intended purposes and perceived impacts of these practices. Preliminary data analysis suggests that group projects may be a shared endeavor in which students and instructors have asymmetric apprenticeship-style roles and responsibilities.
      • Developing an Assessment Plan for Upper-Division Laboratory Courses

      • EB08
      • Mon 01/14, 5:20PM - 5:30PM
      • by Patricia Allen
      • Type: Contributed
      • "AAPT Recommendations for the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory Curriculum" and "Phys21: Preparing Physics Students for 21st Century Careers" offer tangible outcomes that can be adapted to individual programs and courses. However, developing or modifying an assessment plan for a course or program can be a daunting task, especially if it is the first time doing so. In-house rubrics for lab courses developed by the author, together with external measures (like E-CLASS: Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics), help evaluate student performance in upper-level physics labs. An example of how a recommended outcome from AAPT/APS can be tailored to a specific lab course, along the appropriate rubric and sample results, will be presented and discussed. Suggestions for those starting to assess lab courses will also presented.
  • Assessment Practices in Introductory Courses for the Life Sciences

      • Feedback Loop Connecting IPLS Course Transformation and Assessment Data

      • EC01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • by Patricia Soto
      • Type: Invited
      • Course transformation benefits from the feedback loop connecting to assessment data. The challenge in the process stems from the choice of the assessment tool, the interpretation of the output metrics, and the mechanisms to re-design each iteration of the course based on assessment outcomes. At Creighton University, we have implemented a standalone lab IPLS course that incorporates best practices from physics education research and recommendations from the American Association of Physics Teachers. The students enrolled in the course score at or above the historical average in our physics department in standardized assessment tests and show a positive outlook of the physics lab course as indicated by attitudinal surveys. Also, students’ performance meets the expectations of the institutional requirements of core courses. The course has demonstrated to be instructor transferable. I will discuss the strategies implemented to reach the current level of course transformation with an emphasis on the role of assessment.
      • Does it Stick? Assessing the Long-term Impact of IPLS

      • EC02
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by Catherine Crouch Benjamin Geller, Nathaniel Peters, Jonathan Solomon, Chandra Turpen

      • Type: Invited
      • Introductory Physics for Life Science (IPLS) courses seek to (1) equip life science students with skills and reasoning strategies that will be important for their later work in upper level biology courses and biology research environments, and (2) fosterattitudes that physics is relevant and connected to the life sciences. Although assessment of whether these goals are accomplished has been done within IPLS courses, little has been done of the long-term impact of an IPLS course. In this talk we describe results from the first year of an exploratory three-year study that examines student reasoning (from written biology coursework) and attitudes (from surveys and case study interviews) in intermediate biology courses, comparing students with and without IPLS. Preliminary results suggest that the skills and attitudes that IPLS is designed to cultivate do persist into later courses, although the sample size from one year of data is small.
      • Design, Implementation, and Assessment of a New IPLS Course at UNC-CH

      • EC03
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 5:00PM
      • by Duane Deardorff Laurie McNeil, Alice Churukian, Colin Wallace, Daniel Young

      • Type: Invited
      • At UNC-CH we have completely redesigned our IPLS sequence that enrolls ~500 students each semester. Our new courses operate in an interactive lecture/studio format, in which students spend nearly all their class time in pairs or small groups working on activities designed according to PER findings. We eliminated topics with little or no connection to biology (e.g. projectile motion) in favor of topics highly relevant to the life sciences (e.g. nonlinear stress-strain). Whenever possible the class activities make use of authentic biological data. Assessment in this course includes a variety of formative and summative measures. Student learning gains on concept inventories show significant improvement over those in the previous version of the courses. Feedback from students and instructors has been generally positive, and student performance on course exams has met or exceeded that in previous years. Details of these assessment practices and instructional materials will be shared in this talk and are also available for use at other institutions.
  • Astronomy Education Research

      • Creating Simulated Astronomical Experiences for Students in a Portable Planetarium

      • ED01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • by Beau Hartweg
      • Type: Invited
      • A qualitative case study was conducted to understand the experiences of undergraduate students who participated in a live-interactive portable planetarium program that used a simulated immersive visual environment. To that end, the study specifically looked at the ways students participated in and interacted with the planetarium; how they described their experiences; what connections to outside events or experiences could they make after participating in the program; and in what ways were their experiences educative, miseducative, or noneducative. The findings showed that students interacted with the planetarium program in a variety of ways that allowed them to develop an understanding of the content. Participants also made several connections between the planetarium lesson and their prior life experiences, which led to new insights. The data showed that the majority of experiences were educative, which resulted in participants having improved perceptions of astronomy, and engaging in related activities independently of the lesson.
      • The Benefits of Collaborative Exams in Promoting Student Learning

      • ED02
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by Scott Miller
      • Type: Invited
      • Collaborative, two-stage exams are becoming more popular in physics and astronomy courses, and their benefits in terms of collaborative learning have been reported in the field of physics. In a two-stage exam, students first complete the exam individually, then retake all or part of the exam within a group, where peer discussion ensues before arriving at a common answer. I’ll present data collected from over 500 students enrolled in introductory astronomy courses at Sam Houston State University. First, I’ll compare student learning gains for two question sets (one set asked as part of a group exam and the other only answered individually), administered first during semester exams, then again during a final exam. I’ll also discuss student interactions during the group portions of the exams in an effort to investigate the processes in play that lead students to arrive at a group consensus before choosing an answer.
      • The University Of North Texas Astronomy Laboratory Program…Providing Hands-On Astronomy to Over 2,000 Students Yearly

      • ED03
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 5:00PM
      • by Ron DuIulio
      • Type: Invited
      • Twenty years ago, the astronomy program at the university of North Texas, located in Denton, Texas- just north of Dallas, matriculated just over 300 students through an undergraduate, non-science major astronomy course. Over the past decade, an average of 2,000 students completed the series of laboratory exercises in conjunction with their class lectures. This growth provides a testament to the success of the model that we’ve developed. I will share some the lab techniques we utilize, as well as the equipment that we’ve assembled to complete the task of providing hands-on laboratory experiences to teach each, and every one of, the students. Included within my presentation will be examples of how we hope to expand using internet technology blended with face-to-face, hands on experiences.
      • Astronomy and Physics to Non-Specialist Audiences: An Informal Approach

      • ED04
      • Mon 01/14, 5:00PM - 5:10PM
      • by Edio da Costa Junior* Bruno Fernandes, João Cordeiro, Marina Santos

      • Type: Contributed
      • Several astronomical topics are taught in basic education. Also, researchers have shown that astronomical observations can contribute to science dissemination and teaching of Astronomy and Physics and can support teachers and students. In this way, the debate on the topic is important and should be instigated both in an non-academic scope as well as in the scope of teachers and students training. Based on this, a popular project about astronomy has been in development since 2012. More than 8000 people with different levels of scientific knowledge have attended the activities. This article's main objective is to identify elements that can culminate with the effectiveness of the observation activities performed with a lay audience. In addition, it seeks to share empirical knowledge obtained with the development of the project and to encourage groups, academic or otherwise, to develop similar astronomical activities in formal and non-formal educational environments.
      • What Was Kepler Looking For, and Why Didn’t Galileo Respond?

      • ED05
      • Mon 01/14, 5:10PM - 5:20PM
      • by Richard Hechter
      • Type: Contributed
      • An examination of the literature reveals that Kepler wrote to Galileo asking for assistance in measurements of the, ‘second star in the handle of the big dipper’. That’s pretty cool! In a Grade 9 general science class we used Kepler’s letter, and Galileo’s lack of response to him, as the context to introduce a story behind the science of some basic astronomical concepts. Using accessible astronomy software, and coupled with a critical evaluation of the historical record to locate where Kepler may have been when he wrote Galileo, we began to explore the night sky as Kepler would have seen it. Through these experiences students learned and related astronomical concepts to Kepler’s letter to develop hypotheses as to what may have interested him in Mizar, and rationalize why Galileo did not respond. This presentation will share the tenets of this activity, and briefly share the student experiences within it.
      • Engaging Physics Students in Aerospace Engineering Through Model Rocketing

      • ED06
      • Mon 01/14, 5:20PM - 5:30PM
      • by Osman Guler
      • Type: Contributed
      • Learn how to engage students in Aerospace Engineering and defense industry, training the next generation of talent which will enable them to design their own space crafts, commercial airliners, unmanned airplanes, and be the first astronauts who will be going to Mars by using existing makerspace technology tools, such as laser cutter, 3D printers etc. The presenter will also be showing a couple of model rockets that was built by the students and share some best practices of how to start, support, keep track, and successfully maintain the sustainability of the effective student recruitment for students team.
  • Best Practices in Educational Technology

      • The Physics of MRI with Classroom Experiments

      • EE01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • by Sanaz Taghizadeh
      • Type: Invited
      • Throughout the past year I have worked with both clinical and desktop MRIs. With many students planning to pursue a career in medicine, it is the responsibility of physics teachers to instruct upon the concepts of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In this talkwe investigate the physics and clinical details of MRI. I provide an overview of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and discuss how nuclei interact with magnetic fields to produce images. I also share my results from working on a desktop MRI apparatus and demonstrate how it can be used to create MR Images with students during a single class period. Included are answers to common questions, a review of safety hazards, and interesting facts that only insiders know.
      • Writing 100 Introductory Physics Simulations in a Year?

      • EE02
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by Andrew Duffy
      • Type: Invited
      • At the last winter meeting, I got the crazy idea of writing 100 HTML5 simulations in a year (the count was at 64 as of late August). In this talk, I will report on whether I reached that goal of 100, show some examples of the simulations, and discuss howthey are used at Boston University. Uses include bringing physics to life in the classroom, incorporating them into homework assignments, integrating them into an e-book on the TopHat platform, and also adding to the interactive nature of a free online course for high school students on edX. This work also relates to a NSF-funded project involving A/B testing of simulations vs. no simulations, or simulations vs. hands-on labs, and I will report on the outcomes of some of that work.
      • Developing a Project-based Computational Physics Course Grounded in Expert Practice

      • EE03
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 5:00PM
      • by Timothy Atherton Christopher Burke

      • Type: Invited
      • We describe a project-based computational physics course developed using a backwards course design approach and based on a research study of expert computational problem-solving in physics. These insights were distilled into a rubric for professional practice in computational physics, which enabled us to design a course intended to allow students to acquire these skills. We will report on the initial iterations of the class and identify items for further improvement. Additionally, broader implications for how teaching computation can be informed by professional practice will be discussed.
      • Designing Smartphone Physics Experiment

      • EE04
      • Mon 01/14, 5:00PM - 5:10PM
      • by Sally Akca Sibel Ozturk, Turkan Argin

      • Type: Contributed
      • Smartphones have been an important part of modern life. They have been also used as learning tools to aid school assignments as a calculator, clicker or timer. In this presentation, we will share different smartphone physics experiments, which can be done at home or during class time by students. The initial results of the experiments show the students’ engagement and creativity of using daily life materials as lab materials are positively increased during these lab activities. The students showed their creativity not only during the experiment design process but also during the video presentation phase. During the presentation, we will share how students can use smart phones to collect data and data analysis process. In addition to that, the experiment list will be shared which includes the lab activities of elevator acceleration measurement, free fall calculation, pendulum analysis, circular motion and, centrifugal acceleration.
      • High School Physics Lab Curriculum Using Smartphones

      • EE05
      • Mon 01/14, 5:10PM - 5:20PM
      • by ShengChiang Lee Savannah Grunhard, Zainil Charania

      • Type: Contributed
      • The purpose of our research was to develop a low-cost and sustainable physics lab curriculum for implementation in Bibb County, GA, public high schools. The lack of sufficient funding for proper lab equipment and qualified teachers disadvantages students. The pedagogical approach of our curriculum is student-centered and inquiry-based. These activities utilize smartphone sensors in place of typical laboratory sensors. The use of existing smartphones in an educational setting serves to engage students and encourages them to explore physics in their everyday lives without adding any financial burden to school budget. We gathered data from volunteers in order to assess our curriculum and adjust it to meet students’ needs. The curriculum includes student activities (with instructor manuals) and instructions for both class demonstrations and construction of DIY apparatuses.
      • Creating Sites of Disciplinary Knowledge: Integrating Physics and Oral Communication

      • EE06
      • Mon 01/14, 5:20PM - 5:30PM
      • by Jonathan Weidow Hans Malmström, Jonas Enger, Magnus Karlsteen

      • Type: Contributed
      • The integration of physics with communication education has the potential to create a symbiotic relationship where students learn to communicate physics, while also communicating to learn physics. This paper presents pedagogical reflections from a first-year physics course combining the application of CAD, 3D-printing and oral communication. Students were tasked with conceiving, designing, and printing a plastic toy demonstrating a specific physical/mathematical phenomenon. Concurrently, the students prepared an A0-poster presentation focusing on the process from conception to finished toy, highlighting the physics and/or mathematics in question. Here, the teacher team discuss how the poster, the presentation, and the learning process leading up to it enabled students to co-construct “sites of disciplinary knowledge” and how, at a fundamental level, “the norms, epistemologies, and values” of the physics discipline were appropriated by the students. (1)
  • Drones and VR: Examples of Emerging Educational Technologies Across the World

      • VR as a Medium for Physics Education

      • DC01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:30AM
      • by Daniel Wickeroth
      • Type: Invited
      • With the advent of the second hype around Virtual Reality (the first having occurred in the late 90s) VR is currently again being widely discussed as a medium for education in general, and physics education specifically. This talk will illuminate the challenges and chances of using VR for this purpose by giving an overview of the technology itself and its use at the University of Cologne. Therefore, a brief introduction into VR will be given, and a carefully chosen subset of the current VR hardware will be discussed. We will show educational projects at the university of cologne with a focus on Physics in Biology and Engineering Context, including fluid dynamics simulation and customized collaboration techniques for heterogeneous hardware configurations. Finally, we will provide examples that a modern Game Engine that can be downloaded and used for free is actually a simple and very powerful way to get started in Virtual Reality.
      • Drones are Fascinating -- And They Carry a Lot of Physics

      • DC02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 12:00PM
      • by Andre Bresges
      • Type: Invited
      • Drones are literally everywhere. Once expensive toys, they rapidly became serious tools for filmmakers and hobbyists. Currently, we see them entering the mass market as a lifestyle device, supplying countless numbers of youtube channels with video footage. Their attractivity for students makes them a good tool for teachers to deliver lessons in physics. We use the Airblock Drone in introductory courses of mechanics to apply Newton's Laws to win a classroom competition, the "Drone Petanque". Students can measure the speed and mass of the airflow that is necessary to keep the drone maintaining altitude, and put it in relation to its mass. In hovercraft mode, they can measure the trust that the fans produce directly and put it in relation to its mass and acceleration. Using Vernier Video Physics or another videography tool, students can estimate the acceleration, cruise speed, and braking distance of the drone. They combine all their knowledge when they programme a route for the drone using the SCRATCH programming language. The task is to program the drone to fly along a course using only "dead reckoning", alas flying a given direction for a given time, and land as close as possible to a target. Since no GPS and optic guidance is available, student's knowledge about speed, acceleration, and thrust manipulation is essential to win. This marks the end of a STEAM Physics course that combines physics, engineering and programming skills to win in our "Drone Petanque" Competition.
      • 1000’ Classroom: How 3D Printing and Drones Got Us There

      • DC03
      • Mon 01/14, 12:00PM - 12:10PM
      • by Derek Segesdy Josh Lake

      • Type: Contributed
      • Encouraging students to truly visualize the interplay of gravity and air resistance on objects in free fall can be challenging, especially if you teach at a school that doesn’t allow you on the roof. Rather than bringing students to a high bridge or structure, we took to the skies by unleashing the power and control of commercially available drones. This talk will focus on the design and use of a 3D printed box and laser-cut acrylic pieces to construct a functional ‘drone dropper.’ Attaching the box to the base of a DJI Phantom allowed us to bring students’ payloads up dozens or hundreds of meters, drop them repeatedly, and take meaningful data. Student payloads included balls of different masses, student designed parachutes, Arduino imaging equipment, and a Doppler Effect demonstration. The results are lively and exciting outdoor experiments that students enjoy and remember, contributing significantly to their learning outcomes.
      • Communicating Special Relativity Through Simulation in Virtual Reality*

      • DC04
      • Mon 01/14, 12:10PM - 12:20PM
      • by Jared Canright Peter Shaffer

      • Type: Contributed
      • The What Is Relativity project is a virtual reality (VR) special relativity simulator, visualizer, and educational tool in development based on MIT Game Lab's OpenRelativity package for the Unity game engine. With GPU-based shaders used for graphics in gaming, relativistic effects can be simulated for objects undergoing arbitrary motion. What Is Relativity is intended as a formal and informal educational tool to teach special relativity using laboratory-like experiences, with the speed of light and progression of time controllable to allow for detailed examination of relativistic effects. Here, we present some details of the What Is Relativity engine's adaptation from OpenRelativity and describe the development and initial educational efficacy test results of instructional scenes built in the engine.
  • Early Career Teacher Experiences - Voices from the Field

      • Early Career Teacher Experiences - Voices from the Field

      • GA
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 10:00AM
      • by Hunter Close
      • Type: Panel
      • Come hear the various experiences of new physics teachers in the region as they reflect on the beginning of their careers. What experiences have been the most rewarding, or the most challenging? What aspects of their physics teacher preparation have turned out to be the most valuable, or the least valuable? What advice do they have for physics teacher candidates? What advice do they have for faculty working in physics teacher preparation?
  • Effective Departmental Self Study and External Evaluation

      • Effective Departmental Self Study and External Evaluation

      • GB
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 10:00AM
      • by Toni Sauncy
      • Type: Panel
  • Effective Practices in Educational Technology

      • Effective and Efficient Feedback on Lab Reports Using Video Comments

      • FA01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 6:40PM
      • by Bradley McCoy
      • Type: Contributed
      • Competent writers hone their craft by receiving and incorporating feedback on their writing. This applies to technical writing as well as any other form of writing. Yet, on writing assignments in physics classes, such as lab reports, students often receive little usable feedback. In this talk, I will demonstrate how to use video comments captured by the software Snagit to give students direct feedback on their lab report. Video comments take approximately the same amount of time as written comments, while giving much more detailed comments, allowing students the opportunity to make more significant strides in their technical writing skills.
      • Effectiveness of Physclips and Physlets in Undergraduate Teaching

      • FA02
      • Mon 01/14, 6:40PM - 6:50PM
      • by Adriana Predoi-Cross
      • Type: Contributed
      • I will discuss ways in which undergraduate teaching can be enhanced by an effective use of Physlets (Java applets) and Physclips. Being multimedia modules based on animations and video clips, Physclips can be used during class to introduce new concepts and relate them to experiences from day to day life, possibly together with clickers that can probe the students’ understanding of the topic. Physclips can also be used in a flipped classroom setting as part of the required “before class” student activities. Recently, physlets have been developed for many areas of physics. Their applicability and online accessibility makes them easy to include in lectures. Providing upfront their web links enables the students to use the physlets during class, on their mobile devices, to extend case studies and explore different applications of the new concepts by varying physical quantities such as, for example, speed, gravitation, friction, mass, and graphing the results.
      • Engaging Students with Interactive Astronomy iPad Tutorials

      • FA03
      • Mon 01/14, 6:50PM - 7:00PM
      • by Kristen Thompson
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics and astronomy education research has shown that students exhibit larger conceptual gains when they are actively engaged rather than passive learners. As a result, interactive pedagogical tools have revolutionized the way that physics and astronomy are both taught and learned. One such tool that is becoming more prominent in classrooms is the iPad. If used thoughtfully, iPads can facilitate student learning by affording students the opportunity to explore astronomy in new and interactive ways. In this talk, I will present how this technology can be used in combination with lecture tutorials to encourage students to deeply connect with course material and gain a lasting understanding of astronomy concepts.
      • New York Times CENTRIPETAL FORCE Articles that Help Teach Physics

      • FA05
      • Mon 01/14, 7:10PM - 7:20PM
      • by John Cise
      • Type: Contributed
      • The New York Times has had over the past few years many news articles that use the Centripetal Force Concept. Some examples are: Black holes and neutron stars spiraling into collision producing gravitational waves, trains speeding off tracks on turns, tilting single passenger cars, dancers dancing in circles, spinning X game athletes, orbiting satellites, orbiting asteroids and comets, orbiting exoplanets,etc. The website these applications are located at is: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYTCisePhysics.pdf
      • Integrating Video Creation Activity in a General Physics Class

      • FA06
      • Mon 01/14, 7:20PM - 7:30PM
      • by Amtul Chaudry
      • Type: Contributed
      • Videos have been used in a physics classroom to facilitate learning of concepts. This idea has been employed in a slightly different format in an algebra-based lower division physics classroom, where students create their own videos. Students have the option of choosing any concept from the topics taught during the semester. This exercise is integrated in the syllabus and graded. The development of this idea over the past few years and student feedback about the activity is presented here.
      • Kinesthetic Learning Using a Local Positioning System

      • FA07
      • Mon 01/14, 7:30PM - 7:40PM
      • by Cora Siebert Paul DeStefano, Thomas Allen, Ralf Widenhorn

      • Type: Contributed
      • Fundamental concepts taught at the introductory undergraduate level include position, velocity, and acceleration, as well as the physical relationships between these concepts. Addressing these key physics principles with a kinesthetic approach has been shown to have powerful effects in various ways, from positive learning outcomes to the development of inclusive and engaging classroom environments. With this as our goal, we have developed kinesthetic laboratory exercises using a local positioning system, allowing students to act out various position, velocity, and acceleration vs. time graphs using their bodies and remote controlled cars. The presented activities promote the growth of scientific reasoning through the practice of making predictions and observations, as well as establishing qualitative models that apply to their everyday experience.
      • The Teacher’s AR-Assistant in the Physics Classroom

      • FA08
      • Mon 01/14, 7:40PM - 7:50PM
      • by Oleg Yavoruk
      • Type: Contributed
      • There are many technical solutions for applying of the augmented reality (AR) technologies to the daily educational process. Through the AR-device (with an inserted smartphone) the teacher obtains the completely new spectrum of teaching instruments: the Lecturer’s AR-Assistant, the Teacher’s AR-Assistant in Practical Classes, and the AR-Labs Assistant. The mobile AR-application allows to see the current time, the time after the start (and until the end) of the lecture, subtitles or the lesson plan, procedural recommendations, text-notifications; it permits to operate the timetable, the list of students, the list of problems with solutions, the list of animated models, and any texts, pictures, videos, etc., with the possibility of private viewing or demonstrating on a public screen. In addition, the radically new technologies of teaching, the unusual appearance of the teacher attract the students’ attention.
      • Analysis of Meta-Modeling Knowledge and Modeling Ability Change through Model-based Inquiry of High School Students

      • FA09
      • Mon 01/14, 7:50PM - 8:00PM
      • by Cha Jiseon Yoon Sung Hyun

      • Type: Contributed
      • The purpose of this study is to analyze the changes of meta-modeling knowledge and modeling ability of high school students through model-based inquiry activities and to grasp the relation and singularity between meta-modeling knowledge and modeling ability. The model-based inquiry was conducted for a total of 17 hours, beginning with a lesson on the development of the model's scientific history. We analyzed the changes of meta-modeling knowledge of four students who completed the whole process and analyzed the change of modeling ability through model output and students' language.
      • 3D Printing Fabrication in the Teaching and Research Laboratory

      • FA10
      • Mon 01/14, 8:00PM - 8:10PM
      • by Joshua Yount Daniel Letner, Perry Tompkins

      • Type: Contributed
      • 3D Printing (aka additive manufacturing,) is a technology that has vast implications to modern society. Some of the most important and useful applications of 3D Printing technology in physics education are as a tool in the teaching and research laboratory. In this presentation we examine some of the potential benefits of 3D printing technology as a focus of instruction, a supplement to instruction, and a supplement to research. Computer proficiency is strengthened via Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools (for designing objects to be printed) and through programming the microcontrollers used to control the printer itself. Electronics and mechanical knowledge can be enhanced through the building improving and maintenance of DIY printers. Unique objects that can be used in the classroom and laboratory can be printed. Some designs are for a specific use and others are more broadly applicable. Most designs presented are available on Thingiverse.com through the account “SBUPhysics.”
      • Acoustic Characteristics on Material and Shape of Tubes

      • FA11
      • Mon 01/14, 8:10PM - 8:20PM
      • by Jo Mi-Sun Kim Jung Bog

      • Type: Contributed
      • The tube is a basic experimental tool for teaching the generation of the standing wave and the resonance phenomenon. In this study, we investigated the acoustic characteristics of cylindrical tubes(straight tubes), conical tubes, and bell-shape tube madeof silicon tubes and 3D printers. In order to analyze the acoustic characteristics, we used an oscilloscope and an excel program for Fourier transformation, and investigated the acoustic characteristics of transmission vs frequency graphs and Fourier transforms. Larger diameter tube shows smaller Q-factor. Bell-shape tube shows transmission in broader frequency range. By understanding the acoustic characteristics of a pipe with a simple structure, it will be possible to expect the acoustic characteristics of many surrounding wind instruments.
      • We have 3D Printer, Now What?

      • FA12
      • Mon 01/14, 8:20PM - 8:30PM
      • by Dwain Desbien
      • Type: Contributed
      • The physics program at EMCC has had a 3D printer for a 3 years now. Early last year a few former students (still at EMCC) approached me and asked if they could help me and use the engineering design skills they had been learning. So we embarked on working together to create lab equipment to enhance existing labs, repair broken equipment (even though Vernier would have they students wanted to try). This talk will share what they have made and provide access to the .stl files.
  • Exhibit Hall Open (Saturday)

      • Exhibit Hall Open (Saturday)

      • EXH01
      • Sat 01/12, 8:00PM - 10:00PM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
  • Exhibit Hall Open (Sunday)

      • Exhibit Hall Open (Sunday)

      • EXH02
      • Sun 01/13, 10:00AM - 5:00PM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
  • Friday Registration

      • Friday Registration

      • REG01
      • Fri 01/11, 4:00PM - 7:00PM
      • Leti Marquez
      • Type: Registration
  • Frontiers Session: Living and Working in the Space Beyond Earth

      • Countermeasures: Defending the Human Body Against the Hazards of Spaceflight

      • BB01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Andrea Hanson
      • Type: Invited
      • Dr. Hanson will discuss how living and working in the extreme environment of microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) challenges the human body in extraordinary ways, and the great measures NASA astronauts must take to protect their physiology to complete physically demanding tasks in space and return safely back to Earth. Results from recent research focused on increased effectiveness and efficiency to optimize exercise countermeasures to will be shared. She will discuss lessons learned from the use of wearable technologies, virtual reality, and robots to help keep astronauts fit while working in space. Dr. Hanson will also provide an overview of the challenges associated with maintaining exercise systems in the smaller space vehicles NASA will use to travel to the moon and Mars.
      • What do Physics Teachers and Astronauts Have in Common?

      • BB02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Dorit Donoviel
      • Type: Invited
      • Though the vast unknown of outer space consists of all the characteristics of fantasy, many similarities exist between life on earth and life in space. As humans, we still need to eat, sleep, and exercise in space much the same way we do on earth to maintain physical and mental health. The challenge of living and working in space is two-fold because we don’t know what we don’t know. And what we do know – the instruments, medicines, and tools that have been proven to maintain human health on earth, we must adapt for use in space. Based at Baylor College of Medicine and partnered with NASA, the Translational Research Institute for Space Health funds groundbreaking research from all over the country. With the help of our consortium partners, the California Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, we are transforming health for humans on and off the planet.
      • How Will the Spaceflight Environment Affect Physiology of Space Explorers?

      • BB03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 3:00PM
      • by Virginia Wotring
      • Type: Invited
      • Even after >50 years, we are still learning how the spaceflight environment affects physiology. In the 1970s it became apparent that bones demineralized and muscles atrophied, presumably due to reduction of gravity-associated skeletal loading. Since then, many other physiological systems have been studied on missions, and in virtually every case, in-flight changes were measured. However, it’s not clear if reduced gravity is the cause – the spaceflight environment also includes space radiation, elevated stress, and a closed environment. Research now attempts to determine if spaceflight-associated physiological changes might be problematic and require countermeasures to maintain crew health. As mission durations increase, we’ve also begun study the adaptation of physiology over time in the spaceflight environment. Some physiological changes (altered vision) were identified only after missions reached >4 months. Of current interest are needs for human exploration of deep space, so crewmembers remain healthy and productive in spaceflight for 3 years.
      • From Classrooms to Capsules: Physics for the Final Frontier

      • BB04
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:10PM
      • by Geoffrey Steeves
      • Type: Contributed
      • Space explorers require a solid foundation in physics to survive and thrive in the challenging physical environment beyond Earth. Not every astronaut is a physicist, so it is crucial to create curriculum to engage students from a myriad of backgrounds. Drawing on my experiences working with astronauts, teaching in the cross-disciplinary environment of the International Space University and working as a flight instructor, I will discuss what an ‘Essential Physics for Astronauts’ course will look like. For students of this course, a knowledge of physics alone is not sufficient. Astronauts must also be able to apply what they’ve learned in a time-critical, resource limited environment, therefore I will also discuss how a course like this should be taught and evaluated, to best prepare future space explorers for success.
      • An Out-of-This-World Approach to Centripetal Acceleration

      • BB05
      • Sun 01/13, 3:10PM - 3:20PM
      • by Grant Thompson
      • Type: Contributed
      • The merry-go-round is often the go-to example of centripetal acceleration in many physics classrooms. However, in an increasingly technological world, this classic amusement ride is becoming less familiar with students. We have recently moved to introducing this concept using a new example – that of ‘artificial gravity.’ Not only is this example exciting to students, but it also brings with it connections to current research problems and interdisciplinary interests. In this talk, I will present how the results of an experiment to determine the effect of simulated gravitational fields on plant growth have been used to teach students the concept of centripetal acceleration in the physics classroom.
  • Gender Considerations in the Laboratory

      • The Laboratory as a Historically Gendered Space

      • FB01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Joanna Behrman
      • Type: Invited
      • From their beginning in the late nineteenth century, secondary school and college-level educational laboratories have been highly gendered spaces. Both consciously and unconsciously crafted, laboratories have worked as part of a larger process of shapingthe identities of the students. The laboratory has also functioned as a gatekeeping mechanism for scientific occupations. In this presentation I will outline how the gendering of educational laboratories in the physical sciences has changed over time, covering trends from the 19th through the mid-20th century. I will argue that certain metaphors, such as the laboratory as a frontier, have been particularly exclusionary. While the laboratory as “frontier” is one example of a masculinized space, I will also discuss instances in which the laboratory was gendered and criticized as a feminine space - as in “cookbook” laboratories.
      • Doing Gender and Doing Physics in the Lab

      • FB02
      • Mon 01/14, 7:00PM - 7:30PM
      • by Chris Gosling Allison Gonsalves

      • Type: Invited
      • This presentation examines students’ interactions with laboratory materials (equipment/instruments) in graduate programs and considers implications for physics teaching at secondary levels. Taking a close look at doctoral students ‘doing physics’ in an experimental setting, we explore how students’ interactions with laboratory materials produce new understandings of how students ‘do gender’ in the lab. We then consider the consequences these interactions may have for students’ positionality (e.g. who and what matters in lab practices) and identity work in the laboratory. We will conclude this presentation with a reflective discussion of how engagement with laboratory materials in the secondary physics classroom may (re)produce gendered pedagogic practices.
      • Agency and the Equity of Lab Groups

      • FB03
      • Mon 01/14, 7:30PM - 8:00PM
      • by Natasha Holmes Katherine Quinn, Emily Smith, Zachary Whipps

      • Type: Invited
      • Building from previous talks in this session, this presentation will focus on the ways in which different lab environments encourage ‘doing gender’. In college physics labs, we have identified gender differences in the ways groups coordinate the equipment, computers, and notebooks along with their ideas. We have also found that as labs become less structured and students are making more of the experimental decisions (higher agency), the need for coordinated decision making adds a layer of complexity to the group dynamics and the equity of those groups. This builds on the previous talk’s discussion of students’ positionality and identity in the laboratory. We will also discuss how these roles are being allocated in these high-agency activities and present questions as to the associated issues and solutions.
      • Gender and Physics Anxiety in Studio Physics Labs

      • FB04
      • Mon 01/14, 8:00PM - 8:30PM
      • by Elise Agra Susan Fischer

      • Type: Invited
      • In this presentation we explore gender in a college studio classroom, where students are asked to actively engage with small groups of their peers in many different types of hands-on activities, in an environment that is much more lab-like than that of atraditional classroom. Research has shown that men outperform women on concept inventories. A factor that may be relevant to students’ physics performance is physics anxiety, which can be described as the feeling of fear and apprehension about physics-related activities. We used the Physics Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS), which has 32 items in four categories: general course/test anxiety, anxiety about the lack of physics knowledge, math anxiety, and physics laboratory anxiety. We modified the scale, which was created for traditional physics classrooms, to fit the studio environment. We investigate the relationship between students’ gender, physics anxiety, and physics performance in a studio-style introductory physics course.
  • Goals and Assessment for Computational Work in Physics Classes

      • Making Computation Normal: the Computational Initiative at IUPUI

      • DI01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:30AM
      • by Andrew Gavrin
      • Type: Invited
      • The Department of Physics at IUPUI has begun a multi-year effort to make computational methods a centerpiece of our undergraduate degree programs. Our plans currently include creating a sequence of computational physics courses, incorporating computational methods in all majors’ courses, and creating a computational physics degree track in cooperation with our colleagues in the Department of Computer Science. The plans are well under way, with a first course in computational methods currently offered, computational methods incorporated to some degree in all courses, and the computational track approved at the college level. This talk will stress the change process in the department, major decisions taken, internal and external resources that have supported our efforts, assessment plans, and preliminary results.
      • Computational Modeling in Intro Physics: Assessing Student Learning

      • DI02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 11:40AM
      • by Ruth Chabay Bruce Sherwood, Aaron Titus

      • Type: Contributed
      • In order to improve our instruction in computational modeling in physics, we need to assess what students have learned and identify areas where our instruction could be improved. In a calculus-based introductory physics course that integrates computational modeling, portions of our lab practical exams at the end of both first and second semester focused on computational modeling. We discuss our goals for student learning and the tasks we used to assess them, and compare the performance of students with no previous computing experience with that of experienced computer science majors.
      • Typed Functional Programming and Physics

      • DI03
      • Mon 01/14, 11:40AM - 11:50AM
      • by Scott Walck
      • Type: Contributed
      • I describe the goals and assessment techniques for a sophomore-level computational physics course using the Haskell programming language. The principal goal of the course is to deepen a student's understanding of the structure of basic physical theories(mostly Newton's second law, waves, and electromagnetic theory) by expressing them in a new language. The language has types (so that scalars, vectors, and vector fields, for example, each have a distinct type) that help to organize and clarify our thinking. The language also has higher-order functions (functions that take other functions as input), which eases the syntax needed to express ideas like numerical integration and the Euler method. A book in progress that develops Haskell from scratch and uses it to express basic physical theories is available at the author's web site (see footnote).
      • Computational Modeling in Physics First

      • DI04
      • Mon 01/14, 11:50AM - 12:00PM
      • by Rebecca Vieyra Colleen Megowan Romanowicz, Kathi Fisler, Ben Lerner, Joe Gibbs Politz

      • Type: Contributed
      • Good physics teaching and learning is dependent upon the use and coordination of representations: graphs, algebra, diagrams, etc. Our computational modeling project aims to research the use of computational modeling as an additional representational tool. In our project, teachers learned evidence-based Modeling Instruction pedagogy for teaching physics with representations while also learning to write programs with Bootstrap:Algebra (see bootstrapworld.org). Preliminary findings suggest that students of teachers in this program are learning to think through physical problems differently when using computational models, and we have noted that the biggest challenge to integrating computing with science are not students’ ability or interest, but teachers’ confidence.
  • Graduate Student Topical Session

      • Graduate Student Topical Session

      • TOP01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Daryl McPadden
      • Type: Topical
  • Hands-on Outreach

      • Hands-on Outreach

      • FC
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Paul Williams
      • Type: Panel
      • "Hands-on On the Road" is a style of outreach where the public engages in direct scientific investigation and inquiry. This style of outreach can have many forms ranging from engineering exercises such as bridge building and egg drops to traveling hands-on science museums. In this panel discussion, practitioners of Hands-on On the Road will share their experience about such programs including topics such as how to get started, the type of activities that they include, how they run and maintain their program, as well as others. Sample activities from the Austin Community College Hands-on Science program will be available for exploration.
  • High School

      • Solar Car Challenge to Experience Physics on Track

      • FH01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 6:40PM
      • by Ahmet Afsin
      • Type: Contributed
      • This is a nationwide challenge where high school students build man size solar vehicles. To get in and ride, one year at Dallas Motor Speedway, one year cross country, from Dallas to California. This is a real challenge for team members where they learn team work, apply electric circuits, apply dynamics, torque, energy...etc. The car really stays in between physics and real world engineering. It requires 3D design and calculation approaches and skills, of course welding, precise measurement..to build a car and make it work. Even the project's name and advertisement fire student curiosity. And when they finish, they are full with vast knowledge and self confidence of achieving to create a working dynamic system.
      • OnRamps Physics: Experiencing UT-Austin at Texas High Schools

      • FH02
      • Mon 01/14, 6:40PM - 6:50PM
      • by Jason Dowd Jonathan Perry, Elyse Zimmer, Jennifer Porter

      • Type: Contributed
      • OnRamps is an innovative dual-enrollment and professional development program in which UT-Austin faculty, learning specialists, and experts in college success partner with Texas high school (HS) districts for students to authentically experience university courses. An overarching goal of the OnRamps program is to increase the number and diversity of students who are prepared to excel at the university level. OnRamps currently offers two 3-credit-hour introductory physics courses through distance education that are delivered with their respective HS equivalents. Student learning is driven by Peer Instruction and Modeling Instruction pedagogies, with college assignments administered and submitted online. Course content, developed by UT-Austin Physics faculty members, aligns to the residential university course and the expectations of leading universities. We will discuss the logistics and challenges of delivering a distance learning UT course alongside a corresponding HS course. For the 2018-2019 academic year, OnRamps has partnered with approximately 150 HS physics instructors enrolling nearly 6000 physics students across Texas.
      • From Constant Velocity to Astrophysics: Computation in the HS Classroom

      • FH03
      • Mon 01/14, 6:50PM - 7:00PM
      • by Charlie Payne
      • Type: Contributed
      • The learning of physics concepts can be augmented by computational models. Using GlowScript, fundamentals of programming in Python can be learned while creating models that produce three dimensional representations and simulations that also include graphs and data tables. While physical labs should be a primary method for hands-on learning, programming can produce results not achievable in a lab. Examples of a sequence of learning, from constant velocity through force interactions, will be demonstrated. The use of programming in AP Physics courses will also be shown, as well as more advanced topics such as binary black hole inspirals that produce gravitational waves and planetary interactions such as in our Solar System. Some examples of student programs from NCSSM will also be shown and discussed. The use of iPython notebooks and data analysis involving both LIGO and CERN data will be also be shown.
      • A Free Yet Effective Way of Implementing Peer Instruction in a Physics Class

      • FH04
      • Mon 01/14, 7:00PM - 7:10PM
      • by Mehmet Ozgun
      • Type: Contributed
      • Peer instruction is an interactive teaching technique works well to address students’ struggle to apply factual knowledge to conceptual problems. In my Physics classes I started using this technique with some paid web-based platforms where each student needs to access a computer, tablet or a phone. But this is an expensive and time-consuming way so I started using Plickers! This assessment tool allows you to collect on-the-spot formative assessment data without the need to have students use devices or paper and pencil. The only things a teacher needs are a computer, a cell phone and printed Plickers cards which can be used over and over again in different classes. I would like to share how am I implementing the use of technology via the Plickers method to my peer instruction sessions in my Physics classes.
      • A New Mindset: Physics and 21st Century Skills

      • FH05
      • Mon 01/14, 7:10PM - 7:20PM
      • by Erol Dede
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics and Engineering Projects provides practical methods and fruitful alternatives to gain the 21st century skills. The inclusion of Physics and Engineering projects helps students develop skills such as analytic reasoning, complex problem solving, and teamwork. Besides, it also provides educators with the easily applicable methods to fulfill the requirements of special programs such as Career and Technical Education (CTE). We believe that our practice to reach the objectives guided by the 21st century skills and CTE curriculum by using some specifically chosen Physics and Engineering projects is quite inspirational and will introduce you a new mindset for a new approach.
      • From Friendship to Tech-Savviness: Benefits of a Club

      • FH06
      • Mon 01/14, 7:20PM - 7:30PM
      • by Mehmet Ozgun
      • Type: Contributed
      • Studies relating to the impact of extracurricular activities on students show that educational grades, study habits, and school-based behavior improve once youngsters attend regular after-school clubs. One such club is our Rocketry Club! This club nurtured social skills and confidence of my students and taught them the value of working as a team to achieve a mutual goal. We’ve been meeting twice after school, launching rockets every other Saturday, having breakfast before and lunch after our launches. Students mastered in aerospace engineering by using the modern technology such as laser cutters and 3D printers to create their fins and the shipment box to ship their rocket to Washington, D.C., after being invited to the finals of the world’s largest rocketry competition “Team America Rocketry Challenge, TARC”. I will have two of my team captains share their experience and motivate and encourage the audience to establish similar clubs in their schools.
      • Nigerian High School Physics Students Understanding of Science as Inquiry: A Resources-based Exploration

      • FH07
      • Mon 01/14, 7:30PM - 7:40PM
      • by Mark Akubo Cyril Akubo

      • Type: Contributed
      • Focus on student conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills is well documented in the physic education research literature (Docktor & Mestre, 2014). Current framing of proficiency in science calls for students’ ability to be generative in theirthinking as they construct knowledge to learn physics (NRC, 2012). Research suggests that students high school physics background impacts their learning in introductory physics classrooms or courses (Barrera-Garrido, 2012). This background also involves students’ understandings about scientific inquiry” (Lederman et al. 2014). In this qualitative study, I employed resources-based perspective (Hammer et al. 2004) to explore Nigerian students’ (12th graders) understanding of scientific inquiry. The participants are high school physics students drawn from schools across four geopolitical zones of the country. I highlight the productive nuggets in their responses to the Views About Scientific Inquiry questionnaire (VASI, Lederman et al., 2014) as resourceful for their understanding of science as inquiry.
      • How to Create STEM Culture in School Using Project Based Teaching Strategies?

      • FH08
      • Mon 01/14, 7:40PM - 7:50PM
      • by Abdulkadir Akti
      • Type: Contributed
      • STEM fields have been seen as hard by most of students, so much so, that drawing their attention to STEM always becomes an issue for educators. In our STEM SOS (Students on the Stage) Model, we use PBL, as an after school club, to create a STEM culture. Students conduct research and create video presentations. As part of their after school club activities, students organize events, as well as, invite guest speakers, that are experts in their field, to present events at our school. This type of PBL strategy helps educators to promote STEM in our school system.
      • Physics Olympiads

      • FH09
      • Mon 01/14, 7:50PM - 8:00PM
      • by Nebi Sahin
      • Type: Contributed
      • Drawing boundaries where physics is valid is very difficult because innovations, technology, and engineering advancements and inventions are continually expanding these boundaries. In most new theories and engineering designs, basic philosophical and physical ideas are based on models, equations and physics laws. The purpose of my presentation is to emphasize the necessity and the applicability of Physics Olympiads training in the U.S. To be successful in the field of Science Olympiads, going beyond the training methods we know may be a must. These studies should be offered to individual talented and relevant students with an earlier provision of high school algebra and calculus support. I have had very successful results in different countries where I have worked as a Physics Olympiad instructor for many years. My students received acceptance from the best universities and earned their professors' respect in a short period and contributed to the world of science.
      • STEAM-ER

      • FH10
      • Mon 01/14, 8:00PM - 8:10PM
      • by Bilal Sengez Atilla Kaya

      • Type: Contributed
      • STEAM - ER: Science Technology Engineering Art Math - Escape Room. Did you hear about escape rooms, where you are locked in a room and have an hour to escape from the room that is full of riddles. Think about all of the riddles are STEAM related. Furthermore, your students are setting up the rooms. I will also show couple of examples of how it looks like. We will also discuss benefits of this project.
      • Houston, We Have AP Physics 1 Problem

      • FH11
      • Mon 01/14, 8:10PM - 8:20PM
      • by Oguz Celik
      • Type: Contributed
      • I am teaching AP Physics 1 since it started. According to CollegeBoard data, AP Physics 1 has the lowest average score and the lowest proportion of students that score a 5 out of all current AP subjects. In this presentation, I will try to introduce why AP Physics 1 has the lowest average score. Does the new AP Physics curriculum affect the average scores? What are the students and teacher challenge of the course? Also, I will compare Texas and nation average score of AP Physics 1.
      • Physics in the 21st Century – A Tool for Teaching Physics

      • FH12
      • Mon 01/14, 8:20PM - 8:30PM
      • by Michael Jensen
      • Type: Contributed
      • In 2005 the high school system was reformed in Denmark. The curriculum for the physics course at the senior (12th grade) level was supplemented by a new component, titled Physics in the 21st century. The purpose of this was two-fold: Provide students with a window to modern physics, while simultaneously providing a lever for post-graduate teacher training. Resources for in service teacher development are both limited, and divided between pedagogical and physics topics. The Danish Association of Physics Teachers has been instrumental in implementing the second objective. With experience, a parallel track model emerged. A group of teachers gathered to work in two tracks: developing a 2-day teacher course in conjunction with a University, and writing a textbook tailored to the extra curriculum. Experiences with the model have been good. Participating in the development of such courses has proven a valuable experience for the teachers involved.
  • Implementing Research-based Instructional Strategies

      • Comparison between Discussion and Controversy Model (DCM) and Traditional Education

      • by Dina Izadi
      • Type: Contributed
      • Instead of memorizing formula without conceptual understanding in basic sciences, Discussion and Controversy Model (DCM) helps every student to be actively engaged in classroom. Teachers by innovation in teaching , creating a friendly environment for discussion and involving students to find a new method in solving problems, make students think more and try to invent something new and extend their abilities. It can motivate students to get depth knowledge through solving problems related to real life by experiment, collaboration, discussion and constructive challenge and go through the reasoning by themselves. To follow the model its components are described more clearly to find out the effective parameters by comparison two groups, one as a teacher – centered educational system and the other as student-centered learning. DCM is student-centered learning environment, which causes students take responsibility for their own learning.
      • Flipping Introductory Physics: Impact of Feedback Quizzes and Student-generated Videos

      • by Roberto Ramos
      • Type: Contributed
      • I present the results of flipping multiple Introductory physics classes in a university setting, focusing on the impact of employing of post-video, feedback quizzes and student projects consisting of student-generated teaching videos. The classes included algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics. Outside class, students viewed over 100 online video lectures on introductory physics prepared by the instructor. Inside the class, students solved and discussed problems and conceptual issues in greater detail and utilized tutorial worksheets. A pre-class online quiz was deployed as an important source of feedback and validating student understanding. As part of their grades, students were required to produce teaching videos graded on the basis of correctness, creativity, and delivery. I will report on the student reactions to the feedback mechanism, student responses using data based on anonymous surveys, as well as on learning gains from pre-/post- physics diagnostic tests.
      • JiTT and Peer Instruction Using Clickers in a QM Course

      • HB01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 1:00PM
      • by Ryan Sayer Emily Marshman, Chandralekha Singh

      • Type: Invited
      • Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an instructional strategy involving feedback from students on prelecture activities in order to design in-class activities to build on the continuing feedback from students. We investigate the effectiveness of a JiTT approach, which included in-class concept tests using clickers in an upper-division quantum mechanics course. We analyze student performance on prelecture reading quizzes, in-class clicker questions answered individually, and clicker questions answered after group discussion, and compare those performances with open-ended retention quizzes administered after all instructional activities on the same concepts. In general, compared to the reading quizzes, student performance improved when individual clicker questions were posed after lectures that focused on student difficulties found via electronic feedback. The performance on the clicker questions after group discussion following individual clicker question responses also showed improvement. We discuss some possible reasons for the improved performance at various stages, e.g., from pre-lecture reading quizzes to post-lecture clicker questions, and from individual to group clicker questions.
      • A Comparison of the Use of Demonstrations in Introductory Physics

      • HB02
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:10PM
      • by Kathy Shan
      • Type: Contributed
      • I discuss a comparison of the use of demonstrations in multiple sections of introductory, calculus based physics (Physics 1 and Physics 2) for science and engineering majors at an open enrollment, public university. Due to local circumstances, some sections of Physics 1 and Physics 2 took place in classrooms that made using demonstrations all but impossible. This study presents a comparison of student performance in classes where demonstrations were used and in classes where they were not. All sections were taught by the same instructor, using interactive methods in lecture and recitation, including Peer Instruction and physics tutorials. FCI Pre- and Post-test scores were used along with student grades on midterm and final exams for comparison in Physics 1. Student grades on midterm and final exams were used for comparison in Physics 2.
      • “Semi-Flipping” Introductory Electricity/Magnetism: Improving Effectiveness of Instructor Face Time

      • HB03
      • Tue 01/15, 1:10PM - 1:20PM
      • by Jennifer Gimmell Tom Carter

      • Type: Contributed
      • We present our ambitious adaptation of the fully flipped classroom: the “semi-flipped” environment. Our “semi-flipped” environment allocates half of the available instructor face time to a personalized, community-building interactive problem-solving session. These sessions consist of instructor-chosen exercises to bridge the gap between lecture examples and assessments, target specific conceptual misunderstandings, and to promote discussion among the students. Our approach builds a sense of community between students and their instructor, evokes a personalized level of differentiated instruction, and provides a versatile platform to address a variety of student needs, serving those who prefer to work individually with minimal intervention to those who need extensive outside assistance. Data from our ongoing multi-semester study has shown an increase in out-of-class student engagement in addition to positive feedback from a diverse population of sophomore-level community college engineering students.
      • Understanding Student Motivation and Attitudes to Enhance Learning

      • HB04
      • Tue 01/15, 1:20PM - 1:30PM
      • by Kate Dellenbusch Matthew Partin

      • Type: Contributed
      • Motivation and attitudes about a particular subject or learning in general can influence student conceptual gains and course performance. We have been examining relationships between student motivation, attitudes, and course performance in the context of the growth versus fixed mindset model for learners. We administered selected scales from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) and the Growth Mindset Assessment (GMA) instruments to hundreds of Bowling Green State University students in various physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, and communications courses to explore these connections. Using these data, we have begun developing a path model relating factors such as growth mindset, control of learning beliefs, intrinsic goal orientation, and self-efficacy. Can we leverage these connections to enhance student learning?
      • The NEIU PEERS Project: Embedding Research in the University Physics Sequence

      • HB05
      • Tue 01/15, 1:30PM - 1:40PM
      • by Paulo Acioli Rachel Trana, Elisabet Head, Joseph Hibdon Jr., Ken Nicholson

      • Type: Contributed
      • We present results of the implementation of mini-research components in the Undergraduate University Physics curriculum at Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU). These are results of a funded NSF-IUSE grant to engage students, enhance learning, and improve retention in STEM. The primary emphasis in the modified Physics courses was in the research process. We dedicated three of the traditional laboratory sessions to developing a research project that mimics the experience in a traditional research setting. We evolve from deciding on a research topic to planning to execution of the project. Students develop not only their research skills but also their written and verbal communication. The challenges and successes of the implementation and assessment of learning gains for each course will be presented.
      • A Curriculum to Implement NGSS for Engagement, Equity, and Agency

      • HB06
      • Tue 01/15, 1:40PM - 1:50PM
      • by Shannon Wachowski Alisa Grimes

      • Type: Contributed
      • This talk introduces high school physics teachers and teacher educators to a new physics curriculum, PEER, for implementing NGSS practices in the classroom. In addition to understanding physics and scientific practices, teachers of NGSS must also recognize their roles as curating transformative educational experiences among students. As students make claims from evidence and establish principles from consensus (often for the first time), they undergo a kind of transformation in their understanding of the role of science education in their lives. In this talk, teachers learn to manage the multiple demands of supporting students through this transformation while providing meaningful laboratory experiences and consensus building opportunities. Participants will discuss their roles as teachers in helping students integrate physics content and scientific practices as they develop models, explanations, and principles that explain the physical world. Presenters will share data regarding how this curriculum has increased engagement, equity, and agency in their classrooms.
      • Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Physics Teacher Preparation

      • HB07
      • Tue 01/15, 1:50PM - 2:00PM
      • by Mariam Manuel Paige Evans, Donna Stokes, Leah Shields

      • Type: Contributed
      • The teachHOUSTON and Physics faculty at the University of Houston developed and implemented two physics courses, Physics By Inquiry (Physics 4342) and Physics for Preservice Middle School Teachers (Physics 4345), to engage secondary pre-service teachers in interactive, researched-based, teaching strategies. The instructional team has recently infused culturally responsive pedagogical (CRP) practices into the coursework, thus, preparing future STEM teachers to provide dynamic physics instruction that both student-centered, and, culturally-centered. CRP is a major concept in urban and multicultural education that stresses the ability of teachers to respond to their students by incorporating elements of students’ culture in their teaching. This session will explore the implementation and use of culturally responsive pedagogy in physics instruction. Presenters will highlight activities utilized in courses including the employment of the Culturally Responsive Mathematics/Science Teaching Lesson Analysis Tool. This self-reflective tool promotes discussion and critical reflection through combining content, students’ thinking, and an equity focus.
      • Supplemental Activities to Transform Traditional Exams Into Powerful Learning Experiences

      • HB08
      • Tue 01/15, 2:00PM - 2:10PM
      • by Jordan Gerton Brianna Montoya

      • Type: Contributed
      • Traditional introductory physics exams are designed to probe efficacy across a range of topics, but may also challenge students in unintended ways. For example, the time-bound nature of most exams may disadvantage language learners, students who process information more deliberately, and those with test anxiety. Non-traditional assessment approaches, such as group exams/quizzes, engage students in learning as part of the assessment process and may address some of these issues, but may also be difficult to implement in some contexts. We present some supplemental activities that are meant to transform traditional exams into powerful learning experiences for all students. Some examples include publishing the authentic exam scenarios well in advance of the test date, having students produce exam solutions in small groups immediately after an exam, and having students participate in a gallery stroll of the group-produced solutions. We seek feedback on how to study the efficacy of this approach.
      • Summary Lecture as Delay Organizer of Knowledge - A Discipline Culture Approcach

      • HB09
      • Tue 01/15, 2:10PM - 2:20PM
      • by Ehud Goren Igal Galili

      • Type: Contributed
      • The study proposes a new educational tool - a delay organizer to support meaningful learning of physics. In particular, we emphasized a theory-based knowledge of physics and a hierarchical structure of physical theory. The instruction was embedded into asummary lecture which reviewed the major content of mechanics exemplifying nucleus, body and periphery of the theory of classical mechanics. The goal was to promote students' cultural content knowledge in this domain of school physics. The study included construction of a summary lecture and the assessment of its experimental application in high school (11th 12th grades) and educational college (preservice science teachers of science). Some results of qualitative and quantitative assessment are presented. They indicated the efficacy of such intrusion and its positive impact on students' holistic knowledge and conceptual understanding. Besides,the instruction caused increasing of student interest to the subject matter presented in conceptual variation expanding the traditional disciplinary curriculum.
      • Scaffolding Predictions Students Make, and Reflect On Given Experimental Data

      • HB10
      • Tue 01/15, 2:20PM - 2:30PM
      • by Adebanjo Oriade
      • Type: Contributed
      • Making predictions, documenting them, reflecting on them in the light of interaction with peers, and considerations of fresh experimental data is a complex learning process that requires scaffolding. This realization comes from reflecting on implementation of components of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILD) [Sokoloff and Thornton(1997)] in a physics course for non-science majors. We discuss two dimensions of scaffolds for the initial prediction students make. In one dimension the required prediction ranges from purely qualitative in nature to the quantitative predictions. Quantitative predictions we think are more challenging for our students than qualitative predictions. The other dimension depends on the nature of change in the value of the dependent physical quantity involved. This aspect considers a spectrum from static predictions to dynamic predictions. The authors of Prospect theory [Kahneman and Tversky(1979)] , describe how perceptual representations highlight changes and differences, while being largely insensitive to the level of a state maintained over a period of time. We engage questions about intuitive thinking and observed systematic biases.
  • Innovations in Teaching Analytical Mechanics

      • Classical Mechanics with Lab Projects

      • CA01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 6:00PM
      • by Anne Cox
      • Type: Invited
      • Junior level Classical Mechanics is traditionally taught as a theory course with the occasional sprinkling of computational exercises. However, the material lends itself to low-cost experiments that students can implement relatively easily. Unfortunately, many Classical Mechanics courses do not have an associated lab, so students miss out on the satisfying connection between theory, computation and experiment. We have found that students will elect to complete laboratory projects for the class given the appropriate incentive. We will discuss the incentives used, the associated assignments, the faculty-side logistics, as well as a sampling of the types of projects students have completed and what it has added to the course as a whole.
      • Using EJS to Add Computational Modeling to a Junior-Level Mechanics Course

      • CA02
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:30PM
      • by Mario Belloni Anthony Kuchera

      • Type: Invited
      • At Davidson College, physics majors take a one-semester mechanics course typically as juniors. This course covers the typical topics of Newtonian and Lagrangian mechanics, non-linear dynamics, followed by assorted topics of the instructor’s choosing. Toaddress the amount of topics that result in solutions that are not analytically solvable, we have added low-level computation into the course via Easy Java Simulations, EJS. EJS is a Java application that creates Java and JavaScript simulations of physical phenomena. We have used EJS to create Java programs in the past but this fall transitioned to having students create JavaScript simulations. Our goal in having students create these simulations is to help students understand the physics, not necessarily to become proficient in JavaScript. In this talk, we will outline the specifics of our course, demonstrate EJS, and show several examples of how we get students to better understand the underlying physics through low-level computational modeling.
  • Integrating Computation Into Laboratories at All Levels

      • Computation, Experimentation, and Analytical Theory: The 3-Legged Stool

      • HC01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 1:00PM
      • by Kelly Roos
      • Type: Invited
      • Computation, Experimentation, and Analytical Theory are NOT mutually exclusive tools for educating students in the STEM disciplines. The union of these three tools invokes the picture of three-legged stool that is stable because each leg plays a crucial, irreplaceable part in the stools’ stability. In introductory labs, the idea of integrating computation invokes typical data analysis; but, the introductory labs also provide opportunities for taking students deeper into computation, including the building of basic computational models to verify (and refine) model predictions with the real data. In advanced labs, providing computational activities beyond the canonical advanced data analysis and reduction, can achieve educational enlightenment that the combination of experiment and analytical theory, alone, cannot accomplish. In this talk, along with making the case for integrating computation beyond basic data analysis in undergraduate laboratory experiences/courses, I shall provide some detailed examples of effective implementations of the three-legged stool approach to physics education.
      • A Walk on the Random Side*

      • HC02
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:30PM
      • by Norman Chonacky
      • Type: Invited
      • Laboratories are excellent venues for learning about numerical modeling of physical systems because the results of numerical simulations can be applied directly to designing experiments, and understanding and evaluating their results. A significant classof such simulations uses Monte Carlo methods, whose algorithms embody random numbers. In this talk I describe examples of such simulations for specific physical systems that could be explored in experiments at several different course levels. Applications range from experimental fluctuations to diffusive processes. There are considerable benefits from early student engagement with such integrated computation-experiment exercises. Understanding experimental uncertainty and predicting probabilities for outcomes are omnipresent tasks in SMET activities. Less obvious may be the roles Monte Carlo methods play in artificial intelligence and in data mining. Finally, these exercises will serve those who wish to learn some useful things about the digital computers for their professional futures. *This work was partially funded by the National Science Foundation under the IUSE program grants DUE-1505278 and DUE-1524963.
      • Of Bugs and Features: Synergistic Learning of Physics and Computation

      • HC03
      • Tue 01/15, 1:30PM - 1:40PM
      • by Luke Conlin
      • Type: Contributed
      • Computational modeling of physical systems is a core disciplinary practice of physics, yet students in high school physics classrooms rarely get opportunities to learn or engage in this practice. One challenge is that learning computational modeling often means learning a computer language, which can distract from learning the physics. C2STEM is a simulation environment and embedding curriculum designed for synergistic learning, such that students’ learning of physics and computation is mutually reinforcing. We present results from several classroom studies where C2STEM served as the students’ laboratory. We find that moments of synergistic learning emerged in surprising ways as students built simulations. For instance, all students encountered the need to debug their code, and often the debugging process proceeded at the intersection of computational thinking and physics disciplinary practices. Debugging involved practices like making predictions based on a model, controlling variables, and refining a model based on empirical observation.
      • Building Experimental Skills Using Arduino, Jupyter, and LabVIEW

      • HC04
      • Tue 01/15, 1:40PM - 1:50PM
      • by Troy Messina
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics undergraduates need to be prepared for a wide variety of careers. The latest AIP data shows approximately half of physics bachelor's degree earners go on to careers or graduate studies in areas other than physics. To prepare students for this future, we have been incorporating laboratory activities that aim to develop a wide range of skills and appeal to a broad set of student interests. It is also our intention to continue preparing students for graduate study in physics. The activities include developing sensing systems with Arduinos and modeling with Glowscript at the introductory level. As students progress to higher level courses such as Modern Physics and Advanced Laboratory, we introduce them to Jupyter notebooks and LabVIEW. In this presentation, we will detail some activities and how we scaffold student learning from introductory to upper-level courses.
      • Using Jupyter Electronic Notebooks in Introductory Physics Laboratories

      • HC05
      • Tue 01/15, 1:50PM - 2:00PM
      • by Tatiana Krivosheev
      • Type: Contributed
      • We present the pros and cons of conversion of the traditional laboratory manuals used in the Introductory Physics courses into an integrated Jupyter notebook: a web-based interactive computational environment to combine code execution, text, mathematics,plots and rich media into a single document. The electronic notebooks are provided to students as a free of charge, electronically shareable file. The Jupyter environment also generates additional student learning opportunities such as numerical simulations and programming.
      • Graphing Challenge and Graph Matching Game

      • HC06
      • Tue 01/15, 2:00PM - 2:10PM
      • by Ersin Tangil
      • Type: Contributed
      • Students have hard times to learn graph questions on kinematics or they just don’t like to learn velocity vs. time, acceleration vs. time, position vs. time graphs with old-school methods. Therefore, teaching graph with motion sensors and graph game willbe demonstrated.
      • Modeling Vessels Filling Pattern Using Video Analysis

      • HC07
      • Tue 01/15, 2:10PM - 2:20PM
      • by Rony Yarden
      • Type: Contributed
      • In this activity, the participants start with developing the theoretical background of filling patterns of different vessels,starting with simple vessels such as graduated cylinders and ending with more complex ones such as Erlenmeyer or bottom round flasks. Given the volume as a function of height and flow rate, the participants will develop the height vs. time function, predict and sketch the graph and perform a set of experiments using actual flasks, dyed water, and video analysis tools to collect the data of the height of the liquid vs. time and match it to their prediction. The activity can be performed in a classroom with available and cheap technology (cell phone camera, stopwatch, spreadsheet and possible video analysis software, Such as Vernier Logger-Pro, Optional).
  • Integration of Computation into the Curriculum on the Departmental Scale

      • Computation in the Physics/Astronomy Curriculum at the University of Arizona

      • FD01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Drew Milsom
      • Type: Invited
      • The physics and astronomy departments at the University of Arizona collectively teach two courses covering programming and numerical methods. Some mixture of C/C++ and Python is generally used. Three-fourths of the numerical methods curriculum is fixed and the remaining one-fourth is left up to the specific instructor. These courses are prerequisites for some upper division courses in each department. In those courses, students may have computational problems on their homework assignments and/or longer computational projects. Additionally, many students will use their computational skills in research credits which are required for each degree. Thus, the students have ample opportunities to practice these skills throughout their degree programs.
      • Computational Physics at Francis Marion University

      • FD02
      • Mon 01/14, 7:00PM - 7:30PM
      • by Larry Engelhardt
      • Type: Invited
      • At Francis Marion University, we have offered a concentration in Computational Physics for the last 20 years. I will talk about how this program has evolved and what we are doing today, and I will provide some tips of “dos and don’ts” for integrating computation.
      • Computation for Physics Careers: Developing and Promoting Essential Skills

      • FD03
      • Mon 01/14, 7:30PM - 8:00PM
      • by Crystal Bailey
      • Type: Invited
      • Many physics students and faculty are aware that computation is a foundational skill for physics research in academic contexts. What many don’t realize is that it is also tremendously valuable in non-academic, private sector environments – which is whereover 60% of physics PhD graduates and over 95% of physics BS graduates will eventually pursue careers. In this talk, I will explore some specific computational skills that are widely used by physicists in the private sector, and provide some advice on how students can best market those skills to potential employers.
      • The Upper-division Two-semester Computational Physics Sequence at TLU

      • FD04
      • Mon 01/14, 8:00PM - 8:10PM
      • by Calvin Berggren
      • Type: Contributed
      • I will present the recently renovated two-semester sequence in computational physics at Texas Lutheran University, covering design goals, student learning objectives, course strategies, content coverage, integration into departmental plans, and results so far.
      • Department Wide Integration of Computation in the Curriculum at a Small Liberal Art University

      • FD05
      • Mon 01/14, 8:10PM - 8:20PM
      • by Timothy Duman Steve Spicklemire

      • Type: Contributed
      • In recent years, the department of physics and earth-space science at the University of Indianapolis has been integrating computation into all of the courses taken by physics majors. This talk will present the steps taken to implement our strategy.
      • Emphasizing Computation for Physics Majors at Western Kentucky University

      • FD06
      • Mon 01/14, 8:20PM - 8:30PM
      • by Richard Gelderman
      • Type: Contributed
      • Western Kentucky University has revised the curriculum required for its physics majors. One of the changes is that our majors will be meaningfully involved in computational solutions all through their undergraduate career. The introductory course for majors, requiring only algebra and trigonometry as a prerequisite, presents the foundations of relativity and the quantized atom. Our calculus-based physics sequence, also taken by other science majors and engineers, recently changed over to the Matter & Interactions textbook and its integrated use of programming. Junior level modern physics, mechanics, and E&M courses require students to use Mathematica for computation and visualization. Instructors for upper level topical classes are now able to go deeper into their material, without having to take time to familiarize students to computation.
  • Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Whats New? ILDs Using Clickers and Video Analysis

      • Interactive Lecture Demonstrations:Whats New? ILDs Using Clickers and Video Analysis

      • CB01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 6:00PM
      • by David Sokoloff Ronald Thornton

      • Type: Invited
      • The results of physics education research and the availability of computer-based tools have led to the development of the active learning materials for the introductory physics course. Some of these materials are designed for hands-on learning in the lab, for example the student-centered laboratory curriculum, RealTime Physics (1),(2). One reason for the success of these materials is that they encourage students to take an active part in their learning. This interactive session will demonstrate through active audience participation materials designed to implement active learning in lecture, Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) (3) including those using clickers and video analysis.
      • Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Effectiveness in Teaching Concepts

      • CB02
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:30PM
      • by Ronald Thornton David Sokolof

      • Type: Invited
      • The effectiveness of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) in teaching physics concepts has been studied using physics education research based, multiple-choice conceptual evaluations. Results of such studies will be presented, including studies withclicker ILDs. These results should be encouraging to those who wish to improve conceptual learning in their introductory physics course.
  • Introducing Computation into Introductory Physics Classes

      • Using LaTeX in Introductory Calculus-Based Physics

      • BC01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Paul Heafner
      • Type: Invited
      • In this talk, I will describe how I introduced LaTeX, a de facto standard typesetting system for mathematical and technical documents, into an introductory calculus-based physics course at a community college. I will include brief demonstrations of all the technology described in the talk, and I will show examples of students work. My thesis is that perhaps LaTeX might be used as an alternative way to introduce computation into introductory courses.
      • Introducing Computation: Getting Started with Help from PICUP*

      • BC02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Marie Lopez del Puerto
      • Type: Invited
      • How do you get started? By learning about what others have done, and then tailoring the approach to fit your preferred mode of instruction, course, institution, etc. The Partnership for Integrating Computation into Undergraduate Physics (PICUP) runs workshops, hosts an online collection of curricular materials, and supports a growing community of interested faculty - all with the main goal of making it easier for faculty to integrate computation into their courses. In this talk, I will discuss different approaches that are used by faculty who integrate computation into introductory physics courses and I will highlight materials in the PICUP collection that are relevant to faculty teaching this type of courses.
      • Expanding Introductory Mechanics with Mathematica(R) Software

      • BC03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 2:40PM
      • by Mark Cunningham
      • Type: Contributed
      • The study of introductory mechanics is greatly restricted by students' mathematical abilities. Discussion of the flight of balls, for example, always excludes wind resistance, except in the single case of a vertically falling object where the solution inone dimension can be obtained analytically. The Mathematica (R) function NDSolve permits the numerical solution of systems of differential equations which can include other aerodynamic terms that do not give rise to closed-form solutions. Introduction of any computer software brings an assortment of additional hurdles but also provides the means for discussion of more realistic problems. I will demonstrate examples of an object subject to velocity-dependent and spin-dependent forces.
      • Radioactive Dice: A User’s Manual

      • BC04
      • Sun 01/13, 2:40PM - 2:50PM
      • by David DeMuth Peggy Norris, Shane Wood, TImothy Young

      • Type: Contributed
      • Utilizing rolled dice to simulate probability of decay of radioactive elements is a well-known hands-on activity, often coins or M&M’s replacing the dice. In a recent educator workshops we guided teachers through the practice using six-sided dice. Moreover 12-sided dice representing daughter emissions were integrated for a more accurate depiction of radioactivity. In recognizing the limitation of using fewer faced dice, we extended the activity with a Google Sheet based Javascript simulation for 20-sided dice with improved results and interpretation via histograms and scatter plots. In this presentation the authors will share a radioactivity user’s manual for teachers.
  • Introductory Courses

      • Engaging Introductory Physics Students in Experimental Design: Achievements and Challenges

      • GG01
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 8:40AM
      • by Rex Taibu Vazgen Shekoyan, William Cobern

      • Type: Contributed
      • We reformed verification labs into deductive design labs in which introductory level physics students were first introduced to the theory, terminology and equipment and then guided to design and carry out their own verification experiments. Two instructors taught both the experimental (deductive design labs) and control sections (verification labs) for four semesters. Normalized gains in science process skills were significantly higher in the experimental group. Although there was no indication of improved critical thinking skills on the assessed 7 question pairs of Lawson test, the experimental group performed significantly higher on two of the seven question pairs that are directly related to control of variables. Written surveys indicated the various lab design skills the experimental group learned as well as challenges and experiences going through the design processes. Our study informs another approach to engage students in scientific inquiry aside from the common inductive inquiry approach.
      • Incorporating Service Learning and HACD into College Physics Curricula

      • GG02
      • Tue 01/15, 8:40AM - 8:50AM
      • by Stephanie Bailey
      • Type: Contributed
      • As part of an introductory physics course for life science majors at UC Santa Cruz, students learn about the physics behind musical instruments. The sounds made by musical instruments are possible because of standing waves, which come from the interference between waves traveling in both directions along a string or a tube. This presentation describes an effort in spring 2018 to incorporate service learning and humanities, arts, crafts, and design (HACD) practices into the college physics curricula. Students were tasked with designing and building musical instruments to donate to a K-6 school in Southern Leyte, Philippines. Service learning is a philosophy by which students make meaningful contributions to the benefit of others while at the same time developing their own knowledge in an area of study. Consistent with the university’s commitment to sustainability and environmental responsibility, instruments were made from recycled “junk” materials. Grading was based on creativity, innovation, workmanship, and performance of a standard musical scale and tune.
      • The Cognitive Space in Introductory Physics

      • GG03
      • Tue 01/15, 8:50AM - 9:00AM
      • by Sergio Flores Mario Ramirez, Maria Gonzalez, Natividad Nieto, Maria Quiñones

      • Type: Contributed
      • Many introductory physics students have understanding problems. One possible reason is a lack of versatility to transit among several kinds of mathematical representations. In addition, students need to handle reasoning abilities to move about situationsbased on a context-concept understanding design. This conceptual physics students’ understanding depends on the ability to use of: 1) mathematical representations, 2) concepts, and 3) contexts. The combination of these three cognitive variables help students to develop a functional understanding. This combination is called the cognitive space. Some students develop conceptual understanding through a didactic process designed on the three planes that structures this cognitive space. We believe that a semiotic-conceptual-context learning proposal could help students through an important physics understanding process.
      • Models for Coin Resonance-Frequency Analysis

      • GG04
      • Tue 01/15, 9:00AM - 9:10AM
      • by Isaiah McElvain
      • Type: Contributed
      • Little research has been done to study the mathematical relationship between the resonance frequencies and the physical properties of a coin. This work describes our exploration of that relationship. We began by measuring the resonant frequencies of a large number of different coins. We then used dimensional analysis to create a model that agrees with the measured frequencies of quarters, dimes, and pennies with approximately 5% error. We aim to refine this model so it can be used to predict the frequencies of any coin, as well as predict the resonance frequencies of any thin metal disk.
      • 10 Reasons to NOT Use the Matter and Interactions Textbook

      • GG05
      • Tue 01/15, 9:10AM - 9:20AM
      • by James Clarage
      • Type: Contributed
      • The author used the modern "Matter and Interactions" textbook and curriculum for a one-year trial in one section of his Introductory Physics course. This talk documents 10 reasons you should NOT use this alternative textbook and curriculum with your students. A larger message of this (tongue in cheek) talk is my hope to reaffirm that introductory physics education is just fine using the time-tested approach, and that most proposed innovations (e.g. increased focus on fundamental principles, changing the standard order of topics, inclusion of ideas from modern physics, acknowledging the existence of atoms, using computational solutions to problems) are unnecessary. To those considering modernizing their approach to teaching, this talk serves as a cautionary (and hopefully entertaining) tale. To those dead-set against changing how and what they teach, this talk serves as a potent confirmation bias.
      • Conservation of Momentum and Constraints on Energy Loss

      • GG06
      • Tue 01/15, 9:20AM - 9:30AM
      • by Asim Gangopadhyaya Jonathan Bougie

      • Type: Contributed
      • We reflect on several examples in which loss of energy is easily computed, starting with the inelastic collision of two objects. For these examples, we find that the systems have two well-delineated parts that exchange energy with each other until they reach a shared equilibrium with an overall loss of energy. The equilibrium energy in each case is uniquely determined by a constraint imposed by another conservation law, regardless of the dissipation mechanism. In particular, we discuss how this feature manifests in a suite of four well-known and disparate problems, and show that all four share a common mathematical formalism. We demonstrate application of this formalism to determine the energy loss for a final example.
      • Tackling Belongingness Uncertainty in Physics

      • GG07
      • Tue 01/15, 9:30AM - 9:40AM
      • by Ruth Saunders Carla Quintero

      • Type: Contributed
      • Participation of women in physics is still very low (~20%-APS data). This paper describes some of the methods being used at Humboldt State University, a Hispanic-serving institution in rural California. In particular looking at other ways to embrace yourscientific identity and develop self efficacy, rather than traditional science culture. It discusses Crafternoon and the Paranormal Physics Society, both of which are well attended by majors from all STEM disciplines.
  • Introductory Labs/Apparatus

      • Interference Fringe and Diffraction by Using Two Glass Plates

      • FI01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 6:40PM
      • by Jung Bog Kim Chang-won Kang, Hyen-Jung Nam

      • Type: Contributed
      • A double-slit interference fringe can be produced by using just two glass plates. A laser passes through a small gap between two close panels. A part of the laser beam is diffracted, and other part is refracted. We are able to produce a diffraction pattern by a single slit or interference fringe by a double slit by controlling the angle between two plates. We can change very easily interference fringe spacing by changing this angle. We are able to measure the wavelength of the laser by measuring this fringes.
      • Implementing Non-Prescriptive Experiments in the Introductory Laboratory

      • FI02
      • Mon 01/14, 6:40PM - 6:50PM
      • by Nicholas Mauro Michael Olson

      • Type: Contributed
      • Introductory laboratories offer unique opportunities to practice experimentation, reasoning and critical thinking skills. When a non-physics major takes a physics class that has a laboratory, the development of these skills have been cited as one of the most important experiences by that student’s home department. The laboratory experience must provide the student with the opportunity to make fundamental decisions, analyze the results of those decisions, revise thinking based on observational evidence, and learn from the process. In light of recent studies suggesting that experiments without a prescriptive experimental procedure can be effective, we present results from a pilot study modifying the laboratory experience in an introductory algebra-based physics course at a small college to include non-prescriptive experiments. In this talk, we discuss the development of the laboratory, the structure of a two-week experiment with three opportunities for student-driven critical analysis, and our initial results on the efficacy of this approach.
      • More MATLAB Labs Using Mobile Phone and Public Data

      • FI03
      • Mon 01/14, 6:50PM - 7:00PM
      • by Duncan Carlsmith
      • Type: Contributed
      • Mobile phone inertial sensor, optical, and acoustic data, and public data, all analyzed with MATLAB, enable beginning physics students to engage in science in new ways. This talk will describe a few novel examples including: 1) A mobile phone camera calibration lab with computer vision analysis through which students can understand 3d Ruler apps and operationally how we see the world. 2) An analysis of mobile phone recordings of acoustic N-waves from a spark generator to augment and test a systematic error in a standard free fall experiment. 3) Downloading and fitting observations of orbits of stars around the Sagittarius A* black hole and statistical analysis of 1/2 million rock, paper, scissors games as examples of verifying claims and discovery through public data. Technical details and learning goals will be described.
      • Producing Cold Atomic Beam Using a Pyramidal Mirror

      • FI04
      • Mon 01/14, 7:00PM - 7:10PM
      • by Sunyoung Seo Eunkang Kim, Ashish Sharma, Juntae Koh, Jung Bog Kim

      • Type: Contributed
      • Uniform low-speed atomic beams can be applied to atomic optics such as atomic clock or atomic interferometer. In order to generate a slow atomic beam, we use the Magneto Optical Trap (MOT) method to create atomic gas that is kept very close to absolute zero. Magneto optical trap is achieved with both pairs of three orthogonal laser beams and a magnetic quadrupole field. In the case of using a pyramidal mirror, three orthogonal laser beams can be performed by only a single beam, which is a relatively simple structure. In this study, the pyramidal mirror of 20X20 mm^2 was used to generate magneto optical trap and atomic beam of Rb atomic gases. The cooling beam for the magneto optical trap consists of three pairs by a pyramidal mirror out of a circularly polarized single incident light. Both a quarter wavelength plate and a mirror are installed to form a pair of light pressure for the light passing through the hole of 6X6 mm^2 made at the apex of the pyramidal mirror. At this time, the number of captured atoms is 1.52X10^7atoms. After the magneto optical trap was formed, using a mirror with a 1mm hole at the center to form a donut-shaped retro-reflected light. Therefore, in the region where there is no reflected light through the hole, the atoms are subjected to the light pressure in the direction of gravity by the incident cooling beam to form an atomic beam eventually. At this time, the average velocity of the atomic beam is 11.3m/s, the velocity distribution component of atomic beam is 4.25m/s, and the temperature of atomic beam is 89mK.
      • New Way of Color Change via Polarizers and Birefringent Film

      • FI05
      • Mon 01/14, 7:10PM - 7:20PM
      • by Yong Wook Cheong
      • Type: Contributed
      • It is well known that color could be observed when white light transmits a stack of polarizer-transparent birefringent film-analyzer and the color could change when a polarizer or birefringent film rotates. However, pattern hidden in the color change is not systematically investigated. In this presentation, we propose a way to implement systematic color change. By simply rotating a polarizer or birefringent film, color change concerning all the three elements of color such as hue, value, and chroma could be implemented. Our demonstration could be easily implemented as an optics experiment in the undergraduate course or secondary school level. It could be also a good topics which show the possibility of integration between physics and art.
      • Using Effective Tools to Increase TAs Consistency in Grading Physics Lab Reports

      • FI06
      • Mon 01/14, 7:20PM - 7:30PM
      • by Merita Haxhia
      • Type: Contributed
      • Traditionally, the physics lab reports are written in a lab notebook and graded by TAs. The students produce individual reports . The huge time dedicated to grading them jeopardised the consistency in grading. Replacing it with electronic submission and a group work (one report per group) reduced the time needed to grade the reports. However, consistency was still a concern until we implemented Gradescope. It is an online tool that provides transparency, flexibility, and the most important, consistency. The variety of its features has made the TAs work enjoyable and productive. Entering rubrics, posting grades, and syncing the rosters is simple. In addition, Gradescope has made it easier for the instructor to supervise the graders and check the statistics.
      • Two Birds with One Stone: Engineering Design and Physics Lab

      • FI07
      • Mon 01/14, 7:30PM - 7:40PM
      • by Bob Brazzle
      • Type: Contributed
      • In this talk, I’ll describe an assignment I give my Engineering 101 (computer-aided design) students, in which they design an apparatus I can use for my Introductory Physics course, which most of them will take the following year. The challenge is to design a pocket-sized device that combines the classic bicycle wheel gyroscope demonstrator (using 3/4” ball bearings for rim masses) with an AC generator in which the bearings are replaced by 3/4” magnets. Teams design the device using AutoDesk Inventor software and a MakerBot 3-D printer. Although these students typically don’t know how a generator works, they choose some aspect of the coils to test (number of windings, orientation relative to the rotating magnets, etc.) for my open-ended exploratory generator lab during the E&M semester of Introductory Physics. This benefits students in both courses. I’m happy to share these designs with the attendees.
      • A New Inexpensive Wireless Multisensor for Introductory Labs

      • FI08
      • Mon 01/14, 7:40PM - 7:50PM
      • by Charles Lane Vedant Mehta

      • Type: Contributed
      • We have developed a compact multisensor device that measures around 20 different physical quantities in real time and relays the measurements to a nearby computer via wireless Bluetooth. The set of measurements includes acceleration (3 components), angular velocity (3 components), magnetic field (3 components), temperature and luminosity. The complete set of measurements may be exported to a .csv file for use in a spreadsheet or other data-analysis application. This device may be built by an undergraduate student for around $120. We present sample data collected during the 2017 solar eclipse, from a rotating stool, and from the end of a simple pendulum.
      • A FAN-C Exploration of RC Circuits

      • FI09
      • Mon 01/14, 7:50PM - 8:00PM
      • by Robert Ekey Brandon Mitchell

      • Type: Contributed
      • Recently, small computer fans have been demonstrated to be an effective method for teaching simple resistive circuits both qualitatively [1] and quantitatively [2]. The current through the fans is related to the rotational speed of the fans and allow multiple senses to be engaged (touch, sight, and hearing). The linear relationship between the operational current and applied voltage, provides a nearly constant effective resistance for the fan. This suggests that fans can also be used to explore RC circuits both qualitatively and quantitatively, where the fans act as the resistive elements as well as the indicator. In this presentation, we will demonstrate that computer fans can be used to qualitatively explore the charging and discharging times for RC circuits. By monitoring the voltage across the capacitor as a function of time, we will also show that fans can be used for qualitative RC analysis.
      • Conventional Alongside Improvised Physics Laboratory: An Assessment of Effects Tested on Students’ Performance in Heat and Thermodynamics

      • FI10
      • Mon 01/14, 8:00PM - 8:10PM
      • by Kizito NDIHOKUBWAYO Jean UWAMAHORO, Irenee NDAYAMBAJE

      • Type: Contributed
      • Science education in Rwandan schools still faces a number of challenges including the lack or insufficient lab equipment for science experiments. This paper describes research conducted to assess the effects of using improvised experiments alongside conventional laboratory. The assessment was done using a pre and post-test in heat and thermodynamics physics topic. The study involved 85 lower secondary school students from the eastern province. In terms of data analysis, the t-test was used for independent samples of post-test scores obtained from the improvised experiment and conventional experiment groups, therefore a t-Stat of 2.74 over a t-Critical of 1.98 was found, therefore, there was statistical significance between these experiment groups in favor of improvised experiment group. As a recommendation, improvised experiments should be considered for use in case there is the lack or inadequate conventional laboratory since it demonstrates analogous students ‘achievement alongside the conventional one.
      • A Modified Car Collision Lab Activity

      • FI11
      • Mon 01/14, 8:10PM - 8:20PM
      • by Pei Xiong-Skiba
      • Type: Contributed
      • Students in introductory physics courses tend to be “happy” as long as they can solve a problem. They rarely challenge themselves to interpret the results of their calculations. In our collision lab, we ask students to do various simple calculations to predict what will happen when two carts collide elastically or in-elastically, then verify their predictions through experiment. Students responded to this lab activity more positively, comparing with most of the other lab activities in the lab course. Our post-lab tests revealed that students were able to master and retain the key concepts reasonably well.
      • Implementing Service Learning into the Introductory Astronomy Lab

      • FI12
      • Mon 01/14, 8:20PM - 8:30PM
      • by Tracy Hodge Jon Saderholm

      • Type: Contributed
      • Service Learning is a form of experiential learning that integrates meaningful community service with content instruction. The weekly laboratory section of an introductory astronomy course was re-designed to facilitate a service-learning project. Students worked in small groups to learn cycles of diurnal and annual motion, coordinate systems, seasonal constellations, and phases of the moon using an opensource desktop planetarium. Students also learned how to operate a small telescope and plan an observing session. During weeks 10 and 11 of the 14-week semester, students held a series of public star parties for local schools, scouting groups, and families of non-traditional students. We discuss the impact of the project on students’ disposition towards science, sense of personal efficacy, and engagement in the course. We will also include discussion around the feasibility of implementing service learning into larger lecture courses.
  • John Hubisz: Celebrating 59 Years of AAPT Distinguished Service

      • John Hubisz: Celebrating 59 Years of AAPT Distinguished Service

      • EF
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 5:30PM
      • by Chuck Stone
      • Type: Panel
      • In his 59 years of AAPT distinguished service, John Hubisz touched students, faculty, staff, and friends in K-12 public and parochial schools, two- and four-year colleges, and research universities. Peers and protégés will share fond memories of John’s achievements, and what current AAPT members can do, through the camaraderie, support, and opportunities AAPT offers. John served over 35 AAPT Committees, brought attention to deficiencies in middle school science texts, promoted diversity, raised awareness of senior physicists, and inspired AAPT Sections. He was active in his church, his local community, and a ravenous collector and reader of fine books. Panelists Chuck Stone (Colorado School of Mines), Tom O’Kuma (Lee College), Chris Gould (North Carolina State University), Joe Heafner (Catawba Valley Community College), Aaron Titus (High Point University), Steve Iona (University of Denver), and Jola Hubisz will discuss John’s gentle yet effective character. Audience members will be invited to share personal perspectives.
  • Making Out-of-School STEM Welcoming Across Languages

      • Strategies to Promote Materials Science and Engineering: A Community-University Collaboration for Graduate, Undergraduate and K12 Students

      • DH01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:30AM
      • by F. Robles Hernandez A. Reyes, M. Galindo, J. Ortiz

      • Type: Invited
      • Here we provide an overview of pedagogical strategies used to develop “A Community-University-Pubic School Collaboration for Graduate, Undergraduate and K-12 Students.” This project was guided by federal, state, and local policies and criteria. The purpose of the project was to expose at-risk and high-poverty secondary, migrant and second-language learning school students to career and college readiness grounded in Texas Standards in ECH-12 College Readiness and University College of Technology Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (STEM). Instructional strategies were used to stimulate the learners’ inquiry, critical thinking, collaboration and communication skills using hands-on, science, technology, engineering, and math-based activities. Communication skills, self-esteem, racially based success identify and role modeling were foundation strategies used to promote success in higher education for first-generation college students. The use of international, Spanish-other language speaking graduate students and faculty are crucial to this project. A brief introduction to graduate school education is also provided.
      • District Supported K-12 STEM-Embedded Learning for All

      • DH02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 12:00PM
      • by Kevin Thomas Jennifer Borges

      • Type: Invited
      • This presentation will highlight strategies implemented by Orange County Public Schools (OCPS) to foster student success in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) subjects. As a large, diverse school district in Central Florida, with over 31,000 English Language Learners, OCPS has set a high goal of addressing equity in all schools and narrowing the achievement gap in STEM for its most vulnerable student populations. Instead of keeping STEM initiatives localized to its highest performing schools, OCPS invests resources into establishing successful programs for all schools district-wide. Several school-based programs will be highlighted with a focus on how they are supported by the district through a digital-blended learning platform designed to increase access for all students district-wide. With a further emphasis on K-8, district-led initiatives include coding in science and STEM labs, along with Project-Based Learning (PBL) and Promoting Science Among English Language Learners (P-SELL) programs embedded in the curriculum.
  • Medical Physics and Technology

      • Accelerator Production of Isotopes for Medical Applications

      • GC01
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 9:00AM
      • by Suzanne Lapi*
      • Type: Invited
      • The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging and therapy has led to an interest in research for cross-section measurements, accelerator targetry and separation techniques for radioisotope production. For example, the production and purification of longer-lived positron emitting radionuclides have been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr) are produced via irradiation of solid targets on the UAB TR24 cyclotron. Additionally, our recent research has further expanded the toolbox of PET tracers to include additional isotopes such as 52Mn, 55Co, 45Ti and others. Our group has focused on the development of novel isotope production technologies including solid target systems and purification chemistry of these isotopes to enable both preclinical and clinical imaging research for many diseases.
      • A Time-Dependent Axon Model Circuit Laboratory

      • GC02
      • Tue 01/15, 9:00AM - 9:10AM
      • by Mickey Kutzner Fritz Miot

      • Type: Contributed
      • This circuit lab is a time-dependent extension of an extant steady-state axon lab[1] with a proven track record among life-science students. The model ladder circuit includes resistors, RA, representing the axon interior cytoplasm, additional resistors, RM, representing the resistance of the axon membrane and capacitors, CM, representing the axon membrane capacitance. The equivalent impedance of the circuit is discussed through infinite-series analysis. Students measure the speed and evolution of signal quality as a voltage signal introduced at one end of the circuit (representing the axon hillock) spreads passively down the long axis of the model axon circuit.
  • Monday Registration

      • Monday Registration

      • REG05
      • Mon 01/14, 7:00AM - 5:00PM
      • Leti Marquez
      • Type: Registration
  • Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

      • Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

      • EXH03
      • Sun 01/13, 10:30AM - 11:00AM

      • Type: Exhibit Hall
      • Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

      • EXH08
      • Mon 01/14, 10:30AM - 11:00AM
      • Robert Finnegan
      • Type: Exhibit Hall
  • Morning Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - 4K Ultra HD Sports Action Camera

      • Morning Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - 4K Ultra HD Sports Action Camera

      • EXH10
      • Mon 01/14, 10:45AM - 10:50AM

      • Type: Exhibit Hall
      • The Camera has the versatility to capture in crystal clear 4K, 2K, 1080P or 720P HD. Capture your action shots in crisp 12MP quality and at an ultra-wide angle of 170° as single shots or cluster shots, in real time or with an automatic timer. Capture your still photos and action shots in 12MP quality! You can take photos as single or cluster shots, take them in real time or set an automatic timer from 2s to 60s automatically at your chosen interval. Take your Action Camera with you whether in the pool, the lake or even the ocean. Imagine capturing the vibrant colours and stunning views of exotic wildlife in 4K Ultra HD while snorkeling or scuba diving. Raffles will take place in the AAPT exhibit hall. Tickets can be purchased at the AAPT registration desk. Tickets must be purchased 30 minutes before the raffle. Must be present to win.
  • Morning Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - Echo Spot

      • Morning Raffle in the Exhibit Hall - Echo Spot

      • EXH04
      • Sun 01/13, 10:15AM - 10:16AM

      • Type: Exhibit Hall
      • Echo Spot brings you everything you love about Alexa, in a stylish and compact design that can show you things. Just ask to see the weather, get the news with a video flash briefing, set an alarm, see lyrics with Amazon Music, see your calendar, browse and listen to Audible audiobooks, and more. Personalize your Spot with a collection of clock faces to suit your style or set a photo background from Prime Photos. Plus, make calls to friends and family or make video calls to anyone with an Echo Spot, Echo Show, or the Alexa App. With tens of thousands of skills, Alexa is always getting smarter and adding new features. Just ask Alexa to control your TV, request an Uber, order a pizza, and more. Raffles will take place in the AAPT exhibit hall. Tickets can be purchased at the AAPT registration desk. Tickets must be purchased 30 minutes before the raffle. Must be present to win.
  • My Favorite Demo that Works - How & Why?

      • Measuring the Speed of Sound with a Supercomputer: A Demonstration

      • DD01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:10AM
      • by Cody Trevillian* Alberto Rojo

      • Type: Contributed
      • Utilizing a conceptual understanding of wave behavior, this demonstration presents an intuitive method for quantitative calculation and verification of the speed of sound using qualitative measurements. It is readily understood that a lidar speed gun measures the velocity of a vehicle using consistent emissions of infrared light. A similar methodology is used here with emissions of sound waves instead of infrared light. Using two handheld supercomputers (i.e. smartphones) and a hallway, a pair of investigators can use their ability to hear (qualitative measurement) in order to determine the velocity of sound (quantitative calculation) by emitting consistent metronome-like pulses. The activity presented here allows for a more accessible study of the speed of sound, which can be used to make a bridge in understanding that would otherwise go unspanned.
      • What is in the Box: Engaging in the Scientific Method

      • DD02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:10AM - 11:20AM
      • by Aaron Lee
      • Type: Contributed
      • A large fraction of the university student body takes an introductory physics or astronomy course as part of their major or as a broader education requirement. For the latter, this is possibly the last science course they will ever take. Sadly, students often leave these courses able to regurgitate formulae but struggle to simply define ‘science.’ Furthermore, students rarely engage in the scientific method, because labs are either non-existent or focus on reproducing previously known results. My cost-effective demonstration presents a sealed, indestructible, pink box, and students must devise and perform experiments to determine its contents. This 20-minute activity concludes with the class reaching an evidence-based conclusion. Overall, it concisely demonstrates the process of science and shows that it is messier than the textbooks suggest: particularly, executing the scientific method is rarely a one-way checklist, there is never enough data, and personal biases (pink box=doughnuts?) can both assist and mislead.
      • Speaker Powered Chladni Plates and SPS Outreach*

      • DD03
      • Mon 01/14, 11:20AM - 11:30AM
      • by Amanda Williams
      • Type: Contributed
      • Ideally, a demo can both elicit a sense of awe from the audience and emphasize a physics concept(s) in a tangible way. Chladni plates are metal plates with sand sprinkled on them that show the plate's various vibrational modes. They're often played with a violin bow, and in front of a crowd. Playing a Chladni plate through a speaker and amplifier elicits a similar response, and is adapted to be interactive with participants. Through Chladni plates, one can reinforce concepts such as resonance, properties of waves, and acoustics. 100 of these demos were made this summer and can be requested for free to SPS chapters across the country, known as the SPS Science Outreach Catalyst Kit (SOCK). Including explanations to different audiences, the SOCK provides all tools necessary to undergraduate students to successfully foster curiosity and passion for physics through public outreach.
      • Simple Centre of Mass Demonstration

      • DD04
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 11:40AM
      • by Tetyana Antimirova
      • Type: Contributed
      • Simple demonstrations on centre of mass can be performed by balancing everyday objects. Try to hold a metre stick on the top of your hands when the hands are far apart. What happens if you try to bring your hands together, moving the forefingers supporting the object from beneath towards one another very slowly? It is often assumed that the stick will become unbalanced in the process of moving the fingers. However, the opposite is true: it is rather difficult to make the long stick lose its balance. The session attendees will discuss what physical concepts can be learned from this simple demonstration.
  • Ordering of Topics

      • The Order of Topics Doesn't Matter (...But It Really Does)

      • by Corey Gerving
      • Type: Contributed
      • In the late 20th Century, student attitudes towards introductory physics at West Point had reached an all-time low. An increasing number of failures were occurring on the final exam that had seen acceptable scores in previous iterations of the course. The assessment was made that students were not seeing the relevance of the material to their future profession. The program director revised the entire two-course sequence around a fictional road to war, where the material in the course was taught in the order one would expect to see it on the battlefield. The topics started with nuclear physics as part of a hostile act towards an ally. Next the students learned geometric and wave optics as part of the reconnaissance of the battlefield phase, and so on. Initial student interest immediately increased, and performance also improved. However, after several years of teaching in this order, we decided to return to the typical order of teaching introductory physics. This talk will explore the decision making process of both sequences.
      • Learning Goal Oriented Topic Order

      • DE01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:10AM
      • by Thomas Herring
      • Type: Contributed
      • A description of the motivation and results from a learning goal oriented redesign of a two semester calculus-based physics sequence taught at a small two-year college. The identification of broad concept learning goals such as, "Describe how objects move through space" motivated a change in the usual order of topics compared to that of a typical text. The learning goal oriented order of both first and second semester calculus-based physics courses will be presented. Student gains and losses in both conceptual and quantitative assessments will be addressed as well as changes in student attitudes towards some topics.
      • Learning Physics: Ordering Topics, Concepts and Applications

      • DE02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:10AM - 11:20AM
      • by R. Daryl Pedigo
      • Type: Contributed
      • Which should come first? Should it be conservation laws or forces? Should concepts and principles precede, follow, or be integrated with equations and applications? Should we build each topic to generality by studying simple cases first, or begin with the general treatment and then specialize? These considerations are not only related, but are all necessary elements in structuring a coherent physics course to foster learning at any level. The presentation will draw upon anecdotal evidence from four decades of teaching experience almost equally divided between a large community college and a major university. A bit of actual supporting evidence will also be offered.
      • Momentum First and Gauss (nearly) Last

      • DE03
      • Mon 01/14, 11:20AM - 11:30AM
      • by Bruce Sherwood Ruth Chabay, Aaron Titus

      • Type: Contributed
      • Since fundamental physics principles are at the heart of what we want students to learn, our mechanics course is structured around the Momentum Principle, the Energy Principle, and the Angular Momentum Principle. Starting with momentum and 3D vectors establishes the centrality of these concepts, and is surprisingly easy for students. Emphasizing the atomic nature of matter, thermal physics is easily unified with mechanics. E&M starts with the field concept, and this concept remains central throughout the entire semester, even in the analysis of circuits. Gauss's law and Ampere's law are delayed to nearly the end of the semester, to a time when students have become very familiar with patterns of field in 3D space. Magnetic field is introduced very early in the semester, to provide students with a second example of a field, deepening their understanding of the field concept. See matterandinteractions.org.
      • Project-Based Introductory Physics Course

      • DE04
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 11:40AM
      • by Ian Redmount
      • Type: Contributed
      • For two decades I have explored a novel approach to the calculus-based introductory physics course: a series of projects, extensive examples which students explore in as much depth and detail as their mathematical backgrounds will stand, learning the principles of physics along the way. For example: The flight of a model rocket, with and without aerodynamic drag, introduces Galilean kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, the process of approximation, and even Einsteinian kinematics and dynamics. A billiards shot illustrates the mechanics of collisions and rotation; the details of an actual Moon flight the laws of Universal Gravitation and Planetary Motion. Calculating the classical radius and the gyromagnetic ratio of the electron introduces electrostatics and magnetism; the Maxwell equations and their consequences are applied to the problem of radio communication with a submarine. This approach has given rise to a new textbook, and notable student success.
      • Waves Before Mechanics

      • DE05
      • Mon 01/14, 11:40AM - 11:50AM
      • by Deborah Roudebush
      • Type: Contributed
      • Beginning the year with waves, sound and light starts things off with topics of personal interest to most students. This approach has the advantage of leading off with constant velocity concepts, saving for later the most challenging topic of all : acceleration.
  • PER and Student Motivation: Beyond Single Course Content

      • PER and Student Motivation: Beyond Single Course Content

      • FE
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Gary White
      • Type: Panel
      • Motivation Enhances Conceptual Learning, Not Procedural Training

      • FE01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Eric Kuo Kelly Boden, Quentin King-Shepard, Timothy Nokes-Malach, Tanner Wallace

      • Type: Panel
      • A student’s motivation for learning impacts how they approach learning in the classroom and, ultimately, what they learn. Motivational factors such as self-efficacy and achievement goals have been shown to predict students’ academic performance generally. Yet, little work has been done to investigate how motivation impacts different types of learning. In a study of 6th-grade science students, we looked at how different motivational factors predict different learning outcomes, finding that self-efficacy predicted conceptual learning and transfer while performance goals (i.e., aiming to perform better than others on school tasks) predicted use of proportional reasoning. No motivational factors investigated predicted procedural application of a formula. These results suggest that successful attainment of more challenging learning goals may depend on students’ motivation to learn.
      • How Students Perceive an Instructor’s Emphasis on Limiting Case Analysis

      • FE02
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Tiffany-Rose Sikorski
      • Type: Panel
      • Limiting case analysis is important to practicing physicists. Yet, there is little concrete guidance for physics educators, and a lack of consensus in the research community, about how to help students learn, and learn from, limiting case analysis. This study first reviews existing literature to find commonalities and variations in how instructors encourage and assess students’ limiting case analysis. Then, the study considers the students’ perspective, examining written work and interviews with successive cohorts of physics students, all of whom have completed a course with the same instructor who emphasizes limiting case analysis in his teaching. Overlap between student and instructor perspectives adds further support to the claim that limiting case analysis could play a pivotal role in the development of physics expertise.
      • Motivation of Physics Students' Self-checking Behavior*

      • FE03
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by David Meltzer Dakota King

      • Type: Panel
      • For an investigation into physics students' mathematical difficulties, we have administered written diagnostic tests to over 3000 students. Students' responses to elementary questions on trigonometry, algebra, and graphing reflected a large number of operational errors, to a degree that could significantly interfere with success in an introductory physics course. However, individual problem-solving interviews with students revealed that, when simply asked to explain their solutions to the problems, students would very frequently discover and correct a large proportion of their errors with no additional input from the interviewer. Consequently, we propose that integrating multiple "self-checking" steps into guided quantitative problem-solving exercises may help habituate students to perform simple checks that could significantly impact their problem-solving success.
      • Assessing Physics Quantitative Literacy Development

      • FE04
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Suzanne Brahmia Alexis Olsho, Trevor Smith, Andrew Boudreaux

      • Type: Panel
      • Physics can play a central role developing quantitative literacy, helping students bridge the “math world” and “physical world.” Physics Quantitative Literacy (PQL) is a set of interconnected skills and habits of mind that support quantitative reasoning about the physical world. In this poster, we present the PIQL, Physics Inventory of Quantitative Literacy (currently under development), which assesses students’ proportional reasoning, co-variational reasoning, and reasoning with signed quantities. PIQL is a reasoning inventory that can provide snapshots of student ideas that are continuously developing. Item distractors are constructed based on the different established natures of the mathematical objects in physics contexts (e.g. the negative sign as a descriptor of charge type and the negative sign as the operation of subtraction). An analysis of student responses on PIQL will allow for assessment of hierarchical reasoning patterns, and thereby potentially map the emergence of flexibility between the various natures throughout the introductory sequence.
      • Fluidity in Epistemic Games

      • FE05
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Mark Eichenlaub Edward Redish

      • Type: Panel
      • We began analyzing problem-solving data imagining that students went into a particular stage of the problem (e.g. the "check your answer" phase) with a fairly fixed set of ideas about what would happen, what types of evidence were relevant, and what steps were allowed. We described these expectations and how students used them to solve problems using the framework of epistemic games. Here, we present cases where students seemed to break the underlying rules of epistemic games or repurpose them to entirely new goals (e.g. using them to help find an unknown answer rather than check an answer candidate). We conclude that student reasoning was more fluid than we previously appreciated and that an approach using dynamic finer-grained epistemological resources might be more appropriate.
      • Change in Multivariable Functions*

      • FE06
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Corinne Manogue Paul Emigh, Elizabeth Gire, David Roundy, Michael Vignal

      • Type: Panel
      • For 22 years, the Paradigms in Physics project at Oregon State University has been taking a holistic approach to the entire upper-division physics curriculum for majors. How do we plan for students’ understanding of concepts to build across time and across physics subdisciplines? How do we choose representations to teach early on that maximize the powerful links to what students need to know later? How do we design activities that engage students with key foundational ideas or that challenge students to expand on their current level of understanding to tackle ever more complicated tasks? We will address these questions, using as our exemplar the ways in which we explore the concept of change and rates of change in physical situations that involve more than two interrelated variables. *This work was supported in part by NSF grant DUE-1323800.
      • What Basic Skills Should Introductory Physics Students Have?

      • FE07
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Andrew Heckler
      • Type: Panel
      • Both anecdotally and empirically, it is a familiar observation that many students are not proficient in very basic skills used in STEM courses at all levels. A natural reaction to such a deficit is to help students improve proficiency in such skills. I will present results from our highly successful efforts to help students practice, master, and retain some “essential skills” via computer-based learning, and some guidelines for building practice content and structure. But this issue is not so straightforward. For example, which basic STEM skills will be useful beyond STEM courses? What are realistic goals for proficiency and retention in a one-year course? Does learning such basic skills help with other instructional goals such as conceptual understanding and complex problem solving? An investigation into answers to these questions seems critical to meaningful progress.
  • PER in Latin America and at Hispanic-Serving Institutions in the US

      • PER in Latin America and at Hispanic-Serving Institutions in the US

      • BE
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 3:30PM
      • by Ramon E. Lopez
      • Type: Panel
      • This session will feature invited speakers from Latin America and Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) in the US who are engaged in Physics Education Research at their institutions. The speakers will give an overview of the kind of work being conducted at their institutions as well as their perspectives on PER issues of particular interest to their respective communities. The aim of the session is to provide the broader PER community some insight into work being conducted in Latin America and at HSIs in the US, as well as to generate ideas for research, collaboration, and enhanced “Broader Impacts” sections in proposals submitted to the NSF.
      • Research in Conceptual Understanding: The Case of Latin America

      • BE01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Genaro Zavala
      • Type: Invited
      • Physics Education Research (PER) began in the late 1970s with an emphasis on research on conceptual understanding. Even though other lines of research have contributed to the consolidation of PER, studies on conceptual understanding remain valid and essential. In this talk, I will present the basics of this line of research, the methods that are used and how Latin American groups have contributed.
      • Physics Education Research in Brazil

      • BE02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Katemari Rosa
      • Type: Invited
      • Brazil is the largest country in Latin America, with over 200,000,000 people. With national standards, and facing a curriculum reform, Brazil has the largest federal sponsored textbook distribution in the world and physics is a mandatory discipline in middle and high school all over the country. It is in this scenario that a large Physics Education Research community has been established in the past decades. With over 350 PER groups around the country, specialized journals, and international collaborations, Brazil has been developing quality and diverse PER, in spite of adversities. This talk will present a panorama of PER in Brazil and points of possible connections with research made in the States and worldwide.
      • Physics Education Research: Optimizing, Leveraging and Enabling Change at FIU

      • BE03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 3:00PM
      • by Laird Kramer
      • Type: Invited
      • Physics education research at Florida International University (FIU) began in 2003. Early efforts established Modeling Instruction, transformed labs and launched an undergraduate Learning Assistant (LA) program. The initial efforts showed improved learning, attitudes about physics, and student success, and, in concert with other reforms, led to a dramatic increase in the number of physics majors at FIU. The early work was used to create momentum to continue and expand educational change on campus, leading to an institution-wide STEM education transformation movement that engages students, faculty and administrators. Key elements facilitating these efforts include research, collaborations and integrating culturally relevant instructional approaches into the reforms. FIU is a public research university in Miami serving over 57,000 students, the majority of whom come from historically underrepresented groups. The talk will focus on the mechanisms, strategies, and partnerships that enabled PER to thrive at FIU.
      • PER at UT Arlington

      • BE04
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:30PM
      • by Ramon Lopez
      • Type: Invited
      • In this panel discussion I will outline the kind of work in Physics Education Research (PER) that we have done at UT Arlington, a Hispanic Serving Institution. Many of the challenges facing UT Arlington are common to other urban, comprehensive universities. I will make the case that understanding how best to serve students in physics courses at such institutions is an important avenue of investigation for PER.
  • PER: Assessment, Grading and Feedback

      • Identifying Test Bias in Graduate Physics Written Qualifying Exams

      • HI01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 12:40PM
      • by Mary Chessey
      • Type: Contributed
      • Measurement and testing in education provide useful strategies and techniques for understanding how to gauge levels of cognitive attributes of students. Assessments that are used to determine degree attainment, such as qualifying exams in physics graduate programs (the Preliminary Exam), are high-stakes and warrant careful consideration in their design and implementation. In physics, where success is often believed to be the result of innate brilliance, stereotypes about intelligence contribute to underperformance and under-evaluation of members of groups that are underrepresented in physics. High-stakes assessments, such as the Preliminary Exam, are often places where differences in average group performance are found. To ascertain whether the exam is free from bias and accurately measures physics knowledge and skills for various groups of students, techniques for estimating differential validity of the exam are used, namely investigation of the relation between Preliminary Exam performance and other measures of academic and physics preparation.
      • Overview of Research-based Assessments that Go Beyond Physics Content

      • HI02
      • Tue 01/15, 12:40PM - 12:50PM
      • by Adrian Madsen Sarah McKagan, Cassandra Paul, Eleanor Sayre

      • Type: Contributed
      • There is a large corpus of research-based assessments that go beyond physics content, for example, assessments of attitudes and beliefs about physics, epistemologies and expectations, problem solving, self-efficacy, reasoning skills, lab skills, and assessments from cognate fields to physics such as math. These assessments capture many aspects of “thinking like a physicist” that physics faculty care about. However, faculty often don’t know that these assessments are available and which to use in their course. We have written a resource letter where we discuss the details of these non-physics-content research-based assessments and research-based teaching observation protocols, including the research validation, instructional level, format, and themes, to help faculty find the assessment that most closely matches their goals. We also compare related assessments and give recommendations on when to use each. In our talk, we will give an overview of these assessments, all of which are available on www.physport.org, paying particular attention to those that are less well known.
      • Developing Instruments to Survey the Informal Physics Landscape

      • HI03
      • Tue 01/15, 12:50PM - 1:00PM
      • by Dena Izadi Claudia Fracchiolla, Noah Finkelstein, Issac Ward, Kathleen Hinko

      • Type: Contributed
      • Informal physics, often called physics outreach, is an opportunity for people to learn physics in non-school settings. Audiences of all ages explore physics by participating in different activities, visiting institutions, or using media to pursue their interests in physics. However, there is no systematic understanding of how informal physics programs are facilitated or assessed. Thus, to gain an understanding of the landscape of informal physics, we have begun to map informal physics education efforts attempted by physics departments in academic institutes and physics national labs in the U.S. Here, we present the development of a survey and an interview protocol designed to produce a preliminary taxonomy of informal physics. We analyze responses from number of institutes during fall 2018 and discuss feedback from this initial data collection. Additionally, we describe best strategies for recruiting and invite groups to contribute to the study.
      • A Rubric for Assessing Thinking Processes in Free-Response Exam Problems

      • HI04
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:10PM
      • by Beth Thacker
      • Type: Contributed
      • We designed a rubric to assess free-response exam problems in order to compare thinking processes evidenced in exams in classes taught traditionally and non-traditionally. The rubric is designed based on Bloom’s taxonomy. We have data on a number of classes taught by the same instructor, one class more traditionally and one taught in an inquiry-based, laboratory-based setting with Socratic dialog pedagogy. We discuss the instrument, present results and present plans for future research.
      • Using quantitative analyses to rank incorrect responses to FMCE questions

      • HI05
      • Tue 01/15, 1:10PM - 1:20PM
      • by Trevor Smith Kyle Louis, Bartholomew Ricci

      • Type: Contributed
      • In an effort to value the ideas that students express by selecting particular responses to multiple-choice assessment questions, we have used various quantitative analyses of data from the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE) to rank the incorrect responses to each question from better to worse. Our overarching goal is to be able to demonstrate growth in understanding if students choose different incorrect responses before and after instruction. Through these analyses we have identified several different categories of questions including: a) questions with no ranking because the vast majority of students choose either the correct or a single incorrect response, b) questions with responses that are better than the most common incorrect response, and c) questions with multiple incorrect responses that are equally likely for low-performing students. We present an overview of these results and discuss similarities and differences between the questions that fall into each category.
      • Dellow Gain, to Analyze FCI Data in Active Learning

      • HI06
      • Tue 01/15, 1:20PM - 1:30PM
      • by Azita Seyed Fadaei
      • Type: Contributed
      • The purpose of this study is comparing Hake gain and Dellow gain to analyze the effects of active learning method (Interactive Conceptual Instruction :ICI) on level of students' understanding in Newton's laws. The main study was calculated by Hake Method. In this paper the results are analyzing by Dellow’s Method. Testing the effectiveness of research's idea by FCI and presenting the data on which it was constructed as Hgain(g), Dgain(G), Dloss and Retention is the goal of this paper. Results show differences in understanding of students in ICI.
  • PER: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

      • Individual vs Social Perspectives of Disability: Impact on Postsecondary Learners

      • HH01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 12:40PM
      • by Jacquelyn Chini Caroline Bustamante, Kamryn Lamons, Westley James

      • Type: Contributed
      • Instructors’ interpretations of disability may impact the experiences of students with disabilities in their classes. Individual perspectives situate disability within the individual by focusing on impairment as a personal deficit to be fixed, cured or addressed through individual adjustment. On the other hand, social perspectives situate disability within the interaction between an individual and an environment, shaped by social, cultural, historical, economic, relational and political factors; in this view, disabling experiences are mitigated by removing barriers and increasing accessibility. We use interviews with three students with disabilities enrolled in postsecondary science courses to demonstrate how individual and social perspectives, held by either the students themselves or their instructors, impact their learning experience. Specifically, we find that the individual perspective is tied to disability stigma and argue that students are better supported by instructors who take on a social perspective of disability.
      • Explicating Definitions of Success through Women’s Metaphors of Success in Physics

      • HH02
      • Tue 01/15, 12:40PM - 12:50PM
      • by Brian Zamarripa Roman Jacquelyn Chini

      • Type: Contributed
      • While our community strives to support individuals from groups underrepresented in physics to achieve “success,” our definitions of success are often unexamined. We characterize success in physics through metaphor analysis of expressions generated by women physicists. We focus on women’s perspectives because feminist standpoint theory posits that members of nondominant groups have a more complete understanding of reality. Interviewees participated in co-analysis to interpret and code their metaphors for causal factors that play a role in attaining success and their characteristics (i.e., stability, locus of causality and control). We construct structural metaphors from themes in the participants’ metaphors and identify similarities in the highlighted attributions. For example, responses with the structural metaphor SUCCESS IN PHYSICS IS A PERPETUAL TASK emphasized their dynamic, internal, controllable effort as a factor leading to success in physics. Explicating these perspectives of success in physics can help the community facilitate the success of all individuals.
      • Identity Performances of Minority Students at MSIs

      • HH03
      • Tue 01/15, 12:50PM - 1:00PM
      • by Xandria Quichocho Jessica Conn, Erin Schipull, Ian Anderson, Eleanor Close

      • Type: Contributed
      • Existing research on underrepresented/minority students focuses mainly on gender or race/ethnicity and largely ignores both the intersection of identities embodied by women of color and the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer (LGBQ) students.In addition, the research typically is conducted at Predominately White Institutions. Our current project examines the personal narratives of women of color and LGBQ physics students at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) through semi-structured interviews. We use the Critical Physics Identity framework developed by Hyater-Adams and colleagues, and the framework of identity as performance developed by Ong, to analyze the interviews in order to better understand how minority students negotiate their multiple intersectional identities in their academic environments. Our analysis focuses on the way students fragment or enhances their minority identities in the physics setting and how this may affect their view of themselves as physicists.
      • The Under-Representation Curriculum: Impacts and Possibilities

      • HH04
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:10PM
      • by Chris Gosling
      • Type: Contributed
      • The Under-Representation Curriculum Project is a modular, student-centered curriculum designed to examine and address equity and inclusion in science. In this session, I will share preliminary observations about the impact that the curriculum has on student participants in the form of data and student responses. I will also discuss possibilities for future research designed to gauge how participating in this curriculum affects student thinking about issues of social justice and their own trajectories relative to science, whether it be physics or another field.
      • Using Autoethnography, a Critical Research Methodology, with Physics Learning Assistants

      • HH05
      • Tue 01/15, 1:10PM - 1:20PM
      • by Myrtle Jones Geraldine Cochran

      • Type: Contributed
      • Autoethnography, a qualitative research method that allows members of a culture to represent their account of the culture, is used in a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, and education (McIlveen, 2008). In authoethnography, “it is the meaning of the story that is important” (McIlveen, 2008).” It is a powerful and liberating research tool in that it allows the autoethnographers to speak against dominant narratives and show how “persons produce history and culture” in concrete situations (Denzin; 2003; Adams, Ellis, and Holman Jones, 2017). In this presentation, we will differentiate between autoethnography and narrative analysis, discuss the goals of autoethnography, and describe contexts in which it is an appropriate research methodology. Finally, we will discuss how autoethnography has been used as a tool for Learning Assistants in an introductory physics course for engineering students to provide an account of their experience as Learning Assistants.
      • Rwandan New Competence-based Curriculum Implementation and Issues: Sector-based Trainers

      • HH06
      • Tue 01/15, 1:20PM - 1:30PM
      • by Kizito NDIHOKUBWAYO Hashituky Habiyaremye, Claude RUKUNDO

      • Type: Contributed
      • This study is investigating the competence-based curriculum (CBC) issues hindering its implementation. To collect data, we surveyed 731 primary and secondary teachers around Rwanda when they were in the third phase of CBC assessment training. These teachers are sector-based trainers (SBTs) where after getting training, are supposed to train their fellow teachers around their schools in their respective sectors. Among them, 571 were male while 148 were female teachers, 256 and 453 were primary and secondary school teachers respectively with an average of teaching experience of 10 years. After analyzing data, we found that 82 percent of respondents appreciate the new curriculum; however, they claim the difficulty to complete it with its loaded content. About 546 teachers were already trainers where at least 109, 180, and 195 trainers attended any training once, twice, and thrice respectively while 176, 153, and 78 in return trained their fellow teachers at least once, twice, and thrice respectively. According to the extent that SBTs are aware of generic competences and cross-cutting issues, about 27.3 per cent know the role and tenacity of generic competences and cross-cutting issues. A statistically significant difference of .005 was found in teacher qualification in favor of secondary school teachers while there was no statistically significant difference in gender. According to the correlation between training attended and teaching experience and the generic competences and cross-cutting issues knowledge, a positive weak correlation was found in line with the number of training while a negative weak correlation was found in line with the teaching experience.
  • PER: Student Content Understanding, Problem-Solving and Reasoning

      • Physics Students' Familiarity with Mathematical Facts and Procedures*

      • DG01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:10AM
      • by David Meltzer Dakota King

      • Type: Contributed
      • As part of our continuing investigation into mathematical difficulties of introductory physics students, we have incorporated new questions on elementary geometry and graphing on our diagnostic tests, and extended our exploration of difficulties with symbolic operations. Our results suggest specific areas in which additional practice by students may be needed to facilitate their problem-solving activities, and warrant additional caution that students' familiarity with basic mathematical facts and procedures cannot necessarily be presumed.
      • Investigating Student Difficulties in Solving Basic Mathematics Problems*

      • DG02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:10AM - 11:20AM
      • by Dakota King David Meltzer

      • Type: Contributed
      • In order to study students’ mathematical difficulties in introductory university physics courses, we have administered written diagnostics and conducted one-on-one problem-solving interviews. During the past three years, we have found that students in both algebra- and calculus-based courses have significant difficulties with solving basic high-school-level mathematics problems. These problems include basic trigonometry and algebra, and are posed in both numeric and symbolic form (“numeric” and “symbolic” refer to the nature of the constant coefficients). We will report our most recent findings on these items, but will focus on a new set of problems which include basic geometry, quadratic equations, and knowledge of trigonometry facts. Student work will be analyzed in detail to identify specific difficulties.
      • Investigating Student Understanding of the Inverse Square Law

      • DG03
      • Mon 01/14, 11:20AM - 11:30AM
      • by Rabindra Bajracharya
      • Type: Contributed
      • The inverse-square law is an extremely important concept widely observed in numerous physical contexts. Various instructional strategies have been used to teach the law in physics and other fields. However, there has not been much research on student understanding of the inverse-square law. We investigated student difficulties with the multiple representations of the law, including graphical, numerical, and symbolic. We constructed two survey versions, one without any physical context and the other with various physical contexts. The questions were presented in multiple representations. We administered the surveys in several mathematics and science courses including second semester algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics. We found that students lack deep understanding of the multiple representations of the inverse-square law, specifically the graphical representation. One common difficulty students manifested was that they were unable to distinguish between the inverse-square and the inverse relationships between two variables.
      • Applying the Energy Conservation Principle: Two Contrasting Reasoning Frames

      • DG04
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 11:40AM
      • by Luke Westbrook Andrew Boudreaux, Emily Borda

      • Type: Contributed
      • The principle of conservation is an important component of a basic model for energy. From informal classroom observations and think-aloud problem-solving interviews, we have identified two reasoning frames, or approaches, students seem to adopt when solving energy conservation scenarios. The first, referred to as “system-frame reasoning,” involves defining a system and then tracking energy inputs and outputs and relating them to energy changes within the system. This approach is familiar to physics instructors and is found in many textbooks. The second approach, “energy-frame reasoning,” involves identifying an amount of energy at a particular time and “following” that energy as it transfers and transforms. This reasoning approach does not necessarily include the strong definition of a system. In this talk, we give a rich description and some examples of these reasoning frames, with some speculation about implications for the learning and teaching of energy.
      • Strategy Flexibility: Choosing Different Systems to Apply the Work-Energy Principle

      • DG05
      • Mon 01/14, 11:40AM - 11:50AM
      • by Grace Baker Thanh Le

      • Type: Contributed
      • An important goal of physics courses is helping students become adaptive problem solvers so that they can approach a wide range of situations. One aspect of adaptive problem solving is strategy flexibility — knowing multiple ways to approach a problem and choosing the most appropriate approach. In this study, we explore students’ strategy flexibility in the context of energy. Specifically, we focus on students’ meta-strategic judgements when choosing a system to apply the work-energy principle in various scenarios. College students enrolled in an introduction mechanics course were interviewed about their rationales of their system choices and asked to compare different options. Preliminary results and analysis will be presented.
      • Methods of Computing Expectation Value: Investigating Students’ Choices and Preferences*

      • DG06
      • Mon 01/14, 11:50AM - 12:00PM
      • by Gina Passante Benjamin Schermerhorn, Homeyra Sadaghiani, Steven Pollock

      • Type: Contributed
      • In a previous study across multiple universities using a similar spins-first quantum mechanics curriculum, we have analyzed students’ written exams for the method they use when solving expectation value problems. Findings revealed that many students prefer using matrix multiplication to solve for the expectation values in contexts when the arguably simpler summation method could be used instead. As part of further investigation, we categorize the methods for solving for the expectation value using the structural features framework of Gire and Price and postulate why certain methods seem to be preferred by students when experts prefer a different method. Individual student interviews provide insight on the aspects of students decision-making while solving expectation value problems across various contexts and assess if students can recognize and apply additional methods.
  • PER: Student and Instructor Support & Professional Development, Program and Institutional Change

      • Team-Based Instructional Change: Examining Differences in Team Setup

      • CG01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 5:40PM
      • by Alice Olmstead Diana Sachmpazidi, Andrea Beach, Charles Henderson

      • Type: Contributed
      • Instructional change efforts involving teams are becoming increasingly popular in higher education. Such teams have the potential to create higher quality outcomes and more sustained improvements than instructors working alone. But not all team-based efforts are successful, and research in this area is limited. We have interviewed 28 leaders of team-based instructional change initiatives and reviewed literature on teams in other contexts. From this, we developed an initial model that delineates important aspects of team setup, and suggests how this is ultimately linked to team outcomes. In this talk, we show our model and highlight some interesting variations in team setup, such as whether project leaders encourage administrators to directly participate on teams, recruit instructors because they teach specific courses, and create fixed boundaries for team membership. We use existing literature to hypothesize about what the underlying causes of these differences might be and consider implications for project leaders.
      • Team-Based Instructional Change: Participants’ Perspectives

      • CG02
      • Sun 01/13, 5:40PM - 5:50PM
      • by Diana Sachmpazidi Alice Olmstead, Charles Henderson, Andrea Beach

      • Type: Contributed
      • Team-based instructional change efforts are becoming a widely used strategy for improving undergraduate STEM education. However, current literature on this topic is limited. Our goal is to empirically investigate how these teams are set up, work together, and generate positive outcomes. In this talk, we focus on characterizing teamwork processes and understanding the links between inputs, mediators, and outcomes. Data presented represents three different types of teams: interdisciplinary teams, teams initiated within single departments, and teams that are part of cross-campus, multi-discipline initiatives. Individual interviews with team members allow us to explore team members’ perspectives on, for example, how their team processes were established, the nature of their collaboration, and how conflicts that emerged during their work were resolved. In the talk, we will connect these results to prior results based on interviews with project leaders.
      • Epistemological Framing and Mechanistic Reasoning During Collaborative LA Preparation Sessions

      • CG03
      • Sun 01/13, 5:50PM - 6:00PM
      • by Austin McCauley Shahrzad Hesaaraki, Jessica Conn, Eleanor Close

      • Type: Contributed
      • The physics department at Texas State University has implemented a Learning Assistant (LA) program with reform-based instructional changes in our introductory course sequences. The LA program structure at TXST is informed by the theory of communities of practice. We are interested in how participation in the program influences LAs’ reasoning and comprehension of physics concepts. Russ et. al. [1] developed a framework to identify students’ mechanistic reasoning, including “chaining.” Scherr and Hammer created a theoretical framework to identify student behavior and epistemological framing during collaborative learning activities [2]. We utilize Scherr and Hammer’s framework to identify episodes of group engagement in video recordings from weekly preparation meetings, and Russ’ framework to analyze LAs’ use of higher-level mechanistic reasoning during these episodes. We will describe evidence of collaborative chaining during group engagement episodes, and describe its impact both on the group and in individual students.
      • Understanding the benefits of the Learning Assistant Program Weekly Preparation Session

      • CG04
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:10PM
      • by Mel Sabella Felicia Davenport, Fidel Amezcua, Andrea Van Duzor

      • Type: Contributed
      • The Learning Assistant (LA) Model involves undergraduate students as peer support in STEM classrooms. LAs meet weekly with the instructors, in whose classes they serve, and these weekly meetings provide multiple benefits for the students in LA supported classes, the LAs, and the instructors. Developing a better understanding of these sessions can aid LA Programs in establishing different norms and expectations in the partnerships between LAs and instructors. The Preparation Session Observation Protocol (PSOT) developed by CSU LAs can help support LAs and instructors in reflecting on their weekly interactions and can provide a guide for including more avenues of collaboration. Involvement in collaborative relationships can help LAs feel like valued members, rather than guests, in learning and teaching communities. We present versions of PSOT for researchers and practitioners and draw on the framework of “rightful presence” (Calabrese-Barton & Tan, 2017), used to understand equity-oriented teaching, as a useful lens in analyzing partnerships in the LA Model.
      • Applied Physics Workshops for Teacher-Student Teams

      • CG05
      • Sun 01/13, 6:10PM - 6:20PM
      • by Matthew Perkins Coppola Mark Masters

      • Type: Contributed
      • In June 2018, our university hosted an Applied Physics Workshop for teams of high school teachers and students. Teams worked together to construct multiple apparatus and constructed lesson plans centered on integrating these into the high school curriculum. Apparatus included model demonstrations of NMR and atomic force microscopes, as well as functioning spectroscopes, interferometers, and acoustic levitators. A qualitative research study conducted by Dr. Perkins Coppola investigated the dynamic interaction of high school teachers and students within the workshop. Field notes, interviews, and pre/post testing provided rich insights into how teachers and students interacting with each other during a professional development activity might encourage integration of demonstrations into the teaching curriculum and offer insights as to how to do so.
      • Understanding the Structures and Practices of Informal Physics Programs

      • CG06
      • Sun 01/13, 6:20PM - 6:30PM
      • by Kathleen Hinko Claudia Fracchiolla, Dena Izadi

      • Type: Contributed
      • Many physicists and physics graduate and undergraduate students participate in informal physics education programs that have a goal of engaging youth and public audiences. Often these informal and outreach programs are supported with financial, material,and personnel resources by physics departments, and also may be connected to other campus groups. Thus, to consider how informal physics programs should be best sustained, it is important to understand the structures and practices both within informal physics programs themselves and at the departmental and university levels. Here we report on our initial investigations of several informal physics programs of varying types using a lens of a non-profit organization framework. By using this lens to analyze in depth interviews with program facilitators, we seek to determine the practices and structures that most influence the ’success’ of these programs.
  • PhysTEC in 50 States

      • PhysTEC: Building a Solution to the National Physics Teacher Shortage

      • DF01
      • Mon 01/14, 11:00AM - 11:30AM
      • by Monica Plisch
      • Type: Invited
      • There is a severe national shortage of qualified high school physics teachers in the U.S. Since 2001, the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) project has been working to engage physics departments in establishing the infrastructure needed to address the national physics teacher shortage. The project has developed model teacher preparation programs, disseminated information on effective practices, and advocated for teacher preparation within the physics community. PhysTEC Supported Sites have more than doubled their production of highly qualified physics teachers; they have also demonstrated considerable success in sustaining their programs beyond the funding period. The project has established a national coalition of more than 300 Member Institutions located in all 50 states, which collectively educate over half of the nation’s highly qualified physics teachers. PhysTEC is a project of the American Physical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, with support from the National Science Foundation (#1707990).
      • PhysTEC Comprehensive Site at Rowan University - What Worked

      • DF02
      • Mon 01/14, 11:30AM - 11:40AM
      • by Karen Magee-Sauer Trevor Smith, Patrick Chestnut, Phillip La Porta, David Klassen

      • Type: Contributed
      • Rowan University was selected as a PhysTEC Comprehensive site 2015 – 2018. During this period Rowan started an LA program and Rowan Area Physics Teacher (RAPT) network, established undergraduate research opportunities in PER, and created a strong voice in the department to promote high school physics teaching as a career path. In this talk, we will present the successes and challenges during our funding period as well as present how we plan to sustain all programs now that our funding period is completed. Rowan University is a public institution in Glassboro, NJ, with 18,500 students and 160+ physics majors and is a member of the 5+ club for graduating more than five certified high school physics teachers per year.
      • PhysTEC’s Contribution to Physics and Science Education at Boston University

      • DF03
      • Mon 01/14, 11:40AM - 11:50AM
      • by Andrew Duffy Peter Garik, Mark Greenman, Nicholas Gross, Manher Jariwala

      • Type: Contributed
      • Starting with the Boston University (BU) Department of Physics joining PhysTEC, significant changes have occurred at BU in physics education, science education generally, and the preparation of science teachers. PhysTEC introduced us to the Learning Assistant program. BU now has 20+ physics LAs each semester and over 125 LAs across all science courses, transforming science education at BU. In 2011, BU received a comprehensive PhysTEC award, enabling us to fund a Physics Teacher in Residence (TIR). The TIR and LA Program strengthened our grant applications for Robert Noyce NSF awards. Two successful Noyce grants have resulted in an increase in the number of physics teachers BU prepares, and greater attention in their preparation for high-need schools. The TIR also acted for social justice with a NSF award (Project Accelerate), a high school – university partnership to bring AP Physics 1 to students whose schools do not offer it.
      • PhysTEC Growing UTeach in West Virginia

      • DF04
      • Mon 01/14, 11:50AM - 12:00PM
      • by John Stewart Gay Stewart

      • Type: Contributed
      • Ongoing PhysTEC support for physics teacher preparation at West Virginia University provides a model of how the PhysTEC program can support the implementation of broader initiatives in STEM teacher preparation. These broader initiatives and the partnerships they foster will feed back into the physics program providing badly needed physics teachers for West Virginia. PhysTEC has supported a Teacher-in-Residence (TIR) who has transitioned to the role of a master teacher in the WVUteach program. The TIR was instrumental in developing recruiting efforts and improving introductory physics labs. As a master teacher, he supports a more rapid implementation of the full WVUteach program.
      • PhysTEC: Kicking off Physics Teacher Preparation at University of Arkansas*

      • DF05
      • Mon 01/14, 12:00PM - 12:10PM
      • by Gay Stewart John Stewart

      • Type: Contributed
      • University of Arkansas, Fayetteville was one of the six primary program institutions in this new thing called PhysTEC in 2001 (growing out of NSF grant 0075528, funded by 0108787). We had three core beliefs: 1. If there is a reason teachers should teach like that, why aren’t we? 2. You never know who is going to be a future teacher. 3. In better-serving all students, a department also benefits. UA has seen a drastic change in number of majors, the number of students active in research and the number of graduates pursuing graduate work while also increasing the number of majors who decide to teach. In this talk we will discuss some of the highlights of the program that we believe contributed to its success.
      • Multiple Representations and NGSS-based Curriculum Design for In-service Physics Teachers

      • DF06
      • Mon 01/14, 12:10PM - 12:20PM
      • by Christopher Moore
      • Type: Contributed
      • We have adapted PhysTEC learning modules on multiple representations and curriculum design into an online graduate course for in-service physics teachers. In-service teachers in the Omaha metro area learned how to use proven tools and strategies to adapt/develop standards-aligned curriculum on topics in motion, force, and energy. Specifically, participants completed modules initially developed by the Physics Education Research Group at Rutgers University, and then adapted existing NASA curriculum materials for use within Nebraska Career and College Ready Science Standards (NCCRSS). This resulted in the adaptation of NASA materials to Nebraska standards, generating classroom-ready NASA-based materials for Nebraska teachers, and the training of new physics teacher-leaders to help their districts prepare for NCCRSS implementation. Participant work was assessed using the Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) rubric to assess adapted materials and we report on changes in participant beliefs using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS-Phys).
  • Physics Majors: High School to Doctorate

      • Deficiencies and Amendments in Newton's Laws of Motion

      • BI01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 1:40PM
      • by Amritpal Nafria
      • Type: Contributed
      • Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that laid the foundation for classical mechanics. They describe the relationship between a body and the forces acting upon it, and its motion in response to those forces. Newton's first law states that every object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force. The second law states that the rate of change of momentum of a body is directly proportional to the force applied and the third law states that for every action (force) in nature there is an equal and opposite reaction. This paper shows ‘F=ma’ is not a universal equation, as the role of gravity is still missing in the given convention. Moreover, ‘F=mga’ is a formula of Inertia (I=wa), i.e. Newton’s first law of motion. Formula of force is ‘F=w(v–u) or ‘F=wv’. It is also explained that how to calculate net force numerically when it is applied on wall/stationary objects and on objects moving with constant velocity. In third law, action and reaction are not always equal. It is not explained properly what action and reaction exactly are and under what circumstances or conditions ‘action and reaction are equal and vice versa’. This paper explains that action and reaction act simultaneously, both are always opposite but equal when both stay stationary. In this paper it is explained, how third law is wrongly interpreted in examples.
      • Beyond the FCI – Assessing Conceptual Learning of Physics Majors

      • BI02
      • Sun 01/13, 1:40PM - 1:50PM
      • by Ian Bearden Inkeri Kontro

      • Type: Contributed
      • The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is one of the most widely used assessments for quantifying the conceptual learning of students of introductory physics. However, it contains many problematic items, including questions with very low or high difficulty, high false positive rates, or large gender differences. In addition, students who have studied physics more extensively at the secondary level tend to saturate the assessment already when entering the university. For example, the average pre-test score of physics students from the University of Helsinki, Finland, were 22.9 (76.4%), with 27% of students achieving >90% (N = 195). For Niels Bohr Institutet in Denmark, the corresponding numbers are 19.7 (65.7%) and 15% (N = 779). In its current form, the FCI is not a good instrument for assessing the conceptual learning for these students. In this talk, we discuss FCI results from NBI and UH and the ways the FCI might be extended to make it usable in high-achieving physics populations.
      • Incorporating a Physics Engagement Assignment into First-Year Physics

      • BI03
      • Sun 01/13, 1:50PM - 2:00PM
      • by Kristen Burson
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics students enter college with different levels of understanding about the availability and importance of out-of-class learning opportunities and academic support resources. In order to incentivize participation in out-of-class activities that help students thrive in their study of physics, a ‘physics engagement’ assignment was introduced to the first-semester introductory physics course at Hamilton College. The assignment includes mentoring, connecting with the physics department, and utilizing academic support resources. In this talk, I will discuss the implementation and outcomes of this assignment from two-years of implementation based on student submitted responses and personal observations. Since implementation, there has been a significant increase in the use of drop-in tutoring at the quantitative and symbolic reasoning center. We have also seen increased attendance among first-year students at the physics colloquia series (sustained in subsequent semesters). Lessons learned from the pilot year of the assignment will be discussed.
      • Integration of AP and Dual Enrollment Courses plus Project Based Learning

      • BI04
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:10PM
      • by Fatih Gozuacik
      • Type: Contributed
      • Small campuses always aim to increase AP and dual credit course offerings. However, due to the student count, mostly advanced courses face closures. In that case, school ends up losing the high achievers. Therefore, we were in need of finding a way to keep our AP programs alive. As a solution, presenter, who have been teaching AP Physics course and college counselor of the campus, started offering integrated AP and dual courses. A great success was harvested! College credit earning rate increased by 400%. Year by year data tables and graphs will be projected to distinguish the effectiveness of the plan. Students who are willing to register to take the AP exam, do so; whereas local students prefer just receiving their college credit through dual physics course. Such plan is applicable for most of the AP and matching dual credit courses. Project Based Learning (PBL) in AP classes for enhancing the class and well designed STEMSOS PBL program will be introduced.
      • Project BoxSand: What are My Students Doing When I'm Not Looking?

      • BI05
      • Sun 01/13, 2:10PM - 2:20PM
      • by Kenneth Walsh
      • Type: Contributed
      • Ever wondered what your students are studying outside of class and if it correlates to better learning outcomes? Project BoxSand started with the simple question, "Will my students prepare for a flipped class by watching pre-lecture videos?” The project has since expanded into providing a completely re-envisioned digital replacement for the textbook, packed with all the best open resources from around the web and built in-house, including text, videos, simulations, and more. Students' engagement with resources is tracked on a click-by-click basis on the boxsand.org site, providing big data for learning analytics research. I'll present initial findings on nearly 4 million student clicks on resources and homework collected over the past 2 years. I'll discuss what online study habits correlate with performance in the class. For example, are there good and bad cramming behaviors? Come learn about our educational data mining study.
      • Development of Teaching Learning Materials Using Excel: About Absolute Age of Rock

      • BI06
      • Sun 01/13, 2:20PM - 2:30PM
      • by Minkyoung Kim Soomeen Wee

      • Type: Contributed
      • In this study, the purpose is to develop teaching materials that can cultivate computing thinking skills in relation to the absolute age section of rock at the high school earth science level. Software education for human resource development necessary for future intelligence information society is emphasized, and in 2015 revised curriculum in Korea, functions related to mathematical thought and computer use have been added to the content system of science subjects. Therefore, in this study, we are presenting teaching learning materials to implement the half-life of radioactive isotope on clock and graph using an Excel program. By doing this, we will learn the half-life of radioactive isotope and the concept of age measurement of rock, and expect the effect that we can improve computing thinking power.
      • Could Less be More in the Introductory Kinematics Lab?

      • BI07
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 2:40PM
      • by Roland Woodward
      • Type: Contributed
      • For years, I have used a popular commercial computer interface in my mechanics labs, which reports all major kinematic quantities automatically. After follow-up questions indicated that my students did not understand the relationships among displacement,velocity, acceleration, and time--not to mention how they were actually being measured or computed--I developed a minimalist interface that reports the times (and only the times) at which, e.g., a photogate beam is interrupted. I felt that requiring the students to figure out for themselves how to determine displacement etc. would enhance student learning. The interface itself has been described in previous talks [1]; in this talk, I present preliminary results from a systematic comparison of the effect on student learning of this minimalist approach, compared to the conventional method and equipment, for one classic mechanics lab.
      • Unstructured Play - What Happens When You Do Nothing At All

      • BI08
      • Sun 01/13, 2:40PM - 2:50PM
      • by Carolyn Martsberger Mackay Salley

      • Type: Contributed
      • Wofford College has a unique January, or “Interim”, where students only take one class. Students can take courses in a wide range of offerings such as the Art and Science of Craft Brewing, Welding, 3-D printing, or Breakdancing, or they can design their own interim. As a result, students take ownership of their education, get a large chunk of unscheduled time, and get to investigate what they would do if they could do anything. Often Interim allows students to try new things that they might not yet know interests them. The results of Interim can be astounding for some students. As one students puts it, Interim is “one of the most terrifying and rewarding things she has conquered in her time at Wofford.” This talk will share how allowing students to step out of the traditional classroom and “play” can be a fruitful academic exercise.
      • Science 100: Using Energy, Expose the Students to Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space, Physics

      • BI09
      • Sun 01/13, 2:50PM - 3:00PM
      • by Donald Franklin
      • Type: Contributed
      • Many students attend schools that do not have physics, or they do not take physics for fear it will lower their GPA. Science 100 allows the school to expose the students to all the major sciences and show how they are interrelated. Using Energy as the major theme, any Science teacher can teach the class, some may need a workshop to prepare.
      • How Did we Integrate Engineering Tools and Projects into Physics Curriculum?

      • BI10
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:10PM
      • by Levent Sakar
      • Type: Contributed
      • It has been seven years that we are assigning year-long projects to the students in physics classes. The students started with simple project ideas and later on, they came with more advanced projects like; 1- 3D Prosthetics Hand/Finger 2- Solar Tech & Research projects (Solar Cars) 3- Rocketry Projects 4- Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV); drones and underwater robotics 5- Near the Space Projects (Weather Balloon) 6- Eco Car Design 7- Aquaponics 8- Variety of RasperryPi and Arduino projects I would like to present where the teachers can follow up on students' work and mention the "share and shine" approach to promote these projects to create a STEM-focused school culture.
      • Problem-Solving Competitions and the U.S. Physics Team

      • BI11
      • Sun 01/13, 3:10PM - 3:20PM
      • by Mark Eichenlaub
      • Type: Contributed
      • The U.S. Physics team provides opportunities for students who want to explore physics problem-solving and teachers looking for extra-curricular physics opportunities. Each year, the U.S. Physics team runs the F=ma exam, then the U.S. Physics Olympiad exam. Approximately 20 students from across the country qualify to join the U.S. Physics team for a 10-day training camp involving extensive theoretical and experimental problem-solving, guest lectures and lab tours from physicists, and the opportunity to participate in public outreach. Five students continue to the International Physics Olympiad and participate in a week-long program including theory and experiment exams, touring local destinations, and meeting talented young students from around the world. This talk will share the goals and methods of the U.S. Physics team program, give example problems, and show how high school teachers and students can begin participating.
      • Formula Recollection Made Simple with Acronyms

      • BI12
      • Sun 01/13, 3:20PM - 3:30PM
      • by Shannon Schunicht
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physic's formula recollection is overwhelming to students without such aspirations. Simple acronyms, like FOIL (First, Outside, Inside, & Last) for quadratic equations, and My Dear Aunt Sally [Multiply, Divide, Addition, then Subtraction], are always remembered from grade school. Difficult formulas apparent in college PHY 201 & 202 courses usually thwart further pursuit thereof. This was particularly apparent when taking PHY 201 & 202 following a severe head injury (19 days unconsciousness) => without a Short term memory! For this reason, a mnemonic technique [Vowels: Mathematical Operations] was devised, and recognized by Marquis’ WORLD Who’s Who Lifetime achievement amongst significant others. Examples include an acronym; exCePT i buiLD rabbiTS 4 caTS oN 2 HaTS, for The Quadratic Equation. Everyone remembers Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel). **Note how ADDITIONAL CONSONANTS insertion enhance intelligibility. This mnemonic technique's Western languages application is unfounded, whereas its Eastern Character's application has yet to be explored? Regardless, its possibilities remain limitless as ?X => 0
  • Physics Outreach for Underserved Populations

      • How to Speak to People Your Own Age

      • BF01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Thomas Greenslade, Jr.
      • Type: Invited
      • In the popular usage, education seems to be for young adults. In most situations AAPT members teach students in the 14 to 22 age range. But there is an opportunity to speak to those who are more mature – who are our own ages. Historical societies, genealogical societies, alumni groups and library lecture series are all venues where we can talk about science to those with considerable life experience. I will talk about my own experiences with these groups of people, and, in doing so, will speak with people who are almost my age.
      • Including Students with Physical Disabilities into Physics Programs

      • BF02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Steven Sahyun
      • Type: Invited
      • Providing instruction to students with physical challenges can seem like a burdensome task. However, by planning course material with universal design principles in mind, and by taking advantage of available resources, it is often possible to provide fairly simple modifications to existing physics course material to create classroom or laboratory environments that, regardless of disability provides enhanced learning for all students. This talk will focus on the need for accommodation practices in the physics classroom and laboratory, several types of instructional challenges related to students with disabilities, finding resources to help make courses universally accessible and provide some examples for accommodating student learning needs. Specific examples will include student inclusion in research and field trip experiences, methods for providing material such as large print, tactile displays, electronic formats that are useful for text to speech and multimodal (tactile, auditory and visual) presentation methods.
      • Experiences with the New York School for the Deaf

      • BF03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 2:40PM
      • by Drake Brewster*
      • Type: Contributed
      • STEM outreach programs often overlook special needs schools and programs during planning efforts. During the summer of 2018, STEM outreach program for the Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering invited the New York School for the Deaf to our facility for an interactive STEM demonstration. Despite a learning curve for our presenters, the event was a success and led to several important discoveries in our after action report. We will share these findings during our presentation.
      • Physics Outreach to Spanish Town and Linstead in Jamaica

      • BF04
      • Sun 01/13, 2:40PM - 2:50PM
      • by Michael Ponnambalam
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics Outreach was started by this author in Jamaica in 2006 at the University of the West Indies, catering to students at all levels and to the general public. It has been extremely successful, and has played a key role in increasing the number of students doing introductory physics. Some of us visited a few elementary schools for this outreach, while some came to the university on a Science Field Trip, arranged by us. Due to various reasons, the elementary school students in Spanish Town and Linstead have missed both of these since 2006. To make up for this, in April 2018, the author conducted the Interactive Show on 'Science Is Fun' to around 800 students in Spanish Town and Linstead. The results, as seen from their feedback, will be presented in this talk.
      • Synergies Among Broader Impact, Service Learning and Outreach

      • BF05
      • Sun 01/13, 2:50PM - 3:00PM
      • by David Sederberg
      • Type: Contributed
      • We describe the inspiration, unique approach, and rationale behind three successful Physics and Astronomy Outreach programs at Purdue University. Sidewalk Science, engages parents, grandparents and high school students, in interactive exhibits for elementary grades in a traveling format. Physics Inside Out, a five-day summer camp, opens the doors for middle school students to current research topics and fundamental concepts of physics and astronomy, and engages faculty with rewarding opportunities for broader impact. Saturday Morning Astrophysics, a monthly on-campus workshop, engages grade 7-12 students in timely topics, such as dark matter, gravitational waves, and exoplanets, as well as concepts related to posing and answering questions pondered throughout millennia of human curiosity. We will describe the role of faculty engagement and undergraduate service learning that forms the framework and contributes to the success of these outreach programs, and the challenges of recruiting underserved communities.
      • University Physics Service Learning in an Alternative Learning Classroom

      • BF06
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:10PM
      • by Shannon Clardy
      • Type: Contributed
      • While the pedagogy of service learning is not widely employed in physics, service learning in an alternative classroom environment is seen even less frequently. Alternative classroom environments (ACEs) serve students who do not perform well in a traditional classroom setting, often with a disproportionate number of minority students. ACE are an important form of intervention used to encourage academic, social, and emotional success for K-12 students. There are a number of challenges to creating service learning courses that address this population; however, the benefits are immense. With both challenges and benefits considered, an implementation of service learning pedagogy in calculus-based physics was developed at Henderson State University, with student knowledge gains compared to University Physics without the service learning element.
      • Preliminary Analysis of Informal Quantum Science Education in Underserved Communities

      • BF07
      • Sun 01/13, 3:10PM - 3:20PM
      • by Quinn Manning Jeremy Manning

      • Type: Contributed
      • Recent work demonstrates certain challenges that arise when engaging high school students in underserved communities with laboratory work and related project-based pedagogy. We suggest that a new approach to the traditional physics curriculum be undertaken by targeting those areas of physics which naturally appeal to and inspire students. Given the extensive literature written on the importance of, and demand for, a Quantum Information Science (QIS) workforce in the United States, it is proposed that the QIS field itself could provide these more appealing and inspiring learning experiences to students. We offer preliminary data on the design of an informal quantum science education platform called Project QUERB, which enables students to remotely conduct experiments through an online interface, and on the use and benefits of the platform, including functionality to evaluate the pedagogical efficacy of different epistemological approaches to QIS.
      • Physics Classes as Corporate Training

      • BF08
      • Sun 01/13, 3:20PM - 3:30PM
      • by Anya Rasmussen
      • Type: Contributed
      • Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL), an international employee-owned company headquartered in Pullman, WA, designs and manufactures digital devices used to monitor and protect the power system. SEL recently initiated a STEM education program gearedtowards manufacturing employees. This unique program aims to enrich and develop employee-owners through STEM education. Employees are invited to step away from their normal roles and participate in a weeklong, workshop-style science, engineering, or mathematics class. Currently, employees elect to take an introductory physics or introductory statistics class. We have plans to expand the curriculum to 15 courses over the next two years. In this presentation, we describe the physics course design, discuss the challenges and advantages of teaching and learning physics in this unusual setting, and report student learning gains on the Force Concept Inventory.
  • Physics Teacher Preparation in Different Countries throughout the World

      • An Overview of Physics Teacher Preparation in Ireland

      • GD01
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 9:00AM
      • by Leanne Doughty
      • Type: Invited
      • Secondary education in Ireland consists of a three-year Junior Cycle and a two-year Senior Cycle. Physics teachers are responsible for teaching a Senior Cycle physics course (optional for students at most schools) and typically an integrated science course for Junior Cycle (mandatory for students at most schools). Revisions to the national syllabi for both these courses have placed an emphasis on student inquiry and investigation. There are two main pathways to becoming a physics teacher through multiple institutions. One is through a 4- or 5-year concurrent qualification which combines the study of physics with teacher education courses, methods courses, and school placement. The other is through consecutive qualifications, obtaining a physics degree followed by a Professional Masters of Education. This talk will discuss and compare the different pathways and the unique challenges faced for physics teachers within the Irish secondary school system.
      • Developing and Preparation Physics Teachers in the United States

      • GD02
      • Tue 01/15, 9:00AM - 9:30AM
      • by Robert Zisk Eugenia Etkina

      • Type: Invited
      • Physics teacher preparation in the United States is evolving in response to a national shortage of qualified physics teachers. In this talk, I will review the recent research on physics teacher preparation programs in the United States, which has identified the areas of need within physics teacher preparation and highlighted the characteristics and practices of model teacher preparation programs. I will then describe the physics teacher preparation program at Rutgers University, a program that is consistently one of the top producers of physics teachers in the United States, and focuses on the development of pre-service teachers’ content knowledge for teaching physics through repeated and continuous immersion in courses and teaching experiences that are centered on the same philosophy of learning and teaching physics.
      • Physics Teacher Preparation in India - An Overview

      • GD03
      • Tue 01/15, 9:30AM - 10:00AM
      • by Mashood KK
      • Type: Invited
      • The Indian education system broadly follows the 10+2+3 pattern. Physics is taught as a separate subject from grade 11 onwards. Minimum qualifications to teach physics in grades 11 and 12 are a masters degree in physics along with a bachelors degree in education (BEd). The latter is a mandatory 2 year professional degree. In-service teacher training at school level (10 + 2), is primarily carried out by a network of federal and state funded institutions. Minimum qualifications to teach undergraduate physics in colleges/universities are a masters degree along with passing a national eligibility test which mainly focuses on problem solving. In-service teacher training at undergraduate level happens mainly in the form of refresher courses, workshops etc., in core topics in physics. This paper, in addition to providing an overview of physics teacher preparation in India, will also discuss insights from physics education research we carried out in this regard.
  • Physics at Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs): Challenges and Opportunities

      • Physics Programs at HSIs: A Report to the Community

      • CC01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 6:00PM
      • by Juan Burciaga
      • Type: Invited
      • AAPT and NSHP hosted a Conference on Enhancing Undergraduate Physics Programs at Hispanic Serving Institutions (EUPP-HSIs) at the Winter 2018 meeting in San Diego. The conference was used as a way to bring together physics faculty from representative HSIs to discuss the challenges and opportunities of physics education at HSIs, to explore what resources exist to enhance physics programming at HSIs, what resources and programs need to be developed, and the role of professional societies in faculty development at HSIs. Indeed, the principle value of the conference may well have been the opportunity for physics faculty from diverse HSIs to come together to discuss their experiences and needs. The talk will focus on the conference design, summaries of discussions from the conference that articulated key criteria of both curricular and extra-curricular physics programs, and the suggested practices that can enhance the impact of these programs.
      • Physics at the University of the Incarnate Word (UIW)

      • CC02
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:30PM
      • by Rosa Cardenas
      • Type: Invited
      • The University of the Incarnate Word (UIW) is a Hispanic Serving institution (HSI) in San Antonio, TX, with 4300 undergraduates -- 51% are Latino or Hispanic, 59% are female, and 40% are first generation college students. With these demographics, a physics program at UIW could lead to a huge impact on the demographics of physics as a whole. But would a physics program at UIW attract enough students to succeed? Currently, Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism are taught as support courses for other majors. This semester I asked my physics students if they had considered physics as a career path. They responded, "what does a physicist do? Where do they work? How much are they paid?"
  • Physics on the Road

      • Physics on the Road

      • GH
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 10:00AM
      • by Steve Shropshire
      • Type: Topical
      • Join demonstration and outreach experts in a panel discussion on ongoing efforts to develop a “How-To” guide for physics on the road outreach.
  • Post-deadline Abstracts I

      • A Interesting Demo for Static Electrification—Wimshurst Machine

      • IA01
      • Tue 01/15, 3:00PM - 3:10PM
      • by Xiaoyu Niu
      • Type: Contributed
      • Generally, Wimshurst Machines are used to display static electricity phenomenon. Most learners are willing to attribute efficient electrification to friction. In fact, it is induction that enables Wimshurst Machine to produce an astonishing number of charges in an instant. In this paper, we present the process and theory of the electrification by induction and verify it both theoretically and experimentally. In addition, in order to explain the authentic mechanism of Wimshurst Machine, we design three funny experiments: 1) Opposite-Directed Rotating Experiment; 2) Same-Foils Experiment; 3) Angle of Brushes Experiment. Based on above experiments, the mechanism of efficient electrification could be explained into “Model of Exponential Explosion”. Finally, we contribute creatively the process of electrification to Circle System of Positive Feedback or Circle System of Negative Feedback, which could fairly interpret the phenomenon of efficient electrification.
      • Updates to the AP Physics 1 & Physics 2 Courses

      • IA02
      • Tue 01/15, 3:10PM - 3:20PM
      • by Tanya Sharpe Angela Jensvold, Mark Hossler

      • Type: Contributed
      • This session consists of three distinct segments: 1) The Course, 2) The Exam, and 3) New Resources. In both the course and exam segments, participants are provided opportunities to share best practices and learn of instructional strategies and approachesfor enhanced teaching and learning. Using the new curriculum frameworks, participants will model and practice scaffolding physics content and science practices as they integrate formative and summative assessments. At the end of each segment presenters and participants will engage in Q&A. Participants will learn of new resources for the AP Physics 1 and 2 courses available in August 2019. This includes the new online AP Classroom resources (item bank, personal project checks, unit guides, quiz and exam creator, AP Physics 1 Workbook, etc.). Presenters will provide an overview of each new resource as participants share how each could be used to effectively implement the curriculum frameworks.
      • Updates to the AP Physics C: Mechanics & Electricity and Magnetism Courses and Exams

      • IA03
      • Tue 01/15, 3:20PM - 3:30PM
      • by Tanya Sharpe Ricardo Markland

      • Type: Contributed
      • This session consists of three distinct segments: 1) The Course, 2) The Exam, and 3) New Resources. In both the course and exam segments, participants are provided opportunities to share best practices and learn of instructional strategies and approachesfor enhanced teaching and learning. Using the new curriculum frameworks, participants will model and practice scaffolding physics content and science practices as they integrate formative and summative assessments. Participants also will learn of new resources and share activities and ideas for how to incorporate them instructionally. At the end of each segment presenters and participants will engage in Q&A.
      • Investigation on Chinese Teachers' Categorization of Kinematics and Mechanics Problems

      • IA04
      • Tue 01/15, 3:30PM - 3:40PM
      • by Elva Chen
      • Type: Contributed
      • Novices and experts choose different strategies to categorize the physics problems, which reflects their different expertise in problem solving. Since the students’ categorization is affected by their teachers, we conducted a study to investigate the physics teachers’ method of categorization. Over 60 Chinese teachers from different schools were involved in our study. In general, the teachers can categorize problems of kinematics and mechanics into suitable categories based on the underlying principles.
      • Research on Chinese College Students’ Learning Attitudes to Physics Experiments

      • IA05
      • Tue 01/15, 3:40PM - 3:50PM
      • by Daisy Chen
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics experiments, as the core section of the physics education, have already become the main contents of the higher education. And students’ attitudes to physics experiments play a significant role in physics teaching and learning. So this research focuses on the learning attitudes of Chinese college students towards physics experiments. The research objects are college students who major in physics in East China Normal University in Shanghai, China. And the measurement tool is the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). The original E-CLASS was translated into Mandarin through a rigorous process. We found that students’ learning attitudes to physics experiments were ordinary in general and they varied from different grades and genders.
      • Research on Chinese College Students’ Learning Attitudes to Physics Experiments

      • IA06
      • Tue 01/15, 3:50PM - 4:00PM
      • by Yunlin Chen
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics experiments, as the core section of the physics education, have already become the main contents of the higher education. And students’ attitudes to physics experiments play a significant role in physics teaching and learning. So this research focuses on the learning attitudes of Chinese college students towards physics experiments. The research objects are college students who major in physics in East China Normal University in Shanghai, China. And the measurement tool is the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). The original E-CLASS was translated into Mandarin through a rigorous process. We found that students’ learning attitudes to physics experiments were ordinary in general and they varied from different grades and genders.
      • The Research on Students’ Preconceptions about Rigid Body Rotation

      • IA07
      • Tue 01/15, 4:00PM - 4:10PM
      • by Candice Bian
      • Type: Contributed
      • The study is about the students’ preconceptions in the process of learning the concepts of rigid body rotation. The sample of the study consists of 30 students who had not learned the concepts of rigid body rotation at the east of china normal university. we deeply understand the students' thinking about the problem of rigid body rotation through the Think-aloud interviews, and discover the students’ preconceptions in the process of learning the concepts of rigid body rotation. We find that student always think mass will affect the rolling motion. They often cannot know whether objects can be regarded as the point or not.
      • A Low Cost XRF Lab For Undergraduate And High School Students

      • IA08
      • Tue 01/15, 4:10PM - 4:20PM
      • by Daniel Marble Chris Marble, Kassie Marble, Brian Salge

      • Type: Contributed
      • A lab on X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) in an undergraduate physics curriculum can be extremely beneficial. The lab reinforces the physics (emission of specific energy photons from a bound system) concepts from optical and gamma ray spectroscopy labs. Furthermore, the lab provides the students with an introduction to a powerful analytical technique that can non-destructively analyze samples from soils to semiconductors. XRF is usually performed using either high activity sources requiring a radiation materials license combined with an expensive x-ray detector or using a dedicated XRF system constructed using an x-ray machine. Since most smaller undergraduate institutions lack these expensive resources, XRF labs are often not performed. This talk will show how to perform an XRF lab without these expensive resources using just an exempt gamma source, a small NaI detector based counting system already available at many of these institutions and a judicious choice of unknown samples. A discussion of our use of the lab in our high school summer physics camp will also be presented.
      • Anatomy of a Question: lessons on collaboration from making exams

      • IA09
      • Tue 01/15, 4:20PM - 4:30PM
      • by Jared Stenson
      • Type: Contributed
      • On a recent exam to a calculus-based introductory physics class for pre-med students 3 faculty agreed to give a rather standard question. Afterwards they dissected it to find that there is much going on in the question, in their collaboration, and in how they view the purpose of their teaching. This is their story.
  • Post-deadline Abstracts II

      • Designing a Dark Matter Particle Detector

      • IB01
      • Tue 01/15, 3:00PM - 3:10PM
      • by Lionel Hewett
      • Type: Contributed
      • A few years, ago the decay of dark matter was apparently observed to occur in the halos of several distant galaxies. More recently, the fluorescence of dark matter was apparently observed in the vicinity of at least one active galactic nucleus. By duplicating these conditions in the laboratory one can hope to observe individual dark matter particles and confirm some of their properties as predicted by various theoretical models. This talk presents several dark matter particle detector designs (based upon one or more of the conditions where dark matter apparently has already been detected in deep space) and discusses what we could reasonably expect to observe by using each of these designs.
      • Gram It! Using Images and Video Clips to Engage Students

      • IB02
      • Tue 01/15, 3:10PM - 3:20PM
      • by Walter Thompson
      • Type: Contributed
      • Most algebra-based physics students are in the course for one reason--it is a requirement for their degree plan. That means that as instructors we have an obligation to create a sense of excitement for the subject matter. One way to do this is by deploying the same social media tools that students already use for communication, information gathering, and entertainment. I will present examples of how you can use images and short video clips from Vine, Instagram, and YouTube to increase student engagement and demonstrate how physics applies to almost everything around us.
      • Certification or Undergraduate Major: A Search for Efficacious Physics Teacher

      • IB03
      • Tue 01/15, 3:20PM - 3:30PM
      • by Philomena Agu
      • Type: Contributed
      • Texas verifies subject content knowledge of science teachers in public schools by certification examination. The physics teachers with undergraduate degree major in most academic fields obtain certification by either subject-specific or composite sciencetest which contains 20 percent physics contents. The composite teachers may have little academic preparation in physics. Their sense of efficacy may be impacted. Studies have used personal efficacy and outcome expectancy subscales in Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI) to measure teacher effectiveness. Few scales exist specifically for physics teachers. Hence, STEBI was adapted. This study assessed the psychometric properties of modified STEBI using data from 510 in-service physics teachers. The validity was examined using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), and the reliability established with Cronbach’s alpha. The PCA supported the validity. The subscales were reliable; alpha was .84 and .75. STEBI could be adapted to study efficacy beliefs of physics teachers.
      • Teaching the Next Gen PET Curriculum at a Small Liberal Arts College.

      • IB04
      • Tue 01/15, 3:30PM - 3:40PM
      • by Deepshikha Shukla
      • Type: Contributed
      • I will talk about the implementation of the Next Gen PET curriculum at Rockford University, a small Liberal Arts college in Northern Illinois. The class was taught studio-style with only laboratory credits and with an integrated community-based learning component. I will present feedback from students and colleagues from the Education department and discuss plans to further improve the delivery of the course.
  • Pre High School

      • Finding Gifted Underachievers with Spatial Ability in Elementary Science Field

      • CI01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 5:40PM
      • by Yeon Su Jung* Jung Bog Kim

      • Type: Contributed
      • Spatial ability is an important element in the development of science and learning science. Because instructional strategies and assessment methods are based on verbal skills, gifted students with high spatial ability and low verbal ability tend to underachieve in the school. This study aims to explore the possibility to find underachieved gifted students with high spatial ability and low verbal ability. The participants are 5th grade students in elementary school. Their science academic achievement and understanding about concept of light propagation were analyzed by their spatial ability and verbal ability. This study shows the risk that nominating gifted students using science academic achievement can make the gifted student with high spatial ability and low verbal ability to underachieve. And it shows the possibility that using nonverbal test can find the student with high spatial ability and low verbal ability.
      • Where do Students Get their Ideas about What Physics Is?

      • CI02
      • Sun 01/13, 5:40PM - 5:50PM
      • by AJ Richards Cynthia Reynolds

      • Type: Contributed
      • In a previous study investigating middle- and high-school students' attitudes towards physics, we found that most students had strong feelings (often negative) about physics, yet many of them indicated that they had never formally taken any physics courses. This made us curious about how these students developed notions about what physics is and what a physicist does. Since it appears students arrive at the secondary level with these ideas already formed, we have chosen to examine 5th- and 6th-graders' attitudes about physics. In this talk, we will present preliminary findings from this research and speculate on possible explanations and implications.
      • Bauder Fund Endowment Helps Pre-HS Teachers

      • CI03
      • Sun 01/13, 5:50PM - 6:00PM
      • by Ann Robinson Sharon Kirby

      • Type: Contributed
      • The Bauder Fund Endowment enabled the University of West Georgia to host a workshop to improve the teaching and learning of kinematics for teachers in grades 3-8. Six teachers attended a workshop for 10 hours of instruction. Two PTRA leaders, Ann Robinson, Sharon Kirby, and David Todd were the instructors. The project focused on operational teaching pedagogy to keep participants involved. The topic of kinematics contained content driven activities as well as engineering, literature, and technology lessons. The participants were provided with lesson plans and “make and take” materials to take back to their schools to share with their students and peers. All activities were correlated with the Georgia Science Standards.
      • Comparison of Creativity Evaluation Among Four Groups about Science-Art Converged Products

      • CI04
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:10PM
      • by Arla Go Jiwon Lee

      • Type: Contributed
      •  As a result of various convergence education, students' converged products are being created, but these products are rarely evaluated and the research is also insignificant. Especially, in case of converged products, which are different from general products, it is a question to evaluate by a specialist in one area in relation to the domain general viewpoint or domain specific viewpoints of creativity. Therefore, this study uses the consensual assessment technique (CAT), which is a representative method assessing the creativity of artifacts, to compare results of the creativity assessment of the four expert groups on the converged products of science and art field. The research subjects are 15 shadow arts produced by elementary school science gifted students. The participants are 5 physicists and 5 artists, 10 science teachers and 10 art teachers. In this way, we intend to obtain implications on how to evaluate the converged products.
  • Professional Skills for Graduate Students

      • Professional Skills for Graduate Students

      • HD
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 2:30PM
      • by Lisa Goodhew
      • Type: Panel
      • This interactive panel focuses on developing professional skills for graduate students and other early-stage researchers. Our panelists will discuss important professional skills they have gained as graduate students, including how to become integrated with the community, develop specific research skills, and disseminate work. This session will feature time for discussion in order to foster peer mentoring between students. While this session is aimed toward graduate students, we welcome undergraduates who are interested this professional development opportunity or curious about life as a graduate student.
  • Recruiting Physics Teachers: Research and Best Practices

      • Best Practices at Texas State University Physics Department*

      • BG01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Hunter Close Eleanor Close

      • Type: Invited
      • Teaching is a complex profession that involves the synthesis of many diverse skills and components of knowledge, some practical and some intellectual. Perhaps more fundamental than these objects of knowing is that "teacher" is a way of being a person, with distinctive approaches to other people and their developing knowledge and skills, and also similarly to one's self. At Texas State University, the physics teacher preparation program and its supporting Learning Assistant program emphasize the formation of fundamental attitudes toward the teaching enterprise - attitudes of humility, curiosity, wonder, exploration, friendship, and mutual support. Texas State currently hosts the RADIANS Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program and is a former funded PhysTEC site. We describe the spirit of the program and how this shapes its practical design, and we illustrate the outcomes in attitudes of the program's teacher candidates and graduates. *Supported by NSF grants DUE-1557405 and PHY-0808790
      • Effectiveness of a Physics By Inquiry Course in a STEM Teacher Preparation Program

      • BG02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Donna Stokes
      • Type: Invited
      • This presentation highlights the outcomes of the development and implementation of a Physics By Inquiry course in the teachHouston STEM teacher preparation program at the University of Houston. Preparing and retaining qualified physics teachers is important since in major urban centers, 50–70% of beginning teachers leave the field within the first 4–6 years and 28.7% high school science teachers are teaching out of field. The Physics By Inquiry course engages pre-service high school STEM teachers in interactive, inquiry-based teaching pedagogies for physics. The course focuses on increasing the knowledge base for teaching physics through best practices in inquiry instruction through formal and informal experiences, and outcomes indicate positive impact on pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy in content knowledge, student engagement and use of inquiry style teaching in the classroom. In addition, the course has led to an increase in physics teacher production through the teachHouston program.
      • Recruiting Physics Teachers Who Succeed in the Classroom

      • BG03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 2:40PM
      • by Jill Marshall Pamela Romero, Michael Marder

      • Type: Contributed
      • Graduates of Texas UTeach secondary STEM teacher certification programs have been shown to go into teaching in larger numbers, stay in the classroom longer, and succeed with students from all demographics. Part of this success has come from recruiting broadly and removing barriers to entry in the admission process. I will describe the rubrics and metrics we use for admission into UTEach Austin and how these metrics, for example GPA, correspond to success in the classroom.
      • How Can AAPT Members Support 'Get the Facts Out'

      • BG04
      • Sun 01/13, 2:40PM - 2:50PM
      • by Drew Isola
      • Type: Contributed
      • Physics teachers have always been in high demand. With the decrease in enrollment in education departments across the nation, the number of prospective physics teachers have also dropped. “Get the Facts Out” is an initiative that is looking at how to change the conversations about the teaching profession. This talk will share how AAPT with other STEM associations are combining to change the conversation. The goal is to inform the members of AAPT the efforts of our association and how members can support the initiative.
      • Get the Facts Out: Understanding the Impact on Diverse Populations*

      • BG05
      • Sun 01/13, 2:50PM - 3:00PM
      • by Wendy Adams Richard Pearson, Savannah Logan

      • Type: Contributed
      • Recent research in STEM teacher preparation has identified strongly held beliefs about the teaching profession, many of which are misperceptions. These misperceptions discourage STEM undergraduates from exploring teaching as a viable career option. The Get the Facts Out campaign toolkit is designed to support faculty efforts to change the conversation about STEM teaching careers in their departments. The toolkit, based on pilot interventions that show positive results in shifting perceptions among students and faculty, and which have been shown to outperform traditional recruitment efforts, is designed to be customizable and adaptable to the local situation. Here we will share the research studies that have been designed to understand the response to these strategies with different populations of students. * This project is supported by NSF DUE-1821710.
      • Getting the Facts Out About the High School Teaching Career*

      • BG06
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:10PM
      • by Hsiapo Kuo Gay Stewart

      • Type: Contributed
      • Misperceptions about high school teaching discourage STEM undergraduates from exploring teaching as a viable career option. The Get the Facts Out campaign toolkit is designed to support faculty efforts to change the conversation about STEM teaching careers in their departments. Funded by NSF grants 1821710 and 1821462, this project involves professional societies in physics, mathematics and chemistry. In each field "Change Agents" have been chosen to help get the facts out. The authors are two of those change agents and will share information about their roles and plans.*This work is supported in part by grants from the National Science Foundation.
  • Results from the First Safe Space for People of Color Meeting In PERC

      • First Safe Space for People of Color Meeting Experience from a Junior Faculty

      • FF01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Carolina Alvarado
      • Type: Panel
      • Finding my place in the multiple environments I participate in has always been an interesting process. I attended my first PER conference as an international graduate student who was aiming to see her role in a bigger community. After five years of attending the conference, I found myself attending the First Safe Space for People of Color. This showed me a different perspective of PER and my own role in this community. I will share my personal take from this first meeting and the implications as a Junior Faculty going from my journey and linking it to the bigger system in which we are existing and performing PER. In order to understand the value of the creation of this safe space, we need to explore what factors in other spaces can make people of color not feel safe.
      • Reporting Out on Professional Opportunities and Allies

      • FF02
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Simone Hyater-Adams Alexis Knaub, Ayush Gupta, Geraldine Cochran

      • Type: Panel
      • On this panel, I will talk about two topics of discussion from the Safe Space for People of Color sessions at PERC 2017 and 2018 Meetings. As a session participant and a contributor to the sections in the document, I will provide a summary of the conversation, along with some ideas of ways the community can address some of the concerns brought up. The first topic is about professional opportunities. I will summarize the discussion from the sessions about personal and group experiences with facing barriers to professional opportunities stemming from our identities as people of color. The second topic is about the Allies Group. I will summarize the collective experiences with, feedback for, and concerns about the group that were raised during the sessions. I will also speak to some personal experiences with these topics, and give deeper insights from the conversations at each session.
      • People of Color in PER Dealing with Racism in Society

      • FF03
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • by Brian Zamarripa Roman Geraldine Cochran, Alexis Knaub

      • Type: Panel
      • As a society, we are aware of more instances of police brutality and everyday discrimination from businesses towards People of Color. It’s been going on for a while, but technology and the political climate have made it more prominent in the public eye. In addition to making it more prominent, the political climate and the current administration has allowed racism to be more overt and more violent. People of Color may not often experience blatant racism within the AAPT community; however, racism is expected once they step outside of the hotel/conference center and interact with local people, businesses, and authorities. While no place is genuinely safe from racism, some places, some locations are less safe than others. In this talk we have a more detailed discussion on the instances of racism and discrimination that may be experienced by conference attendees who are People of Color and ways that you can support your colleagues who experience this.
  • Saturday Evening Registration

      • Saturday Evening Registration

      • REG03
      • Sat 01/12, 6:30PM - 8:30PM
      • Leti Marquez
      • Type: Registration
  • Saturday Registration

      • Saturday Registration

      • REG02
      • Sat 01/12, 7:00AM - 4:00PM
      • Leti Marquez
      • Type: Registration
  • Science Cafe/Nerd Night: Scientists Engage the Public in Casual Settings

      • Science Cafe/Nerd Night: Scientists Engage the Public in Casual Settings

      • CD
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Richard Gelderma
      • Type: Panel
      • Zero-budget, Community-based Cafe Scientifique: 4 years and thriving

      • CD01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Richard Gelderman
      • Type: Panel
      • Imagine the best-ever dinner party conversation. That is what we promise with the Cafe Scientifique operating in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Started by the non-profit entity that runs our annual Science Festival, we desired a monthly event to keep our efforts in front of the population. Inaugurated in a micro-pub just opening its doors in the summer of 2015, our events grew on word of mouth, social media, and some manipulation of local TV, radio, and newspaper interviews. We don't charge and we don't pay. The speakers donate their time. The restaurant provides the space at no charge, The audience owes nothing up front, but is welcome to order a drink or something to eat while they participate in the discussions. The founder of Cafe Scientifique established a spirit of democratic conversation, and we do our best to stay true to that model. We promote topics, and don't distribute biographical sketches, titles, or affiliations with the name of the person leading the discussion. Rather than hosting a "lecture in a bar," we do not allow microphones or PowerPoints, and actively promote a free-flowing conversation between all.
      • Drinking in the Universe: Astronomy on Tap in San Antonio, TX

      • CD02
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Tracy Becker Vincent Hue, Emily Rice, Jeffery Silverman

      • Type: Panel
      • Astronomy on Tap (AoT) is a network of public outreach events that are typically hosted at bars and are designed to be laid-back, fun, and educational events for adults. AoT was started in 2013 by Dr. Meg Schwamb and has since spread to over 50 locationsacross the globe. Each “satellite” location taps into its local community of scientists and educators, reminding the audience that these experts are their neighbors. Each location also adapts and grows with the desires of that audience. At AoT SATX, hosted monthly in San Antonio, TX, two experts give 15-minute talks about different astronomical topics of their choice, followed by trivia. Having a larger, unifying network greatly eases the creation of the satellite events; however, there remain challenges in advertising, selecting strong public speakers, and engaging the audience. This presentation will discuss these challenges and the many successes and benefits of these casual-style outreach events.
      • Houston Nerd Nite

      • CD03
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Aaron Dunn
      • Type: Panel
      • .
  • Science and Society

      • Investigating Equity in the Physics Department at an HSI

      • EI01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 3:40PM
      • by Nicholas Hernandez Ruth Saunders

      • Type: Contributed
      • Humboldt State University has recently acquired the status of Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). The demographics of the university do not reflect the demographics of the surroundings area, this creates unique challenges. The demographics within the physics department at Humboldt State University has changed substantially over the past few years. While diversity overall has increased, equity has yet to be realized. This talk aims to quantify equity through data analysis of grade distributions from Humboldt State University. By diagnosing imbalanced equity, we can begin to develop strategies to ensure that a how a student identifies will not predict their outcome.
      • STEM-ER

      • EI02
      • Mon 01/14, 3:40PM - 3:50PM
      • by Atilla Kaya Bilal Sengez

      • Type: Contributed
      • STEAM - ER: Science Technology Engineering Art Math - Escape Room. Did you hear about escape rooms, where you are locked in a room and have an hour to escape from the room that is full of riddles. Think about all of the riddles are STEAM related. Furthermore, your students are setting up the rooms. I will also show couple of examples of how it looks like. We will also discuss benefits of this project.
      • Corpus Callosum: The Advantages of Art and Science Superposition

      • EI03
      • Mon 01/14, 3:50PM - 4:00PM
      • by Michael Welter
      • Type: Contributed
      • The intersection of art and science has a history dating as far back as the Renaissance with revolutionaries like Da Vinci and Michelangelo, but what is the current state of that relationship? During my summer with the Society of Physics Students as the Communications Intern, I got a first-hand look into the role that graphic design plays in the seemingly unartistic world of physics research and outreach. Composition and context play an integral role in an audience’s perception of information, but is often overlooked as insignificant by STEM researchers. By examining how the general public responds to visual media and incorporating design concepts to scientific media we can begin to diminish the commonly assumed “right/left-brain” view of art and science–which, in turn, benefits both the public by making complex data more digestible, and the scientific community by allowing the public/governing bodies to make more informed decisions.
      • STEM Through Amateur Radio (HAM Radio)

      • EI04
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:10PM
      • by Muhammed Benli
      • Type: Contributed
      • Amateur Radio (ham radio) is a popular hobby and service that brings people, electronics and communication together. People use ham radio to talk across town, around the world, or even into space, all without the Internet or cell phones. It's fun, social, educational, and can be a lifeline during times of need. You can set up a ham radio station anywhere! In a field, at a club station, or at home. Although Amateur Radio operators get involved for many reasons, they all have in common a basic knowledge of radio technology and operating principles, and pass an examination for the FCC license to operate on radio frequencies known as the "Amateur Bands." These bands are radio frequencies allocated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for use by ham radio operators. Amateur Radio has long been fertile ground for gaining knowledge and skill with electronics technology, as well as for hands-on experimentation and application of technology. Using Amateur Radio in the classroom is a proven and effective way to teach both fact and theory and align with state and national learning objectives-- in STEM curricula-- as well as other content areas. Amateur Radio is communication via a variety of methods across social, political, cultural, geographic and physical handicap boundaries. Amateur Radio integrates math, science, geography, reading and writing. Amateur Radio encourages hands-on investigation and experimentation as a basis for understanding technical subjects. Amateur Radio experiences are a motivating influence for many careers in computer sciences, consumer electronics, broadcast engineering, research sciences, medicine, telecommunications and more! Amateur Radio also enriches the lives of thousands of people as a way to meet and make friends, have fun and pursue a path of lifelong learning.
      • Texas A&M Physics Show

      • EI05
      • Mon 01/14, 4:10PM - 4:20PM
      • by Tatiana Erukhimova
      • Type: Contributed
      • The Texas A&M Physics Show started in 2007 and has been attended by 22,000 people since then. We offer 40-50 shows per year. The target audience for the Physics Show is preK-12. The show lasts 90 min and consists of three parts: 45-60 min show in the Auditorium, 20 min interactive Hands-on activities in the lobby, and the depth charge outside. Examples of demonstrations that we share with children include clouds, lightning, and magic bubbles, solid air and liquid oxygen, racquetballs fragile like glass and bananas as rigid as hammers, levitating trains and floating toilet paper and many more. The presentation is tailored to groups of different ages and “attention spans.” We’ll discuss pros and cons of starting a similar program and what it takes to run it all year round.
      • STEM Instruction in the Pop Culture Classroom

      • EI06
      • Mon 01/14, 4:20PM - 4:30PM
      • by Marco Machado
      • Type: Contributed
      • STEM instruction has seen graphic representations be used alongside text to improve student comprehension and retention for decades. With the rising popularity of comics, manga, and graphic novels in pop culture, an opportunity to further engage studentsby combining this pedagogical strategy with characters and themes students are familiar with has presented itself in the science classroom. Come see specific examples of how new media can be used to improve student interest, assessment variety, and content literacy, as well as learn about some of the best comics and graphic novels for teaching STEM.
      • Undergraduates Designing Demos for Science Outreach

      • EI07
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 4:40PM
      • by Michael Cone Robert Beaird

      • Type: Contributed
      • We will describe a new program at Rice University wherein undergraduate students design and develop high quality science demos for use in both the classroom, and outreach activities. The program runs over the span of an academic year (e.g., Fall 2018/Spring 2019), and involves a group of approximately twenty undergraduate students, and two faculty mentors. The students design and develop their own demo ideas in a process that is very similar to a research project. The same group then uses these demos in outreach activities, both on campus, and in the surrounding community. Thus, there is a twofold educational benefit for the program participants. We will also discuss the benefits such a program brings to a physics department, and the successes and difficulties we have experienced in implementing the program.
      • Detecting Solar Eclipses with Rooftop Solar Panels

      • EI08
      • Mon 01/14, 4:40PM - 4:50PM
      • by Jordan Steckloff
      • Type: Contributed
      • Photometers, devices that count photons and measure wavelength, are a very commonly used tool in astronomy. Astronomical photometers are ideally highly sensitive, accurate, and calibrated. However many other photosensitive systems record light activity, and can therefore act as a crude photometer. For example, rooftop solar panels detect events that affect the intensity of solar radiation, such as the Sun’s changing position in the sky, passing clouds, and the solar eclipse of August 21st, 2017. In this talk, I discuss how to read the photometric signals in a rooftop solar panel array. The solar panel system I used is a 7.2 kW array for residential energy production, and records average power production at 15 minute intervals. The resulting power production curve contains clear signals of events that affect solar radiation intensity on the ground (solar flux). I will show how to read the signals in such power production curves, to determine cloud cover on a given day, and to detect solar eclipses. Finally, I use these measurements to estimate the “carbon footprint” of the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse.
      • Bringing Power Grid Discussions into the Physics Classroom

      • EI09
      • Mon 01/14, 4:50PM - 5:00PM
      • by Jack Dostal
      • Type: Contributed
      • I teach a seminar for first-year students at Wake Forest University entitled, “Power and the U.S. Electrical Grid.” It is naturally interdisciplinary, drawing from physics, engineering, public policy, marketing, and other disciplines. No particular expertise in physics or mathematics is assumed of the students. Students come from all majors, not just the physical sciences. Course topics include estimation, circuits, power transmission, the history of DC and AC with Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, as well as a broad range of student-chosen topics. This talk will describe the seminar as well as the export of one of its modules regarding power transmission to a large-lecture general education physics class. Results from the larger class will be described as well as thoughts on implementing additional topics from the seminar class.
      • The Confusing Appearance of the Naked-Eye Planets

      • EI10
      • Mon 01/14, 5:00PM - 5:10PM
      • by Todd Timberlake
      • Type: Contributed
      • Ptolemaic and Copernican planetary theories predicted that the distances of Venus and Mars should vary by a factor of about 7. Thus, the angular diameter of these planets should vary by the same factor and their apparent areas should vary by about a factor of about 50. To the naked eye, though, these planets appear as circular disks with an apparent size that changes little, if at all. We now know that the appearances of the planets to the naked eye are affected by phases (for inferior planets), but mostly by the limitations of human vision. This talk will explore the history of this topic, show how modern measurements of the performance of the human eye explain why the planets appear as they do, and discuss how Galileo's telescope exceeded the limitations of the eye and revealed the true size and shape of the planets.
      • The Secret Physics of the Periodic Table

      • EI11
      • Mon 01/14, 5:10PM - 5:20PM
      • by James Lincoln
      • Type: Contributed
      • Far from just chemistry lab wallpaper, the periodic table's periodicity has been shown to be caused by the underlying physics of the nucleus. The perspective of physics helps us answer many questions that chemists cannot! Why are most elements metals? Why are there three noble metals all in the same column? Why are the three ferromagnetic elements neighbors? Where do the names S, P, D, F come from? Discovery the physics behind these questions and more as we investigate The Secret Physics of the Periodic Table.
  • Space Science in Introductory Courses

      • Drop Tower Physics

      • FG01
      • Mon 01/14, 6:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Toby Dittrich Greg Mulder

      • Type: Invited
      • Drop Tower Physics is a space science classroom tool that will challenge and interest students and professors alike. The Dryden Drop Tower at Portland State University creates micro-gravity for 2.1 seconds, and has been used to videotape various physics demonstrations as they undergo a transition from g= 9.8 m/s2 to zero. How does a floating cork, stack of coins, pendulum, mass spring oscillator, and chaotic pendulum behave as the acceleration due to gravity seemingly, for the falling non- inertial reference frame, disappears? Drop Tower Physics asks the students to postulate the behavior of these examples and to test that against their knowledge of physics. If the postulate conforms with physical laws, the videos constitute the experimental branch of physics. Of course, theory and experiment must match. The actual behavior often surprises and amazes them, leading to a deeper understanding of the demonstrations. Drop Tower Physics will do this for you, too.
      • Space Center Houston: Gateway for Space Science Exploration and Learning

      • FG02
      • Mon 01/14, 7:00PM - 7:30PM
      • by Phyllis Friello
      • Type: Invited
      • Phyllis Friello, Education Manager at Space Center Houston will present an overview of the Center’s education programs and resources for students and adults. Understanding both the importance and often difficulty of keeping current on space exploration programs and content, a focal point of the presentation will be strategies to provide authentic and topical learning experiences to students and adults. Featured will be Space Center Houston’s Space Center University programs which bridge the gap between NASA’s scientists and engineers and the public, providing accessible and timely transfer of content to educators and students.
      • From Thermonuclear Fusion to Rocket Propulsion, a Physics Journey of Challenge and Opportunity

      • FG03
      • Mon 01/14, 7:30PM - 8:00PM
      • by Franklin Chang Diaz
      • Type: Invited
      • Responding to the world oil shortage of the early 1970s, the US Government invested heavily on new energy research, including controlled thermonuclear fusion. This became a formidable motivator for advancing the field of plasma physics. New knowledge wasquickly gained and, albeit indirectly, the VASIMR® engine* became an early product of the scientific bonanza. In this talk I shall present the fundamental physics of the VASIMR® engine and describe how these principles have guided the evolution of the technology from its formative years at MIT and NASA, to its technological maturation at the Ad Astra Rocket Company. I shall comment briefly on some of the challenges, opportunities and plans for its commercial deployment in cislunar space and eventually as an option for fast human interplanetary transportation. * Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket
  • Success Stories of Female Physicists

      • The Allure of Atoms: Finding Success as a Condensed Matter Physicist

      • GE01
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 9:00AM
      • by Kristen Burson Kristen Burson

      • Type: Invited
      • How can we see the atoms in glass and what patterns do they form? Glass is widely used in daily life, from windows, to fiber optics, to kitchenware, yet questions still remain about its atomic structure. In this talk, I will describe my experiences as a condensed matter physicist specializing in high-resolution atomic force microscopy. I’ll talk about how to “take pictures” of atoms using scanning probe microscopy and share some of the highlights of my research on the atomic-scale structure of two-dimensional amorphous silica (also known as glass). Charting out a career in physics can seem similarly amorphous. Throughout the talk, I will reflect on core elements of my success as a physicist: personal attitudes, effective mentors, and positive peer communities.
      • STEP UP 4 Women: Supporting Teachers to Encourage the Pursuit of Undergraduate Physics for Women*

      • GE02
      • Tue 01/15, 9:00AM - 9:30AM
      • by Robynne Lock Zahra Hazari, Theodore Hodapp, Rebecca Vieyra, Raina Khatri

      • Type: Invited
      • Only 20 percent of the students pursuing bachelor’s degrees in physics are women despite the fact that almost half of high school physics students are women. STEP UP 4 Women is an ambitious project with the goal of increasing the representation of women in physics by mobilizing and supporting high school physics teachers nationwide to recruit young women to become physics majors. This project develops, refines, and propagates research-based strategies that support the physics identity development of young women. This session will describe these strategies and the results of our pilot study. For more information or to join the movement, visit www.stepup4women.org.
  • Successful Online Astronomy Labs

      • Creating Successful Online Astronomy Labs

      • GF01
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 9:00AM
      • by Rodney Lee
      • Type: Invited
      • Portland Community College (Portland, Oregon) in cooperation with the Oregon NASA Space Grant have made it possible for our physical science faculty to design three 100-level online lab science courses: The Solar System, Stars and Stellar Evolution, and Galaxies and Cosmology. These courses have made it possible for students to earn science lab credits at a distance. Creating quality, well-designed online labs that are interactive, experiential, meaningful, and accessible are keys to student success and retainment. We will explore some excellent tools now widely available to course designers including open educational resources, online simulations, remote instrument use, and astronomy software. In addition, we will look at modifying traditional astronomy labs for the online world of science education. We will provide a list of astronomy lab resources to all who attend this talk.
      • The Rankin Astronomy Facilities, Online Laboratory Activities and Remote Observing

      • GF02
      • Tue 01/15, 9:00AM - 9:30AM
      • by David Sitar
      • Type: Invited
      • The Rankin introductory astronomy laboratory and observatory is a truly unique and cutting-edge facility. It could possibly be the only one of its kind in the U.S., and it provides an extraordinary experience for our students, as well as the public during on-campus outreach programs. Fifteen permanently mounted Celestron CPC1100’s are under a roll-back roof, allowing for last-minute decision making when it comes to weather. In addition, all scopes have a back-mounted STF8300C CCD camera attached, providing astrophotography opportunities for all students. Each of these telescope stations can be controlled manually out on the roof deck or remotely from the comfort of our indoor laboratory.
  • Sunday Registration

      • Sunday Registration

      • REG04
      • Sun 01/13, 7:00AM - 4:00PM
      • Leti Marquez
      • Type: Registration
  • Teacher Training/Enhancement

      • iTEAMS: An Integrated STEM Professional Development Program for Teachers*

      • CH01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 5:40PM
      • by Jennifer Docktor Gubbi Sudhakaran, Jerry Redman, Josh Hertel, Mike LeDocq

      • Type: Contributed
      • A Mathematics and Science Partnerships project at the University of Wisconsin – La Crosse provided professional development (PD) to local teachers in integrating Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics with Science (iTEAMS). Teachers in high-needsschool districts from grades 5-12 participated in summer institutes and ongoing weekend workshops during the two years of the project. The PD was aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards and was designed to include engineering and Lego Mindstorms robotics projects. We will summarize activities and findings from the entire grant project including gains in teacher content knowledge, science teaching efficacy and beliefs, student achievement data, and other impacts of the project.
      • Progress of PSI^3

      • CH02
      • Sun 01/13, 5:40PM - 5:50PM
      • by Richard Pearson Wendy Adams, Kristine Callan

      • Type: Contributed
      • One aspect of our science teacher preparation program, PSI^3 (Partnerships for Science Identity: Three Populations of Active Learners), partners pairs of future secondary teacher candidates with elementary teachers and their students. This partnership ismeant to develop science identities to both the elementary teachers and their students, encourage and empower elementary teachers to teach more science activities, present examples of classroom management to the teacher candidates, and to establish vertical articulation expectations with teacher candidates. Topical activity kits are developed and constructed by the candidates in conjunction with the elementary teachers, who then distribute them to the elementary classrooms. The boxed activities provide engaging science learning designed to inspire elementary teachers and their students. Summaries of these activities, initial responses, and challenges will be presented, along with future extensions of the PSI^3 program. This project is supported by 100Kin10.
      • An Online Master's in Physics to Support In-service High School Physics Teachers

      • CH03
      • Sun 01/13, 5:50PM - 6:00PM
      • by William Newton Robynne Lock, Bahar Modir

      • Type: Contributed
      • I will report on the progress of a new online Master's in physics designed specifically for in-service high school physics teachers. Piloted as six face-to-face courses to an initial cohort of 7 in 2014-15, there are currently over 60 students enrolled from 16 different states and three countries. The program is intended to help physics teachers by reinforcing their content knowledge, introduce them to advanced physics topics, enhance their teaching by studying the content through the lens of physics education research, and provide access to teaching resources and a community of fellow physics teachers with whom to share ideas and support. In this talk we discuss the challenges of creating a physics Master's program to meet the needs of physics teachers and cater to a variety of backgrounds, and give an overview of the content of our classes.
      • Improving the Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Teaching Assistants

      • CH04
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:10PM
      • by Alexandru Maries
      • Type: Contributed
      • Being aware of common student alternate conceptions in physics is beneficial when designing instruction to help students develop a coherent knowledge structure. It is thus not surprising that knowledge of common student difficulties is one aspect of whatShulman coined “pedagogical content knowledge”, or in other words, knowledge about how to teach a subject that is different from the content knowledge itself. This talk will discuss a semester-long professional development program designed to improve the pedagogical content knowledge of TAs (undergraduate and graduate students teaching recitations) as well as improve their effectiveness as educators. Finally, results from over three years of the implementation of this program will be presented.
      • Enhancing Instruction and Engaging Students Through Theories of Theatrical Magic

      • CH05
      • Sun 01/13, 6:10PM - 6:20PM
      • by Philip La Porta
      • Type: Contributed
      • Educators that have attended any recent professional development workshops have certainly been urged to make sure our students are actively engaged in learning. We are constantly bombarded with information about the importance of, and learn various methods to help increase student engagement. However, the advice we receive and the methods that are taught often ignore an obvious truth: method alone is not enough to ensure students are engaged and learning. Fortunately, we can use theories found in the performance of theatrical magic as a tool for reflective practice. This talk examines five important principles in the performance of theatrical magic and how they can be used to improve our teaching methods and dramatically increase student engagement.
      • 21st Century e-portfolios: Outreach, Tracking and Training with Share & Shine Model

      • CH06
      • Sun 01/13, 6:20PM - 6:30PM
      • by Fatih Gozuacik
      • Type: Contributed
      • 21st Century; everything has changed, all moved into digital portals. One great way to build up your resume, keep track of your awesome work, do school outreach, attract best students into your AP classes and principal amusement...Benefits don't fit here. I started using Google+, YouTube, and Facebook as an educational tool and it sparkled my teaching way. Parents see and get proud of their kids' work, school yells out that we are a STEM academy, teachers create their name brands... Reaching your society with such tools inspires next generations and increases STEM awareness. You can also use these interactive albums to train other teachers even in other countries! Only thing you need is an internet connection and then "share & shine." In this session you will see how to use and reroute social media, and critical points need to be careful. Best practices of a sharing & shining physics teacher…
  • Teaching with Data: Multi-messenger Astronomy

      • Extracting Astrophysics from Gravitational Waves: GW170817 Case Study

      • CE01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 6:00PM
      • by Amber Stuver
      • Type: Invited
      • A new era of multi-messenger astronomy began with the coincident detection of gravitational waves by LIGO (an event labeled GW170817) and electromagnetic waves by over 70 observatories across and orbiting Earth. Part of the light observed came in the form of a short gamma-ray burst; the source of this class of GRB has been a longstanding mystery. The observation of associated gravitational waves finally proved that the merger of a neutron star binary system is a source of these bursts. This talk will focus on how information about a gravitational wave source is extracted from the recorded signal and the contributions this makes to a fuller understanding of our universe. Classroom connections with references to the GW170817 detection will be discussed.
      • The Complementarity of Multi-wavelength and Multi-messenger Observations

      • CE02
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:30PM
      • by Joseph Romano
      • Type: Invited
      • Just as sight and sound provide complementary information about the everyday world around us, so to do electromagnetic and gravitational-wave observations for celestial objects in the universe. In this talk, I will give examples showing the wealth of information provided by multi-wavelength observations of the electromagnetic sky, and then describe how that picture is enlarged by gravitational-wave observations. References will be made to GW170817, our first multi-messenger observation of a binary neutron star merger.
  • The Impact of Policy and/or Regulations on Access to Higher Education in STEM Fields

      • The Impact of Policy and/or Regulations on Access to Higher Education in STEM Fields

      • EH01
      • Mon 01/14, 3:30PM - 4:00PM
      • by Verónica Guajardo
      • Type: Invited
      • This session will focus on how policies influence students’ choices to pursue higher education as well as students’ access to resources that support the pursuit of higher education for STEM fields, with an emphasis on marginalized populations, in particular Chicanx/Latinx populations. This session is intended to follow the session reporting on 2017 and 2018 Spaces for People of Color in Physics Education Research. As such common themes regarding people of color in physics and STEM spaces will be present in both of these sessions.
      • Promoting Chicanx/Latinx Student Engagement in Undergraduate Research

      • EH02
      • Mon 01/14, 4:00PM - 4:30PM
      • by Jessica Salvador
      • Type: Invited
      • Undergraduate research has been identified as a high-impact learning practice that extends undergraduate students’ learning beyond the classroom, helps them define their academic goals, and increases their awareness and knowledge about graduate and professional schools. Prior studies have found these opportunities to be especially important for students from underrepresented populations in higher education who would not know of future academic possibilities or see themselves pursuing advanced degrees. This study explored how seven first generation Chicanx/Latinx undergraduate students accessed and engaged in undergraduate research. This qualitative multiple case study draws from education, sociology, and information behavior literature. Findings discussed will address key areas that impacted how students experienced access to and engagement in undergraduate research, including the role of institutional actors and information grounds as catalysts for student access to research, and the role of the research space as a “safe space” for students during their engagement in research.
      • Considering STEM Graduate Education and Pathways to the Professoriate

      • EH03
      • Mon 01/14, 4:30PM - 5:00PM
      • by Frank Fernandez
      • Type: Invited
      • Between 1920 and 2010, the U.S. witnessed an almost exponential increase in doctoral education in STEM fields. However, the percentage of STEM doctorates awarded to U.S.-born people of color has stayed persistently low since the 1970s. The lack of diversity in STEM graduate programs contributes to a lack of diversity in the professoriate. The speaker will discuss the benefits to having ethnically and racially diverse faculty members, including mentoring ethnically and racially diverse undergraduate students to go to graduate school and encouraging graduate students to pursue faculty careers. Additionally, the speaker will discuss policies and practices that contribute to diversity in graduate education and the professoriate.
  • The Living Physics Course: New Ideas and Old Tricks

      • IPLS at an Engineering School

      • HE01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 1:00PM
      • by Nicholas Darnton JC Gumbart , Jennifer Curtis

      • Type: Invited
      • Georgia Tech recently implemented a new IPLS "flavor" of our calculus-based introductory physics sequence. In adapting the University of Maryland, College Park framework to our target audience (biology, chemistry and neuroscience majors), we increased the number of online and written problems while reducing the scope of labs to allow for longer recitation sessions. A major motivation for the creation of the IPLS course was the alarming failure rate of life science majors in GA Tech’s traditional intro physics courses (30% DFW in recent years); we reduced the DFW rate by a factor of three while modestly raising average grades in the course by roughly half a point. Anecdotally, we observe enthusiasm for this approach, with enrollment growing with each subsequent offering. However, problems arise for students switching between IPLS and the traditional sequence mid-year.
      • Bringing Biology to Physicists and Physics to Biologists

      • HE02
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:30PM
      • by Ching-Hwa Kiang
      • Type: Invited
      • Biological physics is an emerging field of physics. In fact, biology and medicine related sciences have been growing in almost all areas of science and engineering. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 recognized the accomplishment in biological physics, and awarded optical tweezers and their application to biological systems along with other inventions in laser physics. I initiated teaching of biological physics in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Rice University more than 15 years ago, by offering introductory biological physics courses at both undergraduate and graduate levels. The students came from a variety of backgrounds, including physics, chemistry, biochemistry, engineering, and religion majors. Unlike most other traditional physics course, biological courses have evolved over the years and continued to be updated. In this talk, I will share my view of the importance and my experience in teaching biological physics courses.
  • The New Advanced Laboratory

      • A novel system for teaching lab on vacuum physics

      • by Yongkang Le
      • Type: Contributed
      • Vacuum physics and related technique is very important topics for graduate students in physics. Unfortunately, we don’t have enough teaching labs in this area. Here, we report on a novel system for teaching lab on vacuum physics. The apparatus consists mainly of two spherical chambers connected with specially designed flanges. The connection design enables installation of different vacuum components. On this new system, the following teaching labs can be carried out: 1) Calibration of different vacuum gauges; 2) Flow conductance measurement of different tubes in vacuum.
      • Experiment-based Resources for Teaching Optics & Photonics, Applied Laser Physics & Imaging Science

      • BH01
      • Sun 01/13, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Gabriel Spalding
      • Type: Invited
      • This talk aims to share resources for use in your own teaching. I teach labs starting with qualitative observation of aberrations, using hand-held lenses, then "walking a laser" through "cloned apertures" on an optical breadboard, and "optical cloaking" as a means of teaching ABCD matrices. Students disassemble "broken" classroom projectors. They use diffraction to find the "filling fraction" of their Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs), and compare those to educational SLMs and low-cost Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs), which are used for teaching Fourier Optics, computer-generated Holograms, Aberration Correction, Laser Modes, encoding information, linear momentum, spin angular momentum, and orbital angular momentum of light beams. This complements an introduction to single-photon quantum mechanics, including "Ghost Imaging," where the photons incident upon the detecting camera have never interacted with the object imaged (by exploiting correlations that are required by simple principles: conservation of energy and conservation of momentum.)
      • Updating the Advanced Lab – What Do Faculty Choose to Change?

      • BH02
      • Sun 01/13, 2:00PM - 2:30PM
      • by Lowell McCann
      • Type: Invited
      • The Advanced Laboratory Physics Association’s (ALPhA’s) Laboratory Immersion program exists to help faculty and staff improve their knowledge about experiments that have been developed for undergraduate courses beyond the introductory year. The choices participants in these programs make can tell us about how these labs are (or aren't) changing in the country and what may be influencing those changes. In this talk, I will look at the experiments participants chose and their implementation rates to investigate those changes.
      • Takeaways from BFY3: Integrating Experiment, Theory, and Computation

      • BH03
      • Sun 01/13, 2:30PM - 3:00PM
      • by Joseph Kozminski
      • Type: Invited
      • Building on the themes of the previous Conferences on Laboratory Instruction Beyond the First Year (BFY), BFY III highlighted creating engaging laboratory experiences that integrate experiment, theory, and computation. The conference provided hands-on workshops, plenary talks, breakout sessions, and poster sessions aimed at developing laboratory experiences that help students develop good laboratory practices and a range of transferrable skills while enriching their understanding of physics and interdisciplinary applications of physics. Formal and informal networking allowed for dialog and community building so that discussions from BFY III would continue beyond the conference. This talk will provide takeaways from the conference, an overview of the post-conference survey results, and opportunities and challenges for the advanced lab community moving forward.
      • Simple and Inexpensive Lensfree Holographic Microscopy

      • BH04
      • Sun 01/13, 3:00PM - 3:30PM
      • by Euan McLeod
      • Type: Invited
      • In the last two decades, there has been an explosion in the capability of portable consumer computing and imaging technologies, such as smartphones and their integrated camera modules. This surge in technology can be harnessed to develop high-performance, high throughput, inexpensive, and field-portable microscopic imaging platforms to be used as diagnostic tools in point-of-care and resource-limited settings. This presentation will show how to use these sensors in lens-free holographic imaging where an in-line hologram is captured on an image sensor and computational techniques are used to reconstruct an image of the sample from its hologram. Lens-free holographic microscopy platforms are well-suited for undergraduate laboratory courses and research. A range of devices where undergraduates have played a major role in their design, fabrication, testing, and analysis will be presented. In many cases, the image quality obtained using these devices rivals the image quality of much larger and more expensive laboratory-based equipment.
  • The Physics of Extreme Mineral Exploration

      • Lunar Mining: A Primer

      • HF01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 1:00PM
      • by Kurt Klaus
      • Type: Invited
      • All space faring nations have interest in lunar exploration many with an eye towards lunar resource prospecting and exploitation. As we humans turn our sights to exploration beyond the earth-moon system, the moon becomes attractive for many reasons, not the least of which is its potential for refueling and replenishment of water and oxygen for life support as well as construction materials. We will outline sources of lunar resources, prospecting and production methods. We will consider the challenges of the lunar environment for exploration by humans and machines. We will outline NASA’s plans for commercial lunar exploration and provide a glimpse at the next 10 – 20 years of lunar exploration.
      • Fractured Energy

      • HF02
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:30PM
      • by Priscilla Villa
      • Type: Invited
      • In Shale regions across the U.S., the oil and gas ‘fracking’ boom has made a lasting impact. Hydraulic Fracturing (Fracking), combined with horizontal drilling, are a technological combination that requires millions of gallons of water, sand, and chemicals to break through shale rock formation to extract oil and gas. Development of these shale wells emits methane, a greenhouse gas 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide, and volatile organic compounds that are known to cause human health impacts. Through Earthworks’ Community Empowerment Project, we utilize optical gas imaging technology to detect emissions from oil and gas production and make the invisible visible to communities across the U.S. From earthquakes to waste water to climate change, I’ll discuss how shale development and fracking have disrupted our environment and why they are not part of a sustainable energy future.
      • Oil and Gas Methane Emissions

      • HF03
      • Tue 01/15, 1:30PM - 2:00PM
      • by Shareen Yawanarajah
      • Type: Invited
      • Methane is a gas that can come from many sources, both natural and man-made. It is the primary component of natural gas, a common fuel source. The largest source of industrial methane emissions is the oil and gas industry. If methane leaks into the air —from a leaky pipe, for instance—it absorbs the Sun's heat, warming the atmosphere. For this reason, methane is considered a greenhouse gas, like carbon dioxide. While methane does not linger as long in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, it is initially more devastating to the climate because of how effectively it absorbs heat. In fact, about 25% of the man-made global warming being experienced today is caused by methane emissions. Environmental Defense Fund studies have transformed our understanding of methane emissions from the oil and gas industry, and we now know that reducing emissions from this sector is the fastest, most cost-effective way we have to slow the rate of warming today.
  • The Wonderful World of AJP

      • Insights into Reversible and Irreversible Thermodynamic Cycles

      • GI01
      • Tue 01/15, 8:30AM - 9:00AM
      • by Harvey Leff
      • Type: Invited
      • Cycles are a traditional part of thermodynamics coverage, and although actual heat engines and refrigerators are irreversible, most cycles in textbooks are reversible. I'll examine irreversible quasistatic Carnot, Kelvin, and Stirling cycles and compare them with their reversible counterparts. The irreversible versions of reversible heat engines or refrigerators, especially ones with variable-temperature paths, more closely represent real cycles that operate between high and low temperatures. I'll use temperature vs. entropy graphs to help clarify energy flows and to obtain efficiency bounds. One little known such bound is that the coefficient of performance of an arbitrary reversible refrigerator cycle is greater than or equal to that for a reversible Carnot cycle operating between the arbitrary cycle's maximum and minimum temperatures.
      • Measuring General Relativistic Time Dilation; An Undergraduate Lab

      • GI02
      • Tue 01/15, 9:00AM - 9:30AM
      • by Shane Burns
      • Type: Invited
      • General relativity predicts that clocks run more slowly near massive objects. The effect is small—a clock at sea level lags behind one 1000 m above sea level by only 9.4 ns/day. Here, we demonstrate that a measurement of this effect can be done by undergraduate students. Our paper describes an experiment conducted by undergraduate researchers at Colorado College and the United States Air Force Academy to measure gravitational time dilation. The measurement was done by comparing the signals generated by a GPS frequency standard (sea-level time) to a Cs-beam frequency standard at seven different altitudes above sea level. We found that our measurements are consistent with the predictions of general relativity.
  • Tuesday Registration

      • Tuesday Registration

      • REG06
      • Tue 01/15, 8:00AM - 3:00PM
      • Leti Marquez
      • Type: Registration
  • UTeach at 20 years

      • Origins and Consequences of UTeach at The University of Texas at Austin

      • CF01
      • Sun 01/13, 5:30PM - 6:00PM
      • by Michael Marder
      • Type: Invited
      • UTeach is a STEM teacher preparation program at The University of Texas at Austin. It started in the fall of 1997, partly as a response to changes in Texas state policy a decade before. The program design was a collaboration between three groups: Master Teachers, who are award-winning former secondary STEM teachers, STEM education research faculty, and research faculty from the College of Natural Sciences. Hallmarks of the program include early and repeated field experiences, emphasis upon content knowledge, emphasis upon inquiry in general and project-based instruction in particular, and attention to constraints on university students including time and money. UTeach eventually expanded across the country, but in addition its example played a role in numerous additional educational developments at UT Austin, including growth of the physics major, and a Freshman Research Initiative. This session will describe these developments.
      • Strengthening STEM Teacher Preparation Through a National Networked Improvement Community

      • CF02
      • Sun 01/13, 6:00PM - 6:30PM
      • by Kimberly Hughes
      • Type: Invited
      • 20 Years. 44 Universities. 700 Faculty. 4500 Graduates. Ten years ago, UTeach expanded beyond UT Austin and the National UTeach network was born. The UTeach Institute serves as the hub of a vibrant, networked improvement community made up of 44 university-based UTeach secondary STEM teacher preparation programs all committed to developing STEM literacy for all students through innovation and excellence in university-based teacher education. We will share data on our collective impact and discuss the historical development of the UTeach network, how we collaborate to share best practices and address common challenges, and the current challenges we are tackling as a community.
      • STEM Teacher Preparation at the University of Houston: teachHOUSTON

      • CF03
      • Sun 01/13, 6:30PM - 7:00PM
      • by Paige Evans
      • Type: Invited
      • The University of Houston’s (UH) STEM teacher preparation program, teachHOUSTON, is the first replication site of UTeach, a nationally acclaimed program. teachHOUSTON began in 2007 and is a collaboration between the College of Natural Science and Mathematics (NSM), the College of Education, and local school districts and aims to combat the shortage of qualified math and science teachers. The program provides grades 7-12 teacher certification for students obtaining an NSM degree while emphasizing early and ongoing field experiences. This session will examine replicating UTeach, the impact on STEM teacher production, and current initiatives including culturally relevant pedagogy. Additionally, the collaboration between teachHOUSTON and the physics department will be highlighted which has resulted in streamlined degree plans for physics majors and minors, physics courses for both middle school and high school preservice teachers, and grant funded internships and scholarships.
  • Upper Division and Graduate

      • Self-Sustained Oscillator Experiments

      • HG01
      • Tue 01/15, 12:30PM - 12:40PM
      • by Randall Tagg Masoud Asadi

      • Type: Contributed
      • Self-sustained oscillation, in which a steady energy source is used to maintain a nonlinear system in steady limit-cycle oscillation, is literally at the "heart" of living systems and much of technology. Deep understanding of the fundamental ideas of such systems is accessible within the frame first presented in courses on the physics of vibrations and waves when this frame is extended with fundamental tools of dynamical systems theory. The electronic Wien Bridge oscillator - often seen as a quick throw-together audio sine wave oscillator - is a potent source of insights into the practical realization of self-sustained oscillators. It also reveals some surprises in the dynamics, such as a phenomenon called "squegging". We present experiments and numerical simulations organized within a Jupyter notebook. The learning approach demonstrates an advanced technical competency in practical skills identified as one of the major goals of the recent AAPT guidelines for laboratory courses. Also, several pathways into contemporary research will be described.
      • Modeling Sensitivity to Initial Conditions of Rotational Dynamics

      • HG02
      • Tue 01/15, 12:40PM - 12:50PM
      • by Joseph Gutheinz Madeline Carter, James Clarage

      • Type: Contributed
      • Classical Dynamics, although simplistic in its elegance, poses many questions yet to be answered. One such problem begs the simple question: why does a book wobble erratically in flight when flipped about one of its sides? In light of this phenomenon, our research group has conducted research concerning a parallelepiped’s rotation in three-dimensional space, integrating both dynamic drag effects due to air friction and kinematic initial conditions to plot the motion of a parallelepipedal object in space as a function of time. This model was then compared to accelerometer data collected from a sensor-enabled PASCO Smart Cart with identical geometry to the computational model. Comparison with our experimental data sets led to the development of a physically predictive computational model for the motion of a parallelepiped in three-dimensional space, thus further shedding light on the original mystery of rotational instability under particular conditions.
      • Green Light, Red Light: NV Center Diamond Magnetometry

      • HG03
      • Tue 01/15, 12:50PM - 1:00PM
      • by Joshua Bridger
      • Type: Contributed
      • Research into the optical properties of color centers in diamonds has recently led to the development of precise quantum sensing instruments and offers promise in the field of quantum computing. In an effort to bring contemporary research techniques and topics to advanced placement and undergraduate physics students, an exploration of optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in an NV rich diamond was developed {and described in the American Journal of Physics – AJP 86, 225 (2018)}. Recently, a low-cost, portable, exhibit version of this experiment was developed, with the aim of bringing ODMR in NV rich diamonds to a wide range of students, from middle school to undergraduate. Detailed component lists, multi-level explorations and setup instructions were developed and are now available to institutions wishing to create similar setups. An overview of the setup, theory and associated curriculum will be presented.
      • Building Confidence in the Delta-Dirac Function

      • HG04
      • Tue 01/15, 1:00PM - 1:10PM
      • by Constantin Rasinariu Asim Gangopadhyaya

      • Type: Contributed
      • We present an example from undergraduate quantum mechanics designed to highlight the versatility of the delta-Dirac function. Namely, we compute the expectation value of the Hamiltonian of a free-particle in a state described by a triangular wave function. Since the first derivative of is piecewise constant, and because this Hamiltonian is proportional to the second order spatial derivative, students often end up finding the expectation value to be zero –an unphysical answer. This problem provides a pedagogical application of the delta-Dirac function. By arriving at the same result via alternate pathways, this exercise reinforces students’ confidence in the Dirac-delta function and highlights its efficiency and elegance.
      • Student Understanding of Spin in Graduate Quantum Mechanics

      • HG05
      • Tue 01/15, 1:10PM - 1:20PM
      • by Christopher Porter Andrew Heckler

      • Type: Contributed
      • Spin is a topic integral to many areas of physics and to emerging technologies. Spin also encompasses much of the “strangeness” of quantum mechanics and can be non-intuitive, a fact that has led many instructors to advocate teaching spin even before wavefunctions. In this work we investigate student understanding of spin at the graduate level. In many cases, data are included from pre-tests and post-tests. Data are included from three large, Midwestern universities, and multiple cohorts. We identify a number of deficits and student difficulties. We also find that results from different universities are comparable, which suggests our findings may be general. We examine student understanding of orthogonality of spin states, spin addition, and exchange symmetry.
      • Design of Fresnel Acoustic Lens

      • HG06
      • Tue 01/15, 1:20PM - 1:30PM
      • by Yan Cen Fangting Chen, Yongkang Le, Jinglin Lv

      • Type: Contributed
      • Teachers can easily show students the phenomenon of light focusing by optical lenses or Fresnel zone plates. However, there is no suitable device for acoustic focusing to be presented. In this paper, an acoustic lens is designed based on the principles of Fresnel zone plate and fabricated with acrylic. We propose a model similar to thin lens imaging to explain the focusing of sound waves by Fresnel acoustic lenses. The focal length of the lenses is mainly determined by the geometric parameters and the frequency of sound wave. Higher frequencies and shorter focal length correspond to lens of smaller size. To verify our theoretical model, an experiment is carried out and the results are in good agreement with our theoretical model. Such an acoustic lens has the advantages of easy producing and low costs which make it a good teaching device to impart the knowledge of acoustic focusing to students.
      • Exploring Novel Experiment Methods for Accurately Measuring Relative Permittivity

      • HG07
      • Tue 01/15, 1:30PM - 1:40PM
      • by Yan Liang
      • Type: Contributed
      • This manuscript primarily introduces three experimental methods for accurately measuring the relative permittivity of solids employing parallel plate capacitors. By designing various measuring circuits elaborately, the systematical errors caused by material extrusion deformation, marginal effect resulted from limited parallel plate capacitors, and distributed capacitance derived from the measuring circuits are solved, respectively. Furthermore, it was found in experimental process that adjusting parallel plate capacitor to be absolute parallel is difficult. Therefore, we further improved the experiment method and creatively proposed a three-plate system to solve this problem, efficaciously enhancing the measurement accuracy of relative permittivity in parallel plate capacitors.
      • Two-Dimensional Classical Analog for Quantum Band Structure

      • HG08
      • Tue 01/15, 1:40PM - 1:50PM
      • by Parker Roberts Cameron Bensley, Shawn Hilbert

      • Type: Contributed
      • In condensed matter physics, quantum band structure is a vital framework for understanding how the Hamiltonian of a system of many atoms contributes to macroscopic material properties. Band structure is typically introduced through a level-splitting approach, in which it is shown that the addition of overlapping Coulomb potentials causes splitting of the allowed electron energies. When more atoms are added to the system, energy levels continue to split to the point of forming continuous regions of allowed energies, or bands. This phenomenon can be better understood and taught with analogies from classical mechanics, and it has been experimentally shown that both level-splitting and band formation occur in the frequency spectrum of a system of many coupled harmonic oscillators. This research seeks to extend this analogy to two dimensions, using an array of oscillators to show the 2D lattice-based interactions of frequencies. Both computational simulations and an experimental apparatus are utilized.
      • Black Hole and Baby Universe

      • HG09
      • Tue 01/15, 1:50PM - 2:00PM
      • by Ankit Gaur
      • Type: Contributed
      • How are black holes are formed? Answer is related with the gravity and internal pressure within the star. These two things oppose each other the gravitational force of star which will cause the matter to fall inward but internal pressure of star acting outward wants to cause the matter to fly outwards. When these two forces are balanced, the star will maintain its size, neither collapsing nor expanding. But when a star runs out of its fuel then the surface tends to bound inward under the gravitational pull of the star and the star collapses down. Let’s move towards the color of black hole. The color of the black hole is not black. Because the uncertainty principle allows some of the particle to travel faster than the speed of light for very shorter distances leading to radiation leakage from event horizon loading to give off the particle away from the black hole and radiation reaching at that stage of vanishing black holes completely. Now if there is a black hole, then as because physics laws are time symmetric. So there ought to be other things from where the objects can come out but not fall into. This is White Hole. Now, if we got an object from where the things can come out but the question is that where do these things go after coming out from the black hole? This is called a BABY UNIVERSE of the Universe.
      • A New Survey: Faculty Perceptions of Teaching as a Profession

      • HG10
      • Tue 01/15, 2:00PM - 2:10PM
      • by Savannah Logan* Richard Pearson, Wendy Adams

      • Type: Contributed
      • Following the development of the Perceptions of Teaching as a Profession (PTAP) survey, which measures students’ interest in and view of teaching as a career, we are developing a new instrument to measure college faculty’s perceptions of teaching as a profession. We have conducted faculty interviews and collected survey responses from a range of institutions and STEM disciplines. Results of the faculty interviews will be shared. This project is supported by NSF DUE-1821710.
      • Electrified-Efficiency Analysis of Wimshurst Machine

      • HG11
      • Tue 01/15, 2:10PM - 2:20PM
      • by Xiaoyu Niu
      • Type: Contributed
      • Generally, Wimshurst Machines are used to display static electricity phenomenon. Most learners are willing to attribute efficient electrification to friction. In fact, it is induction that enables Wimshurst Machine to produce an astonishing number of charges in an instant. In this paper, we present the process and theory of the electrification by induction and verify it both theoretically and experimentally. In addition, in order to explain the authentic mechanism of Wimshurst Machine, we design three funny experiments: 1) Opposite-Directed Rotating Experiment; 2) Same-Foils Experiment; 3) Angle of Brushes Experiment. Based on above experiments, the mechanism of efficient electrification could be explained into “Model of Exponential Explosion”. Finally, we contribute creatively the process of electrification to Circle System of Positive Feedback or Circle System of Negative Feedback, which could fairly interpret the phenomenon of efficient electrification.

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