AAPT.org - American Association of Physics Teachers
 

Workshops

Below is a current list of workshops planned for the 2015 AAPT Winter Meeting. Most of the workshop will be held on the campus of the University of San Diego. Transportation between the Sheraton and the university will be provided. Sunday morning tutorials (T02, T03, T04, T05) and workshop 35 will be held at the Sheraton Hotel and Marina. 

All workshop registrants are encouraged to bring their own laptops or tablets.

 

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  • T01: (Canceled) Safe Science Practice for in- and Pre-service Teachers

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 01:00 p.m. - 03:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Cathy Ezrailson

    Co-Organizer(s)

    None

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Safety is a concern at all levels of teaching science: classroom or lab. Science teachers must know and apply necessary safety precautions, following regulations in the storage, use, and care of the materials handled and used by students. Teachers who teach science are legally responsible for "standards of care" for their students and should be trained in and adhere to established safety rules and guidelines. Schools and districts must also support teachers and ensure implementation and use of safety guidelines for which they are responsible by organizing safety training, purchasing safety equipment, and maintaining an appropriate class size (24 students is recommended for a science lab). Teachers should also teach their students safe practice and how to engage safely in investigations inside and outside the classroom. to this end this tutorial offers an overview of basic safe science practice using EZ Safe Science iGuide, prepared for public school teachers.

  • T02: Building and Funding Outreach Programs

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

    Organizer

    David Sturm

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Rebecca Thompson

    Cost

    • Members: $50
    • Non-members: $75

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 18

    This tutorial session discusses the how-to of building and funding Outreach Programming to engage the public, with presentations from the APS Head of Public Outreach Rebecca Thompson; from established University Outreach programs run by PIRA physics resource specialists (led by David Sturm of UMaine and Mainely Physics); and from other members of the Outreach community.

  • T03: Electrostatics from Gilbert to Volta

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

    Organizer

    Bob Morse

    Cost

    • Members: $50
    • Non-members: $75

    Seats

    • Max: 16
    • Available: 4

    With inexpensive equipment, students can carry out activities to build a conceptual understanding of electrostatic phenomena. In this short tutorial we will build the equipment and learn to carry out experiments patterned after those from William Gilbert to Alessandro Volta, including charge detection, electric field patterns and electrostatic induction.

  • T04: (Canceled) Transforming lessons to NGSS: Astronomy & Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

    Organizer

    Matthew Perkins

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Brian Kruse

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 25

    The Galileo Educator Network (GEN) is a group of educators and scientists working together to emphasize the integration of science content, science practices, and the nature of science as outlined in the national Framework for K–12 Science Education and Next Generation Science Standards. In this workshop you will participate in several classroom-tested and standards-based astronomy and physics lessons. Each is carefully selected to show how existing astronomy and physics resources and activities can be adapted to emphasize science practices and include reflection on the nature of science. Learn about further opportunities for GEN professional development and connect to a wealth of resources from various professional organizations.

  • T05: Using Elements of History and Philosophy of Physics in Teaching

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Genrikh Golin

    Cost

    • Members: $115
    • Non-members: $140

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 15

    This workshop is designed for those who teach introductory physics at universities, colleges and high schools. Introducing the students to the elements of history and philosophy of science stimulates interest in students, it can be effective means of humanizing education. Studying the process in development of the fundamental physical ideas, the students comprehend more abstract and complicated physical concepts. This hand-on workshop includes the following aspects: Pivotal Ideas in Physics; The Regularities of Physics Development; Classification of Physical Experiments; Methods of Research in Physics (analogy, hypothesis, modeling, thought and real experiments, etc.); The History and Philosophy of Physics as a Component of Teacher Preparation; Biographical Materials in Teaching; Physicists about Physics Education.

  • W01: Workshop on Digital Spectroscopy

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Trina Cannon

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 15

    New Demonstration Experiments In Spectrum Analysis In this workshop, master demonstrator James Lincoln instructs on new techniques in performing spectrum analysis experiments with your students that are sure to improve their learning experience. Also, involved are some old classic trusted demos. Learn also how to use the RSPEC Explorer, a new and inexpensive apparatus that makes teaching spectrum clear to all. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop computer.

  • W02: Creating Interactive Web Simulations Using HTML5 and Javascript

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Andrew Duffy

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Dan Schroeder

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 16
    • Available: 0

    HTML5 and JavaScript have replaced Java and Flash as the leading technology for in-browser software, with the ability to deliver high-performance, graphics-intensive simulations over the web to both personal computers and mobile devices. Participants in this workshop will learn to use this technology to create educational physics simulations that students can run on almost any computer, tablet, or smartphone that can browse the web. The workshop will cover HTML basics, the JavaScript programming language, graphics using the HTML5 canvas element, and essential user-interface controls. Participants should have some prior programming experience (in any language) and must bring their own laptop computers with up-do-date versions of Firefox, Chrome, and a programmer’s text editor such as Notepad++ or TextWrangler. Participants are also encouraged to bring ideas for simulations they would like to create.

  • W03: (Canceled) Changing Inquiry to Engineering in Your Classroom

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Duane Merrill

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 30
    • Available: 30

    A workshop devoted to using engineering activities to teach physics concepts. Examples of using only the materials given to optimize a paper rocket. Controlling variables of mass, length of paper rocket, pressure, angle of launch and aerodynamic design to maximize the horizontal distance a paper rocket can travel. Pull out of activity, Newtons laws of motion, projectile motion, impulse and momentum and other physics principals being investigated. Other activities will also be shared.

  • W04: Beginning Arduino

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Greg Mulder

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Pat Keefe

    Cost

    • Members: $145
    • Non-members: $170

    Seats

    • Max: 18
    • Available: 0

    Microcontrollers are relatively inexpensive devices which you can program to collect data from a variety of sensors types and control external devices such as motors and actuators. Microcontrollers can be used in a variety of classroom activities and student projects. We will focus our workshop on using an Arduino Microcontroller to construct a mini-underwater vehicle that will seek out to hover at a desired programmed depth. We will also discuss how our students use Arduinos for fun, research, underwater ROVs and general exploration. An optional pool-test of your mini-underwater vehicle will occur after the workshop at a nearby hotel pool. Note: you get to keep your mini ROV. No previous microcontroller, programming or electronics experience is required. You need to bring your own Windows, Mac, or Linux computer.

  • W05: Phenomenon-Based Learning: Fun, Hands-on, Cooperative Learning

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Matt Bobrowsky

    Cost

    • Members: $99
    • Non-members: $124

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 7

    "Phenomenon-Based Learning" (PBL) builds knowledge of and interest in physics as a result of observations of real-world phenomena, in this case, some fun gizmos and gadgets. Why PBL? PISA assessments showed that Finnish students were among the top in science proficiency levels. The PBL teaching philosophy combines elements of what's done in Finland with what's known about effective science teaching based on science education research to present science in ways that are both fun and educational. The approach includes elements of progressive inquiry, problem-based learning, collaborative learning, responsive teaching, and hands-on experiments. The idea is to teach broader concepts and useful thinking and performance skills (as with NGSS) rather than asking students to simply memorize facts and formulae. Participants will leave with a copy of the new NSTA book, "Phenomenon-Based Learning: Using Physics Gadgets & Gizmos," and with one of the physics gizmos that goes with the book.

  • W06: (Canceled) Ring Flinger

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Samuel Sampere

    Co-Organizer(s)

    David Sturm

    Cost

    • Members: $260
    • Non-members: $285

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    During this session, you will build (PIRA 5K20.30) a Thompson-Elihu coil, commonly known as the Ring Flinger demonstration. Your completed device will toss 2" OD aluminum rings six meters into the air, and higher when you cool them! Rings fashioned from other materials will jump to different heights. Learn why this is so, and build your own coil to take home by attending this workshop. The completed project weighs about 15 lbs. You should plan to ship your new favorite demo home via UPS or USPS.

  • W07: Teaching Physics for the First Time

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jan Mader

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Karen Jo Matsler

    Cost

    • Members: $67
    • Non-members: $92

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 12

    Teaching Physics for the First Time provides the participants with learning cycles and PER pedagogy that follows the typical first year physics curriculum. Resolve to make teaching and learning of the physics concepts a "phun" adventure.

  • W08: Writing in the Sciences

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Leslie Atkins

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Kim Jaxon, Irene Y. Salter

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 14

    Faculty who teach Physics, Biology and English at California State University, Chico, have collaborated to develop a suite of materials to aid science faculty in improving writing in their science courses. In this workshop, we will familiarize participants with research from the field of composition, and share how findings from composition studies can be used to improve writing instruction in science courses. We will then walk participants through a range of ways in which we embed writing instruction in our courses - from the informal (whiteboards and lab notebooks) to the formal (term papers and exams) - with examples from our own courses. Participants will receive a set of lesson plans and activities they can use in science courses. Appropriate for high school and college/university instructors, suitable for non-science majors. Funding by NSF # 1140860.

  • W09: (Canceled) Reinvigorating Introductory Astronomy with Lecture-Tutorials

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Tim Slater

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 24

    In this half-day, participatory workshop specially designed for introductory college faculty and high school teachers, participants will learn how to use a lecture-tutorial approach to actively engaging astronomy students. Created by faculty affiliated with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research Team, lecture-tutorials are purposefully designed to support students' intellectual engagement with challenging astronomy concepts by augmenting lectures for 10 minute intervals where students collaboratively wrestle with how to apply ideas in novel settings. Astronomy education research consistently demonstrates that students significantly increase their understanding of astronomy through the use of lecture-tutorials and that teachers find them easy to implement. Classroom-ready materials will be provided to all participants. This teaching excellence workshop is funded in part by the Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowment and the NSF TUES & GeoEd OEDG Programs.

  • W10: An Introduction to Scientific Computing with Python and iPython Notebooks

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Larry Engelhardt

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 5

    We will show you how to quickly and easily get started using Python to integrate computation into your physics classes. Python is a simple programming language, appropriate for students of any age. (See "Python for Kids" by J. R. Briggs.) It is simple, but also very powerful (like MATLAB), and it is 100% free (unlike MATLAB). We will introduce the Canopy platform, which includes thousands of Python libraries, a built-in debugger, and the "IPython" notebook interface (similar to Mathematica or Maple...but free). Topics covered will span from making nice-looking plots, to solving differential equations (e.g., Newton's laws), to compiling Python codes to make them as fast as C or Fortran. PLEASE BRING A LAPTOP COMPUTER (Windows, Mac, or Linux).

  • W11: (Canceled) Meeting and Exceeding NGSS

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kenneth Cecire

    Cost

    • Members: $85
    • Non-members: $110

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    The purpose of this workshop is to provide support for high school physics teachers in not only meeting but going beyond the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards. Special attention will be given to classroom activities and investigations that model engineering and science practices found in NGSS.

  • W12: Inquiry Based Labs for AP Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Martha Lietz

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Connie Wells

    Cost

    • Members: $110
    • Non-members: $135

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 11

    In this workshop, participants will be provided with an introduction the new AP Physics 1 and 2 Curricula. We will discuss methodology for inquiry-based labs for both courses, and discuss strategies for converting "cook-book" style labs to be more inquiry-based.

  • W13: Research-Based Alternatives to Traditional Physics Problems

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Kathy Harper

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Thomas M. Foster, David P. Maloney

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 17

    Accumulating research on problem solving in physics clearly indicates that traditional, end-of-chapter exercises in physics texts are not useful and may actually hinder students' learning of important physics concepts. The research also raises questions about the efficacy of such tasks for helping students develop "problem solving skills." In light of these results the question is: What alternative tasks can we use to help students develop problem solving skills and a conceptual understanding? This workshop will review the research and then provide examples of several alternative tasks and their use. Participants will also get practice writing alternative problems in a variety of formats for use in their own classrooms.

  • W14: Modeling in College Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dwain Desbien

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 24
    • Available: 12

    This workshop will introduce participants to tools used in college level modeling classes. Participants will also experience Discourse Management a classroom management strategy developed in conjunction with college modeling but is transferrable to reformed classrooms.

  • W15: Implementing Engineering Design in YOUR Classroom

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    KarenJo Matsler

    Co-Organizer(s)

    TBD

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 10

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have a strong focus on engineering and expect students to understand that engineering is more than tweaking a project or building bridges. It is no longer sufficient for students to demonstrate that they understand core ideas in science, they are also expected to apply the ideas as they engage in science and engineering practices. Come experience a STEM learning cycle that can be used for middle school students or adapted for other grade levels. We will help you untangle science and engineering practices and show how you can break down a complex real-world problem into smaller problems that can be solved through engineering design. You will have a clearer understanding of what engineering design should look like and you will walk away with great ideas of how to help students learn about STEM.

  • W16: (Canceled) Alternative Ways to Teach Electricity using LittleBits and Snap Circuits

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Pati Sievert

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Do you need to integrate critical thinking or engineering design into your physics classroom? Check out our favorite kits for taking electricity and electronics education to the next level. LittleBits take circuits off the board and into students’ creations, allowing them to create an amazing array of creatures or interactive objects. We use Snap Circuits to teach circuits and the basics of electricity to children as young as 7 years old. Snap Circuits make things easy for high school students as well, with components sophisticated enough to tackle introducing electronics. In this workshop you will have an opportunity to “play” with LittleBits and Snap Circuits before tackling some of the challenges we set for middle and high school students. Haven’t seen LittleBits? See what we are talking about at Littlebits.cc.

  • W17: STEM Grant Writing

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jay Bagley

    Cost

    • Members: $135
    • Non-members: $160

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 17

    Workshop Goals: Provide guiding principles for two year colleges and organizations seeking funding. Provide an overview of the grant application and process and share and learn successful grant writing strategies. Know the difference between types of Federal funding grants, cooperative agreements and contracts.

  • W18: (Canceled) Glass Breaker

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Kardelis

    Cost

    • Members: $145
    • Non-members: $170

    Seats

    • Max: 12
    • Available: 12

    Each participant will make and take a device to break a plate glass strip using sound. Traditionally sound is used to break a wine glass to show resonance. While quite spectacular, the wine glass is hard to break. Using plate glass instead of the wine glass offers several advantages. The plate glass breaks at a lower frequency so the high cost driver is not necessary. The necessary volume is reduced. Additionally the glass vibrates in a highly visible and repeatable fashion. The device has become one of my students’ favorite demonstrations. Participants should have access to a precise frequency generator at least 0.1 Hz resolution and a power amplifier. The device is fairly large and heavy, approximately 1ft x 1 ft x 2ft and 35 pounds. Participants should plan on shipping the device.

  • W19: (Canceled) Using the Unity3D Game Engine to Solve Educational Problems

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Andre Bresges

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 18
    • Available: 18

    Unity3D allows to construct appealing Game Worlds that can be navigated on PC, Mac, in Web-browsers or on mobile devices. Educational value is added when the context of a physics phenomenom plays an important role; examples analyzed in the workshop are local climate modeling, simulation of car movement, or the influence of the background while judging the trajectory of a throwball. Attendants learn about the basics of the Unity Design Environment, the use of a terrain engine to construct lush landscapes, the creation of game objects and how to bring them to life using short Javascripts that are attached to the game objects. No prior knowledge or programming skills are assumed. Advanced users are supported while experimenting with character animation, light and camera settings.  Workshop attendees must bring their own Notebook (PC or Mac) with a free version of Unity3D (Source: http://Unity3d.com/download) downloaded, installed and activated.

  • W21: Intersection of Physics and Biology: Activities and Materials

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Nancy Beverly

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Ralf Widenhorn, James Vesenka, Charles DeLeone, Dawn Meredith

    Cost

    • Members: $75
    • Non-members: $100

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 0

    Inspired by last year's Introductory Physics for Life Science Conference or the Gordon Research Conference in Physics Education: The Complex Intersection of Physics and Biology, by having attended or wishing you had. Several groups will share lab activities and curricular materials, to be explored and experienced by workshop participants to enrich their own bio-inspired physics curriculum.

  • W22: (Canceled) Ben Franklin is my Lab Partner

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Robert Morse

    Cost

    • Members: $72
    • Non-members: $97

    Seats

    • Max: 18
    • Available: 18

    Benjamin Franklin's experiments and observations on electricity established not only his reputation as a scientist, but also our electrical conventions and vocabulary, and the principle of charge conservation. In his letters, Franklin builds, tests, and defends his model with skill and eloquence, arguing from experiment and sharing both his wisdom and doubts, while clearly conveying his fascination with electricity. As Franklin was not formally schooled in mathematics, his theory was qualitative, and is an approachable example of hands-on and minds-on construction of a conceptual model with explanatory power. In this workshop, developed by the author at the Wright Center for Science Teaching at Tufts University, we will work with Franklin's descriptions to recreate several of his experiments using modern, inexpensive materials. Participants will receive equipment and a CD-ROM containing the workshop manual, a collection of Franklin's letters relating to electricity, and movie clips illustrating the experiments.

  • W23: Fun & Engaging Physics Labs

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Wendy Adams

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Duane Merrell

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 25
    • Available: 0

    In this workshop we will share many labs that are suitable for both high school and introductory college physics. The labs are challenging but not too difficult and, leave plenty of room for creativity! We have found success by limiting the goals for the labs to: 1. Fun and engaging, 2. Built in student choice, 3. Related to this week's material. The labs are effective at engaging the students in problem solving and conceptual understanding. Merrell used this type of lab as a high school teacher and physics quickly became one of the most popular classes in the school. Adams, inspired by Merrell, has found that her college students no longer rush to leave, and in some cases stay to see how other groups do even after they’ve turned in their lab write up for the day! This workshop will allow you to try out these labs for yourself.

  • W24: Engaging TYC students in Astronomical Inquiry

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Tim Slater

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Tim Slater

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 40
    • Available: 28

    How can we help our introductory astronomy students with little to no science experience begin to have success at doing science themselves? In order for novice students to effectively design, conduct, report, and defend science observations and experiments, they must be purposefully supported in each step of the scientific process before they are able to successfully pursue scientific questions of their own design. This workshop provides strategies for bringing these two ideas together: an introduction to scaffolding strategies that teach students to fruitfully engage in scientific thinking and designing astronomy investigations by mining online astronomy databases. Participants in this workshop will structure effective student learning experiences using NASA databases. All participants receive copies of classroom-ready teaching materials for guiding students’ inquiry in astronomy based on the principles of a backwards faded scaffolding approach, developed by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research. Bring your laptop.

  • W25: Creating Affectively-Positive Online Learning Environments

    Date/Time

    • Sat, Jan 3
    • 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Dedra Demaree

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Kyle Kuhn

    Cost

    • Members: $65
    • Non-members: $90

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 13

    At Georgetown University, we have been assisting faculty with creating online learning modules using Adobe Captivate 7. These modules are being used to supplement learning, to flip classrooms, and to provide real-time feedback to both students and the instructor. We have found that faculty are excellent at explaining the content in their modules but often do not have a clear template for how to address the holistic student experience in the eLearning environment. In this workshop, we will present (and distribute) a Captivate template that users can have as a base for building online learning modules. The workshop will illustrate key design principles for creating self-directed learning modules that are easy for students to navigate. We will walk participants through the different ways that we have included attention to the affective nature of the student experience within the module template, and the theoretical and practical reasons for each module detail.

  • W26: Distance Labs (Cancelled)

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Jacob Millspaw

    Cost

    • Members: $120
    • Non-members: $145

    Seats

    • Max: 18
    • Available: 18

    Distance education is on the rise. This includes courses delivered through live video feed to remote locations or through online learning. The need for hands on exploration in distance classes and developing labs for online courses poses new challenges! We have developed a full curriculum of labs for use with two of our physics courses. One is a general education light and color course and the other is an algebra based mechanics course. Topics include motion, forces, harmonic motion, work, color mixing, geometric optics and various other introductory physics concepts.

  • W27: Metacognition and Reasoning in Physics

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    MacKenzie Stetzer

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Andrew Boudreaux, Sara Julin, Mila Kryjevskaia

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 0

    It is well known that experts consciously monitor their own reasoning and engage in other metacognitive practices when they are confronted with a new challenge, while novices often persist in unproductive approaches. We have been investigating the relationships among student metacognition, conceptual understanding, and qualitative reasoning in introductory and upper-division physics courses. This represents the first phase of a larger effort to develop a flexible suite of metacognitive activities that are tightly linked to specific physics content and that may be incorporated into common learning environments, including lecture, laboratory, and recitation. This workshop will focus on how students' metacognitive practices impact their reasoning in physics, and will also highlight practical and intellectual challenges associated with assessing student metacognition. We will describe some of our emerging methodologies, give participants firsthand experience examining written student work and video data, share some of our preliminary findings, and discuss implications for instruction.

  • W28: Astronomy and Physics Simulations for Computers and Tablets

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Mario Belloni

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Todd Timberlake, Michael Gallis

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 14

    The Easy Java/JavaScript Simulation (EjsS) Tool enables students and teachers to create Java simulations by providing simplified tools that lower the barriers involved in Java programming. Over 600 EjsS astronomy and physics simulations are freely available on the Open Source Physics (OSP) site (http://www.compadre.org/OSP/). Recently, the EjsS desktop tool has expanded to include the creation of JavaScript simulations that run on both computers and tablets. This workshop begins with exploring the OSP ComPADRE site to find and run JavaScript simulations. Participants will then receive a free EjsS Reader for tablets that automatically connects to ComPADRE and downloads these JavaScript simulations. We will also introduce the EjsS tool (freely available on ComPADRE) and lead participants through creating JavaScript simulations. Participants are encouraged to bring laptops to install and run the EJS desktop tool and tablets to install the Reader.

  • W29: (Canceled) Sketch and Etch

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Eric Ayars

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Steve Lindaas

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 20

    Make your own circuit boards! This workshop will offer hands-on experience in the physical process of creating your own circuit board from scratch. Participants will design, print, etch, and solder a really cool electronic gizmo they can wear on their badge for the rest of the meeting, making them the envy of all the other nerds. (Additionally, the skills gained may be useful in building experimental apparatus for physics labs.)

  • W30: Making Good Physics Videos

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    James Lincoln

    Cost

    • Members: $70
    • Non-members: $95

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 3

    Flipping the Classroom and the emergence of free online video hosting has led many of us to be asked to make videos of our lessons and demos. In this workshop, you will learn the five methods of video engagement, fast and effective video writing techniques, and beginner/intermediate editing skill competency that will improve your video quality and help get your message across more effectively. Your instructor is master physics teacher and filmmaker James Lincoln who has made over 100 science videos. Tips and ideas for effective and engaging physics demos are also included.

  • W31: Low Cost, In Home Labs

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Alex Burr

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 14

    A physics course without experiments is not a physics course. However many general physics instructors in high schools and colleges feel pressured in terms of money and time to neglect this aspect of physics instruction. This workshop will address these problems. The participants will actually do real experiments which do not have to use expensive, sophisticated equipment, and take up valuable class time. These experiments can illustrate advanced experimental concepts and show that if you ask questions of nature, she will answer. Topics mentioned include mechanics, electricity, and optics. They will be done individually and in groups. Participants should bring Apple or Android smart phones or tablets if they have them. Participants will leave with inexpensive apparatus, detailed notes, and a renewed commitment to physics as an experimental science.

  • W32: Writing Learning Objectives

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Juan Burciaga

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 16

    Writing effective learning objectives is a critical first step in designing and preparing a course or a curriculum but most faculty have no formal training in this process. Yet learning objectives describe the goals of the course, outline the limits of the instruction, and define the assessment strategies that will be used. Writing effective learning goals is in essence not simply the first step but represent most of the work in designing a course. The workshop will focus on the basics of writing effective learning objectives and allow participants an opportunity of practicing on developing their own sets of objectives.

  • W33: Simple DC Labs

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Ann Brandon

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Deborah Lojkutz

    Cost

    • Members: $80
    • Non-members: $105

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 17

    Most students come to physics class with no experience in D-C Circuits. This workshop provides an integrated series of activities and labs powered by 9 volt batteries to introduce D-C Circuits. It builds from 'What is a circuit' (Sparky) thru Resistors in a Circuit, Voltages in a Circuit, and Currents in a Circuit to Ohm's Law. It includes problem sheets for in class and homework. Participants will receive an inexpensive digital meter, a breadboard and assorted parts.

  • W34: New RTP and ILD Tools and Curricula: Video Analysis, Clickers and E&M Labs

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    David Sokoloff

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Ronald K. Thornton, Priscilla W. Laws

    Cost

    • Members: $75
    • Non-members: $100

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 12

    RealTime Physics (RTP) and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) have been available for over 15 years—so what's new? The 3rd Edition of RTP includes five new labs on basic electricity and magnetism in Module 3 as well a new approach to projectile motion in Module 1. Some of these new labs make use of video analysis. Also new are clicker-based ILDs. This hands-on workshop is designed for those who want to make effective use of active learning with computer-based tools in their introductory courses. These active learning approaches for lectures, labs, and recitations (tutorials) are based on physics education research (PER). The following will be distributed: Modules from the Third Edition of RTP, the ILD book, the Physics with Video Analysis book and CD, and Teaching Physics with the Physics Suite by E.F. Redish. Organizer: David Sokoloff and Co-Organizers: Ronald K. Thornton, Tufts University Priscilla W. Laws, Dickinson College.

  • W35: Creating Physics Simulations for Smartphones, Tablet Devices, and Computers in HTML5

    Date/Time

    • Sun, Jan 4
    • 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

    Organizer

    Gerd Kortemeye

    Co-Organizer(s)

    Wolfgang Bauer

    Cost

    • Members: $60
    • Non-members: $85

    Seats

    • Max: 20
    • Available: 9

    HTML5-based simulations have emerged as the new platform-independent leader in interactive web content. This workshop will cover the essential elements of HTML, of JavaScript, and of the HTML5 JavaScript elements. You will learn how to use event-handlers, how to construct a user interface for different devices, and you will learn how to use produce device-independent graphical output via the canvas element in HTML5. You will also learn how to make your HTML5 apps available to your students as well as other teacher. Every workshop attendee will receive a set of working examples of different interactive simulations, which can be used as templates to create other simulations. Basic programming experience is assumed, and workshop attendees are required to bring their own laptop computer with a current version of Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, or Safari.

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