AAPT Summer Meeting 2024

 

 

 

2024 Summer Meeting Workshops

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AAPT is offering many workshops in association with the upcoming 2024 AAPT Summer Meeting. These workshops will take place on July 6 & 7. This is a great opportunity to gather with your colleagues and learn some new teaching techniques while engaging in thoughtful discussion. Be sure and register early, as these workshops can fill up quickly. 

Location:  Westin Boston Waterfront Seaport District unless otherwise noted under the Workshop.

Cost: All half-day workshops (four hours) will cost $75 for members and $100 for non-members. All full-day workshops (eight hours) will cost $125 for members and $150 for non-members. 

There is an $85 fee to register for a workshop if you are not registering for the 2024 AAPT Summer Meeting. 

Laptops: We encourage everyone to bring their own laptops to the workshops. 

Continuing Education Units (CEU): Earn CEU hours for attending one of the AAPT workshops.  Earn 0.40 hours for a 1/2 day workshop. Earn 0.80 hours for a full day workshop. Any workshop under 4 hours does not qualify for CEU hours. 

 

Saturday, July 6

 

AP Physics Course Revisions for Fall 2024

The 2024-25 school year will introduce a new, common, exam format for all AP physics courses, as well as some curricular modifications for each course. This includes a smaller set of science practices, consistent across all four courses. The workshop will familiarize teachers with the new curricula. It will take a deep dive into the key features and major differences between the new curriculum and its predecessor, focusing on science practices. Attendees will develop skills to adapt and implement the new curriculum in their classrooms. The revised exams will be reviewed and participants will work through case studies with sample questions tied to each science practice. Strategies to prepare students will be discussed and modeled.

Date: July 6
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Kathleen Harper, Amy Johnson, John Pinnizotto, Jesse Miner
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Bridging the Gap: Data Science Applications in Modern Physics Education

This workshop will introduce participants to incorporating data science into the undergraduate physics curriculum. The materials were developed by a dedicated team of postdocs and PhD students who were fellows of the Data Science Education Community of Practice (DSECOP). We will do a hands-on walk-through of getting started with Cloud-based tools such as Google Colab before leading an interactive session on two lessons that can be used in different physics courses. One lesson will focus on how Monte Carlo methods in physics naturally extend to machine learning algorithms such as deep neural networks using the Ising model as an example. The other lesson will provide an introduction to histograms as a tool for exploratory and more in-depth data analysis, providing instruction on both constructing and analyzing histograms. We will also have faculty who have taught using these tools provide their insights on what’s required for a successful experience. All of the materials are freely available.  The modules are hosted at:https://github.com/GDS-Education-Community-of-Practice/DSECOP  Please bring a laptop and make sure you have a Google account. This workshop is targeted toward those who have some knowledge of Python. The material was designed with postsecondary education physics faculty in mind. No prior experience in data science is required.

Date: July 6
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
Organizer(s): Alexis Knaub, Casey Berger, Ashley Dale, Radha Mastandrea, Mohammad Soltanieh-ha, William Ratcliff
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Building Thinking Classrooms

Sense making in a science class has the expectation that students think. This workshop will engage participants in a thinking classroom in which thinking to make sense of a phenomena is the norm, and students are discouraged from slacking, stalling, mimicking, and faking their way through the physics content.  The goal of a thinking classroom is to build engaged students that are willing to think about any task.

Date: July 6
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
Organizer(s): Earl Legleiter
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Demos @ MIT

The purpose of this workshop is to provide an example of how a larger demonstration group operates and how we have integrated ourselves into flipped classrooms beyond providing  demonstration services. The workshop will include a tour of all of our classrooms, workshops, storage, and lab spaces necessary for our education mission; a presentation on the structure of PIRL (Physics Instructional Resources Lab), how it fits within the Physics Department; and how we use demonstrations in the flipped classroom model; followed by a physics demonstration show exhibiting many of the historical pieces that currently reside within PIRL's demonstration collection, including Robert J. Van de Graaff's prototype Van de Graaff, and a Marconi coil of the same make as was on the Titanic. There will be a decent amount of travel between rooms so bring comfortable shoes. All spaces will be accessible via elevator for people with mobility disabilities.

Date: July 6
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
  Location: MIT Room 6-120
Organizer(s): Joshua Wolfe, Caleb Bonyun, Christopher Miller, Rosie Anderson
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member  

Exploring Physics through the Lens of Systems

In physics, we often just focus on the forces or motion of one object that we treat as a dot. But we can also make that dot represent what looks like multiple objects at first glance. Learning to think in terms of multiple systems can help students see problems from multiple perspectives or at multiple scales, allowing them to find new insights or simplify their work. In this workshop, we will explore the concept of systems and system models. This NGSS crosscutting concept can be integrated into the four fundamental models of introductory physics (kinematics, forces, energy, and momentum) with small changes or additions that help students think in terms of systems. We will explore using systems thinking in the four models through labs, problems, and discussions. Thinking in terms of systems will even allow us to naturally develop the idea of center of mass and explore interdisciplinary concepts like the sociopolitical context of a nuclear power plant. Although we hope that this workshop will be interesting to a wide audience, our target audience is high school teachers.

Date: July 6
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
Organizer(s): Michael Lerner, Kelly O'Shea
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Intermediate and Advanced Labs workshop
 
This workshop is appropriate for college and university instructional laboratory developers. At each of five stations, presenters will demonstrate an approach to an intermediate or advanced laboratory exercise. Each presenter will show and discuss the apparatus and techniques used. Attendees will cycle through the stations and have an opportunity to use each apparatus. Documentation will be provided for each experiment, with sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase information.
Date: 
July 6  
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon  
Organizer(s): L Dana, Nathan Tompkins, Nathan Powers
Cost: $100 member/$125 non-member  
 

Writing and Evaluating Curricular Materials for the IPLS Portal

The Living Physics Portal (LPP) is an effort by the physics and biology faculty and PER/BER researchers to design, develop, and disseminate new curricular materials for the courses in introductory physics for the life sciences. The first part of the workshop will focus on finding, adapting, and using curricular resources on the LPP. Several sample key resources will be identified and studied. The last part of the workshop is designed to introduce the concepts, practices, and standards of educational scholarship. Faculty who adopt curricular resources from the LPP or other sources will therefore be better able to offer insightful critiques to the developers of the curricular resources. Interested faculty may also learn how to develop curricular materials for their own classrooms for use by the LPP community. Attendees will find having a laptop useful but not required.
Date: July 6
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
Organizer(s): Juan Burciaga
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Authentic Data-based Astronomy Research with JS9

Cost of workshop will be refunded for attendees. Js9 web-based software allows you to retrieve, display, and analyze data from astronomical archives. This access to real data from observatories in all bands of the electromagnetic spectrum together with js9 analysis tools such as light curves, energy spectra, and more allow one to pursue their own research projects.  In this workshop, you will be introduced to the js9 interface and toolbox, how to find FITS files and upload them, and ideas for various research projects such as on colliding galaxies, type 1a vs type 2 supernovae, expansion rates of supernova remnants, and possible evidence for dark matter. We will also discuss how existing scientific papers can be “backwards engineered” to construct introductory activities to familiarize users with js9 before a research project. The material in this workshop is suitable for use in amateur astronomy clubs, Science Olympiad groups, classrooms, and labs. Please bring a laptop.

Date: July 6
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Pamela Perry
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Integration of Computation into Lab Courses

Participants will learn a number of ways to incorporate computation in laboratory activities and experiments. Python will be used, along with Jupyter notebooks, and a number of python extensions often used in data science applications. Activities will also involve interfacing with experiments and collecting data directly. Please bring a laptop computer.

Date: July 6
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Steve Spicklemire
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Quantum Computing: What's the Buzz?

Are you interesting in learning more about Quantum Computing? Have you been asked to teach it or introduce some of the concepts into courses you are already teaching? What’s the state of the field anyway? Do you just want to be more informed about this fascinating, relatively new field? Should it be taught in Physics or Computer Science or Chemistry or Math or all of them!?  If you find yourself interested in these questions, this workshop is for you. We will give an overview of the present state of the field, present an introduction to Quantum Computing, including discussion of our experiences learning the topics and teaching them, course coverage, format and learning materials, research we have done on student strengths and difficulties in learning quantum computing topics, and the development of evidence-based materials to teach the course. We will share information on freely available online resources, our own evidence-based materials, and possible texts. We will focus on an undergraduate course, but it will be relevant for classes above and below that level, too. Bring a wi-fi enabled laptop.

Date: July 6
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Beth Thacker, Tunde Kushimo
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Sunday, July 7

 

Developing strategies for accessible and inclusive group work

 

The purpose of this workshop is to collectively develop strategies for accessible and inclusive group work. Through an extensive literature review, we have developed a guide of effective and inclusive group work strategies. Using this guide as a jumping off point, we will discuss and document accessible and inclusive practices to support disabled students in physics courses. This workshop is appropriate for high school teachers, postsecondary instructors, and students with an interest in teaching. Please bring your own computer to use during the workshop.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Daryl McPadden, Erin Scanlon, Matt Guthrie, Xian Wu
Cost: $125 member/$150 non-member 

Learn Physics While Practicing Science: Introduction to ISLE

Participants* will learn how to modify introductory physics courses at any level to help students develop a good conceptual foundation, apply this knowledge in problem solving, and engage them in science practices. The framework for these modifications is the Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) approach. We provide tested curriculum materials including: (a) The second edition of College Physics Textbook by Etkina, Planinsic and Van Heuvelen, the Physics Active Learning Guide and the Instructor Guide; (b) a website with over 200 videotaped experiments and questions for use in the classroom, laboratories, and homework; (c) a set of innovative labs in which students design their own experiments, and (d) newly developed curriculum materials that implement the ISLE approach in both online and in-person settings. During the workshop the participants will learn how to use the materials in college and high school physics courses to help their students learn physics by practicing it. *Please bring your own laptop to the workshop if you own one. If you do not own a computer, you will be paired with somebody who does.

Date: July 7
Time:
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Location: MIT Room 4-349
Organizer(s): David Brookes, Yuhfen Lin, Yuehai Yang, Joshua Rutberg
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Biomedically Relevant Physics with Phones!

How can your smartphone help you investigate blood flow across your heart valves?  The normal forces that act on you during a walking gait?  A running gait?  Participants in this workshop will use their smartphones to experience hands-on, inquiry-based biomedical investigations designed to engage physics students interested in health and life sciences.  The workshop curriculum will use the sensors already embedded in every smartphone, thus increasing usability and making it possible for every student in your classroom (in-person or remote) to conduct the experiments.  Using state-of-the-art medical applications, participants will conduct experiments using the accelerometer, gyroscope and image sensors on your phone to characterize the biomechanical motion of your gait, cardiac cycle including aortic and mitral value opening and closing, the periodic blood flow in your finger during systole and diastole, and the physiological tremors of your hand.  Editable, active-learning biomedical physics curriculum using the smartphone as a sensor will be shared allowing faculty to implement the smartphone as an investigative tool in your “Introductory Physics for the Life Science and Beyond” classrooms.  Participants should bring their own smartphone to this workshop and a computer loaded with their favorite spreadsheet software to process data that will be collected during the workshop.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Scott Franklin, Nancy Donaldson, Mayuri Gilhooly
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Demos @ Harvard

The Harvard Natural Sciences Lecture Demonstrations team welcomes participants to a half-day workshop including a tour of as many of our demonstration spaces (storage, fabrication, and preparation) as the untimely renovation of our Science Center and lecture halls will permit, as well as performing and answering questions on selected demonstrations spanning mechanics and fluids, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, thermal, and modern physics. Each year we support roughly thirty courses reaching approximately two thousand students, who report demonstrations are among the most memorable and enjoyable aspects of their Harvard experience. In this workshop, we aim to provide the same to you. (https://sciencedemonstrations.fas.harvard.edu/)

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Daniel Davis, Allen Crockett, Daniel Rosenberg, Susan Schmidt, Wolfgang Rueckner
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Equity in STEM: Exploring the Underrepresentation Curriculum

The Underrepresentation Curriculum is a free, open, modular, teacher-created resource that supports high school and college science instructors in empowering students to examine issues of equity, identity, and justice in society and in STEM. This workshop will introduce the curriculum by engaging participants themselves in the learning activities (e.g., discussing the role of objectivity and subjectivity in science and analyzing data about disparities in representations of certain groups of people). The workshop will familiarize participants with the support materials available and make space for exploration. Finally, participants will have the opportunity to discuss how the curriculum can be implemented in their classrooms, and collaborate with other instructors to create viable actions beyond the workshop. 

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
Organizer(s): Clausell Mathis, Abigail Daane, and Chris Gosling
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Incorporating computational physics in the undergraduate curriculum

 

This interactive workshop welcomes all physics instructors from high schools (AP), two-year colleges, 4-year colleges, and universities who are interested in including a computational component in their courses. The workshop will offer multiple resources attendees can use in the classroom including instructional materials and assignments. We will also include an introduction to the resources on the PICUP web site (Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics) https://www.compadre.org/PICUP/, and assessment tools. Attendees will also benefit from getting to know others who are interested in computing in the physics curriculum, and network with others with similar interests. The workshop will include hands-on time, so please bring a laptop. No prior programming experience is needed. We will present materials and provide resources in multiple formats including excel spreadsheets. This workshop is supported by the NSF, grant DUE-2021209.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Andy Garvin, Gautam Vemuri,
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Learning From Drawings: Using TYLeS to Survey Educational STEM Programs

I led a group of students at a hands-on event for a Girl Scout STEM Expo in October of 2023, at which we had 3rd-6th grade school children rotate between three stations. The stations were each themed (Optics, Waves, Electrostatics) and at each station students would learn about the topic for 4-5 minutes, get to play with the science toys for 5-7 minutes, and then draw what they learned for 2-3 minutes. Students were asked to take their drawings home with them, but some drawings were left behind. This incidental data set I conducted a qualitative review of using the Thank You Letter Surveys (TYLeS) methodology in order to discern what students were drawing, and to learn what they were learning.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM to Noon
Organizer(s): Patrick Morgan
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

LHC Physics in the Classroom

Students who complete an introductory physics course may be under the impression that physics somehow “stopped” in the late 19th or early 20th century. Of course this idea could not be further from the truth, as physicists today continue to work on addressing an ever-growing list of unsolved questions: Where has all the antimatter gone? What is dark matter? What is dark energy? (What questions have we not thought of yet?) Physicists from all over the world work to address these and many other questions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, on the border of Switzerland and France. This workshop will focus on how teachers can tap into the excitement of LHC physics to both motivate students and provide a contemporary context for them to engage with topics and practices covered in introductory physics courses, including (but not limited to) conservation laws, data collection, organization, and analysis, and making claims based on evidence. Participants in this workshop will alternate between “student mode” and “teacher mode”, will analyze authentic LHC data, and will get a chance to work through some activities from QuarkNet’s Data Activities Portfolio. The workshop will conclude with a discussion on classroom implementation. Some of the activities will be computer-based, so please bring along a laptop! This workshop is supported by the NSF-funded QuarkNet program, https://quarknet.org, and OPTYCs, https://optycs.aapt.org.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Shane Wood

Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Professional Development for Emerging Education Researchers (PEER)

 

PEER is designed for emerging education researchers interested in expanding theoretical or methodological expertise. Through peer and near-peer exchange, this PEER workshop involves hands-on activities to increase participants' capacity for Discipline-based Education Research. Topics include research design, choosing appropriate theoretical frameworks, and matching one's research questions to accessible data. A hallmark of PEER workshops is their responsiveness to participant interests, and activities center around advancing each individual's specific research project.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Scott Franklin, Mary Bridget Kustusch,
Eleanor Sayre
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Quantum Journey in a Box

In this workshop we will introduce and play games that we have developed to motivate K12 students to learn concepts from quantum information science:  quantum key distribution, quantum cloning, and quantum teleportation. No prior quantum knowledge needed.

Date: July 7
Time: 8:00 AM  to Noon
Organizer(s): Jean-Francois Van Huele, Charlotte Whiteside

Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Reasoning with Multiple Representations in AP Physics (and Beyond)

 

The 2024-25 school year will introduce revamped AP physics exams in all courses.  This workshop will briefly share highlights of the exam redesign, one of which is reasoning with multiple representations (words, diagrams, equations, graphs, etc.).  The bulk of the workshop will be participants working through and discussing a variety of problem solving activities that incorporate multiple representations. While these curricular tools will be presented in the context of AP courses, they are impactful in any physics course.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Kathleen Harper, Jeff Funkhouser, Rebecca Howell, Amy Johnson, John Pinnizotto, Jesse Miner
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

200+ Physics Simulations to Inspire Classroom Engagement

In this workshop, participants will explore more than 200 physics simulations, learn about research-based best practices for their use, and create activities for their own classrooms. The VIPER physics simulations (http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/VIPER/) and best practices shared in this workshop are for introductory physics and astronomy at both the college and high school levels. The majority of the time spent in this workshop will be in creating new activities, providing opportunities for participants to share in small groups, elicit feedback from each other, and work through a multi-step design process. Existing activities created by our Boston University PER group and others will be shared as examples and models for the developed work. As the goal of this workshop is for participants to walk away with completed activities for their own classroom, we ask that everyone please bring a laptop to the workshop. The Visualizations in Physics Education Research (VIPER) project is supported by NSF DUE-2120980 and DUE-1712159.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Andrew Duffy, Emily Allen, Manher Jariwala
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Computer Science Integration in HS Physics and Physical Science

 

Ever wondered how to integrate a little bit of coding or data science into a high school physics or physical science class without overwhelming your students or taking up lots of class time? This hands-on workshop will provide an overview of simple, conceptually-motivated “STEMcoding” exercises where students construct PhET-like games like asteroids and angry birds using an in-browser editor that works great on chromebooks or whatever devices you have. We will also provide a tutorial of the STEMcoding Object Tracker which is a browser-based program that can track the motion of brightly colored objects moving against a solid colored background. These activities are part of a much wider curriculum that is highlighted on the STEMcoding YouTube channel (http://YouTube.com/c/STEMcoding). The STEMcoding project is led by Prof. Chris Orban from Ohio State Physics. PLEASE BRING A LAPTOP, chromebook or a tablet with a physical keyboard.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Chris Orban
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Dreaming of Liberatory Futures in Physics Education

 

Physics has been and continues to be a site of racial oppression, as evidenced by both the stories of harm voiced by People of Color in the discipline and by the large-scale patterns in outcomes for People of Color in the field. A critical lens calls us to both acknowledge and seek to dismantle the impacts of white supremacy in physics and to lean into a liberatory imagination, envisioning and then working to co-create a future that centers collective thriving. As a conceptual framework and methodological approach, critical race spatial analysis (CRSA) provides such a lens to help identify spatial dimensions of injustice in physics teaching and learning, while simultaneously curating “counter-spaces” that dream imagined futures to design racially just classrooms.  As part of a NSF-funded project, an interdisciplinary team that includes physics undergraduate students are collaborating to articulate the possibility of a new spatial imaginary in physics, guided by the tenets of CRSA. For this workshop, we will share both the process and products of this dreaming process, including visualizations of liberatory physics classrooms. We will invite participants to co-dream with us about liberatory physics education through a series of discussions, art-making, and curricular planning centered around three questions: 1) How can art be employed to examine oppression in classrooms and other learning spaces and used to design a physics community in which everyone gets what they need and deserve? 2) What kinds of collectives and strategies could we curate or join to make a vision of a liberatory physics education “real”? and 3) How might we build from this workshop, as physics instructors, to transform physics classrooms going forward?

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Amy Robertson, Lauren Bauman,
Trà Huỳnh, W. Tali Harrison,  Vero Vélez
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

Dual Process Theories to Interpret Students' Physics Reasoning

We have been investigating the relationships among students’ intuition, reasoning, and conceptual understanding in physics. A major part of this project has been the development of assessment tasks and methods for disentangling conceptual understanding and reasoning. We have drawn on dual-process theories of reasoning from cognitive science in the interpretation of student learning data and the development of instructional interventions to improve student reasoning. In this workshop, participants will engage with these issues by examining written student responses and viewing and discussing video. We will present curricular interventions developed in alignment with dual-process theories and will describe a framework that can be used for the development of additional interventions.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Andrew Boudreaux, Beth Lindsey, MacKenzie Stetzer, Mila Kryjevskaia, Paula Heron 
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

Fun, Engaging, Effective, Intro Labs and Demos (plus Virtual Options) 

Participants in this workshop will have hands-on experience with research-validated active learning activities for the introductory laboratory—including RealTime Physics (RTP) labs using computer-based tools and video analysis—that have been used effectively in university, college and high school physics courses. They will also experience Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs)—a strategy for making lectures more active learning environments. These active learning approaches are fun, engaging and validated by physics education research (PER). Research results demonstrating the effectiveness of RTP and ILDs will be presented. Emphasis will be on activities in mechanics, electricity and magnetism and optics. Distance learning options for lab and lecture will also be included. The following will be distributed: Modules from the Third Edition of RTP, the ILD book and free access to virtual materials for lab and lecture. Participants should bring their laptop (with USB-A or USB-C connection). They will be given a link to download Vernier Graphical Analysis and Video Analysis to use in the workshop along with a free trial period.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): David Sokoloff, Ronald K. Thornton
Cost: $95 member/$120 non-member 

Introductory Labs to Promote Scientific Reasoning

Scientific reasoning and decision-making abilities are highly sought outcomes of modern education. We have developed and evaluated a complete inquiry-based lab curriculum that explicitly promotes these abilities by engaging students in activities that include designing and conducting controlled experiments, making appropriate decisions, conducting data analysis, and interpreting and synthesizing results to construct meaningful evidence-based claims. The curriculum aligns with the AAPT Lab Guidelines and cultivates an inclusive culture to support a diverse population. During the workshop, participants will work through several lab activities to learn about the underlying curricular framework, which involves operationally defined sub-skills:  including abilities for controlling variables in multi-variable contexts, data analytics, and causal reasoning.  Participants will learn how assessments can be used to measure important skills-based outcomes, and our own results will be shared. Participants will be provided access to all lab materials (both in-person and online versions) and assessments, as well as learn how to modify their existing in-person or online labs, if preferred.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Krista Wood, Kathleen Koenig, Lei Bao
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member 

 

TEAM UP Together & Transfer Students: Supporting student transfer between two- and four-year institutions

 

For students transferring from two-year to four-year institutions, the transition itself is known to have multiple challenges. Given that a larger proportion of minoritized students, especially Black and African American, begin their physics degrees at two-year colleges, building better bridges across these institutions can provide necessary support for student success. In this workshop, we explore the findings from the TEAM-UP report, and work collaboratively to strategize ways to make the transfer process seamless. These plans will help all transfer students succeed, and have the potential to help all students by reducing barriers to success. This workshop is sponsored by the TEAM-UP Together Program and The Organization for Physics at Two-Year Colleges (NSF grant #2212807).

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM  to 5:00 PM
Organizer(s): Arlene Modeste Knowles, Joe Heafner, Mel Sabella, Anthony Escuardo
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member  

TEAL Blended Learning Workshop

Technology Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) is a twenty-three year ongoing educational experiment at MIT in developing a flipped active learning model for two introductory physics courses, Physics I Newtonian Mechanics (8.01) and Physics II Electricity and Magnetism (8.02). The workshop will be held in the TEAL classroom at MIT. It will include a description of the pedagogical model and an example lesson illustrating how Faraday’s Law is taught in the TEAL style. Participants should bring their laptops.

Date: July 7
Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Location: MIT Room 32-082
Organizer(s): Sean Robinson, Peter Dourmashkin, Michelle Tomasik, Mohamed Abdelhafez, Shams El-Adawy
Cost: $75 member/$100 non-member

 

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